Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Jochi1543

Members
  • Content Count

    11,596
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Jochi1543

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 12/28/1984

Profile Information

  • Occupation
    50% EMT, 50% Hero

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I'm in Chilliwack, BC where we do a lot of extra emerg on top of the regular ER rotation (1 shift per month minimum, and options to pick up many more). Our program is well-known for its ER training, both in terms of grads going onto PGY-3 and in terms of preparing people to work independently in smaller communities without having to get the extra training. Roughly half my year is planning to do an R3 in emerg, and the program is good at making time for you to get in ER electives before the R3 applications open. E.g. we generally don't have any electives in PGY-1, but for all my colleagues who are interested in doing the 3rd year training, our coordinator has rearranged their rotations so they can do at least 1, if not 2 months of electives in PGY-1.
  2. I've read this one before. One thing that I find interesting is that a lot of it seems to do with the author's personality and approach to things rather than medicine in general. She talks a lot about uncertainty and doubt about her practice, and dwelling on her decisions constantly. That's definitely not something everyone experiences. I've met people like that in medicine, and it seems like it's a terrible mindset to have to deal with. I don't know if that makes you a better or worse doctor, but it sure increases your stress 10000-fold. I consider myself lucky in that I generally can make decisions fairly quickly and I don't second-guess myself too much. On the rare occasions where something happened that made me question what I did, the outcome was either still what I expected (after much more workup) OR someone else more qualified than me made the same mistake. E.g. I missed a non-displaced fracture the other day, but so did the ER physician AND the internist, so I did not beat myself up too much over it. I work with a preceptor who's very OCPD and anxious about things, and I often talk him down into doing less intense workups and just letting things be, and everything always turns out alright. You have to learn to take it easy on yourself and have some confidence in your abilities, and you also need to learn when to step back and involve someone else's expertise, otherwise you will drive yourself insane and burn out. I think the author of the article would've done much better in a very narrow specialty rather than GIM, somewhere where she would only have to worry about 5-10 common conditions.
  3. I stand corrected, things must've changed lately - I haven't looked at this for a few years. Thanks!
  4. You have 2 years after grad to do the +1.
  5. Depends, I like UpToDate because it's succint and there isn't a ton of references in the body of the text. They also have nice patient handouts. Dynamed, however, is good for things such as researching alternative medicine or less commonly used treatments. If a patient brings in a bottle of pills from a health food store and asks, "Is the stuff in here any good," it's Dynamed that I end up using.
  6. It's been a while since I saw anything worthwhile from anyone beyond my closest group of friends. For me, it's mostly a way to share funny things and chat with a select few.
  7. Depends, if you have a job now, getting a mortgage shouldn't be too hard. I applied for it while I was still working full-time and didn't say I was going to start med school. My parents gave me the downpayment and the mortgage was mine. Cons: 1) I moved for residency, so I had to make a decision to sell or rent. The real estate prices on the type of building my condo is in have actually decreased, so I would definitely lose some $ selling it. 2) Also, I invested a fair bit into obligatory repairs throughout the 4 years I lived there - probably close to $15,000 for things like roof replacement, window and sliding door replacement, and smaller things. 3) Also, my condo fees went up almost 60% in 2 years. They have remained the same since and will stay the same next year, but as you can imagine, I was not thrilled. Pros: 1) I was able to rent it no problem since it's in a great location and a decent suite; it also allows pets, which makes it very popular. Even though my condo fees have shot up so much, I am currently making $200 a month off of the condo. Nothing mind-blowing, but that's more than $0, and after a year, I will have made $2400 and in the meantime, my tenants' rent will also have paid off like $6,000 from my mortgage. 2) Mortgage rates have gone down and I'm refinancing shortly and expect to save between $50 and $100 a month in mortgage payments, which means another $1000 in income per year 3) I can expense the interest on my mortgage payments and amortize the cost of the suite so I basically never get income on my tax returns. Obviously, 10-20 years from now I won't be able to do it since I'll be paying a lot more principal rather than interest and depreciation has a limit. I can also expense one flight back home to visit friends under the guise of "property maintenance." 4) While the real estate prices are low, rental rates have shot up. My previous renters paid $150 a month less. My current tenants were shocked I wasn't charging condo fees on TOP of the rent. 5) The neighborhood my condo is in is going through some major upgrades, there are some public venues and new malls being built in the area. This will undoubtedly drive up the price of my condo in a few short years. As it is an older building in a neighborhood that bans high-rises, I suspect in a decade or so, the high-rises will start to encroach on the area and developers will want the land from these smaller, older buildings. If I could sell to a developer, I could make a ton of $, so I'm planning to hold out for a while.
  8. GPs can do corticosteroid injections, but most will limit themselves only to large joints (shoulder and knee). Rheumatologists often also do steroid injections, and they can do it in very small joints. Sports med docs (2+1 FM training) will also do the more advanced stuff. May I ask what the issue is?
  9. LOL, sounds like a winning situation to me! I got kicked out of the OR once by a very emotionally volatile surgeon - half an hour earlier, he had praised me to everyone in the room and said I was destined to be a surgeon, but then I failed to name some stupid nerve, at which point he decided I had no business assisting. He told me to "get the hell out" of his OR, I said, "cool beans" and headed out to enjoy nice May weather early.
  10. I agree. Things happen. Even if you don't have a "legitimate" excuse (car trouble, whatever), EVERYONE has been late somewhere at some point. I suspect this person lives in a glass house. It only becomes a professionalism issue when it's a pattern. I can think of DOZENS of times when I was on time for something, but the staff or lecturer wasn't. There's always some excuse "but they are so busy and important!" Well, you KNOW you have a lecture in the morning, if you have to round beforehand, then come in earlier on that day.
  11. I'm pretty indifferent about cars. Function-wise, my dream is a small 4WD SUV, like the one I have now (Suzuki Grand Vitara), but with a more powerful engine and jacked up with all sorts of cool stuff for offroading - winch, chains, roof rack storage, etc. I would like my car to be able to tow a sleeper trailer or a boat without trouble. As a couple, I think it's a great combo to have 4WD vehicle with room for storage for outdoor pursuits/winter driving and a second vehicle that's very economical. My husband has a decrepit Honda Civic, when it goes the way of the dodo bird, we'll be getting something small. I had a Toyota Yaris before, the gas mileage was amazing, it's the perfect commuter's car. My husband's 6'0" and 220 lbs, though, and he was just about scraping the ceiling in that car, so we may have to go with just a slightly bigger car. Maybe a little VW Jetta Clean Diesel.
  12. I've heard U of S only does about 1:7.
  13. Old enough to go to med school, still a virgin, but obviously not for religious/moral reasons or else you wouldn't ever consider selling your virginity for cash. Intriguing!
  14. You absolutely CAN transfer from a 2-yr program to a 5-yr, I know someone who did. That was a few years ago, so I cannot tell you how exactly it was done or whether the same route is an option, but it's possible. Look into it.
×
×
  • Create New...