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frenchpress

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  1. Sad
    frenchpress got a reaction from trimethoprim in planning on taking Athabasca courses to strengthen gpa for application... thoughts?   
    The other consideration you may be missing: if you can only get strong grades in easy gpa booster courses, and cannot figure out a way to succeed in more difficult courses, you may find you really struggle in medical school. Sure, maybe if the only reason you have a 3.5 average is that you haven’t been applying yourself, and maybe you could suddenly change your behaviour and start excelling once in medical school. But if you’re not used to pushing yourself, that approach could easily backfire.
  2. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from nocturnal in Should I give up on med school? Am I being delusional? Need honesty.   
    I agree with the above advice that you still have routes to Med school, and to take it a semester at a time and see how the next semester goes as a place to start. In fact, given your struggles, it might actually be a good idea to do a part-time semester with fewer courses and work your way up to doing full time again. 
    Your need to be realistic about what it will take to turn things around. It’s not enough to just work harder at school. You need to realistically reflect on how you got into a position where you allowed yourself to fail so many courses multiple semesters in a row without making many changes - for example, why didn’t you withdraw when you realized you were failing, especially after that first semester when you must have seen it coming. Or if you didn’t see it coming, why not? Because doing the same thing over and over again and hoping for a different result is delusional thinking. If you don’t have a meaningful plan of action or make meaningful changes to your habits, it’s not going to be different this time either. And learning is a skill - most people aren’t just going to become good at studying overnight. You may need to ask for help, go to office hours, hire a tutor, etc. It may take you awhile to get the hang of it. You may also want to consider talking to a counsellor at your school, and exploring whether you have some other mental health concerns that may be underlying some of your struggles.

    I believe strongly that anyone can learn how to learn, and I’m sure that includes you. But it’s gonna to take a lot of hard work on yourself and on your studies. 
  3. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from Acrobatic-5368 in NAQ EC   
    Exposure in a hospital doesn’t matter - you’ll note if you read through the help guide that exposure to medical settings does not come up as an evaluation criteria. Choose whichever NAQ entries the show the most length of commitment and most significant responsibility, and that most fulfill those criteria they are evaluating on. 
  4. Like
    frenchpress reacted to QasinCucumber in How long to receive transcripts from Ontario?   
    Good point, I realized I should've contacted my school after posting this. My school only has delivery by mail actually but they say the promised delivery time should still be somewhat accurate. I've decided to just order it now before any more hesitation/delays. Thanks  
  5. Like
    frenchpress reacted to whatdoido in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    Sorry, but how badly you want something has very little correlation with whether or not you "deserve" it over any other applicant and certainly not whether you'll be any good at it. Many people dream about becoming famous actors or singers, too, and they are constantly beaten out by the millions of others who share the same dream as well as those who were just sort of given the opportunity. Barring nepotism/unfair advantages, it's neither fair nor unfair, it's just the way it is. Sad, fine, but it's foolish to suggest that you need to be bouncing up and down at the thought of practicing medicine to be any more qualified to be a good doctor than someone who sees it as simply a job. You wouldn't trust an engineer who is building a bridge that will support dozens of cars over a river because he sees his job as simply a job? I don't care whether or not he's passionate about calculating the load a bridge can take. I care that he's able to effectively do his job. I know plenty of people I spent undergrad with who wanted nothing more than to be doctors who would be downright awful at it, either because they're not very good at being empathetic, or because they simply weren't very good at science. It is sad that they can't fulfill their dreams, yes, but I'd rather have a doctor who had the academic rigour necessary to properly diagnose me than someone who was admitted simply because they are "so intensely passionate about helping others and practicing medicine." If it comes down to two people at the top of the interview list, then yes, it's a coin flip, but there's a 99% chance they're equally capable and deserving regardless of their differing passion.
    From personal anecdotes as well as dozens of hours reading into this, doctors who hate coming to work are usually those who are trapped by debt (not an enormous problem after a couple of years of practice in Canada), those in inhumanely demanding residencies or specialities that I personally will never go near, and those who went into it thinking it was their predestined magical fate and get slapped by the harsh bureaucratic and futile reality of medicine (hint: it's not all that great, no matter how much ~passion~ you have).
    Anyways, I'm not sure why the idea of "coasting" aggravates you? I prefaced that several times in my previous posts by saying it's still a LOT of hard work. There's still an enormous volume of material to learn and getting a 70% means you know the majority of it. Just because I'm not going to subscribe to the ridiculous notion that my entire life needs to be living and breathing medicine and studying at every second or doing observerships or research or extra readings or extra time in the clinic et cetera doesn't mean I'm going to make a bad doctor. I don't need that stuff for the job I want to do, so why do it? That's exactly the kind of awful rhetoric that lead to the foolish idea that we need to be martyrs for our patients and for the art of medicine. The same ideals and notions that hospital admins (who love the incredibly cheap resident labour) and attendings (who went through the same thing and are bitter and want to dish it out on the next generation) perpetuate that lead to the inhumane residencies, the 80 hour work weeks, the day after day of 24-hour call with no sleep, the extremely high burnout, depression, job dissatisfaction, and suicide. Almost every other field has invariably better work-life balance- why can't we? I have a life outside of medicine and I enjoy it very much and you're damn right I'm not going to spend one second longer than I need to learning to be a good doctor. If that aggravates you, then I really don't care, and you're exactly part of the problem I dreaded when I thought about a career in medicine.
    Medicine is a job. For some it's a passion, for others a calling, but at the end of the day, it's a job. A stable, high paying one that requires a lot of training, intelligence, and discipline. There's ample time to kick out bad seeds, either during the extremely competitive admissions process, during medical school, residency... *especially* in today's hypercompetitive system. If you're in an MD program, and especially if you successfully complete residency, it means you more likely than not have the skills and character required to be a good doctor. I highly doubt anyone who would genuinely make a bad doctor could brute force their way through premed, volunteering/ECs, the MCAT, applications, ethics tests, interviews, med school, and residency. But if you think everybody in medicine is just teeming with constant uncontainable passion and excitement, you're sorely mistaken and living in quite an idyllic world.
  6. Like
    frenchpress reacted to Snowmen in Would you red flag an applicant who has been seen breaking COVID etiquette?   
    If you're a clerk and therefore seeing patients, and you still decide to engage in the behaviors you describe (parties, etc.), you totally should get red flagged. Clear lack of judgement and professionalism.
    When it comes to behaviors that are allowed under current rules (ie: going to a restaurant, seeing a couple of friends, etc.), I think that's fine.
  7. Like
    frenchpress reacted to pyridoxal-phosphate in Upper year med students - how do you study?   
    Not all of them, but some will definitely be in that scenario style format. Although the topic/level will be adjusted for the first/second year level, so more reasonable than the progress test haha. 
  8. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from honeymoon in Upper year med students - how do you study?   
    By the end of 2nd year I had totally moved away from attending/watching lectures, or even reviewing the slides much for that matter. I would skim them and add some random ‘high yield’ content to my flash card decks for cramming the week before exams. But I focused most of my time on reading around the ‘theme’ of the week using a mix of textbooks and Osmosis / Online Med Ed videos and resources. Eventually I started to realize that every topic / disease has all the same things to learn about, but what’s emphasized for each might vary: etiolgy/pathophysiology, clinical presentation (physical exam and history), management, etc etc. I built up my own summary notes using roughly that format that I’ve been expanding on in clerkship, and that acts as a bit of a quick reference guide for me.
    You won’t be able to memorize all the material the first time. If you cram and review you’ll be able to remember a surprising amount for the test - over time it gets easier to figure out what kind of details matter for the test vs. matter for actually practicing medicine. And then you’ll forgot most of it. And then you’ll review it again in clerkship, and again for electives and in residency. Stuff you use a lot will stick. Stuff you don’t you’ll look up. It is definitely overwhelming. It does get easier! 
    Edit: To your question about 'active methods', I'll add that doing practice clinical questions, like those available for Step 2/LMCC studying, was really helpful to me. I started in first year with Osmosis questions, because it was easy to pick ones focused on a specific topic, even though they aren't always the best quality questions. And eventually I started looking at other resources and question banks. Early on I often found this overwhelming, because I often got nearly every question wrong because there was so much I didn't know. But over time, I found forcing myself to just try to do them and think about the clinical presentations really helpful, and information tends to stick a lot better for me when I learn it in that sort of problem solving context.  
  9. Like
    frenchpress reacted to shikimate in Upper year med students - how do you study?   
    Back some years ago lecture recordings, textbook and notes would be the best way to study, but with advent of YouTube things have been flipped upside down. One thing you realize quickly is most lecturers suck, they can't explain things well, or the way they explain things is fragmented, illogical. So more and more I advocate people using online resources that actually explain things logically.
    Previous poster mentioned Osmosis, it's a GREAT resource that make exceptional videos, which explain concepts very clearly and concisely, highlighting high yield topics. You can even use it to study some Royal College exam topics, that's how good they are. Not to mention there are now numerous videos showing you physical exam maneuvers. 
    Multi-media is the key to remembering key info, you should read about it, talk about it, look at it, and hear about it, or even do it with your own hands, then you'll retain it. 
    Another dubious distinction of med school lecture is they never tell you what's high yield on the exam and in practice. For exam purposes what's high yield can be found in USMLE First Aid book. That book is very dense but all the topics they mention in there have been distilled by generations of med students. Use that book to filter out things you must know, things you should know, and things that are nice to know, they supplement with YouTube, Wikipedia, medscape or UpToDate if you want to learn more about it
     
  10. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from Stressedfajita in Partial Course Load: How big of a disadvantage is it?   
    I feel like I answer this question once a month, haha, it’s a major source of anxiety. Yes, UBC accepts people who don’t take full course loads. Lots of people have had lighter course loads, myself included, who were admitted.
    They do expect you to demonstrate that you can handle hard work. There is a place on the application where you are asked to speak to why you took a part-time course load - there you can explain that in addition to 4 courses a term, you worked part-time. That’s probably more than sufficient. 
  11. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from ShadesofCyan in UBC full course load requirement   
    You don’t have much space, to say much beyond ‘I took part-time terms because x,y,z reasons,’ but you should provide what explanation you can in that section. And then just make as strong as an application as you can, pick a good academic reference, etc. You won’t be asked this sort of thing at the interview - it’s an MMI only, no panel.
  12. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from ShadesofCyan in Partial Course Load: How big of a disadvantage is it?   
    I feel like I answer this question once a month, haha, it’s a major source of anxiety. Yes, UBC accepts people who don’t take full course loads. Lots of people have had lighter course loads, myself included, who were admitted.
    They do expect you to demonstrate that you can handle hard work. There is a place on the application where you are asked to speak to why you took a part-time course load - there you can explain that in addition to 4 courses a term, you worked part-time. That’s probably more than sufficient. 
  13. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from Ginny Midgeon in Upper year med students - how do you study?   
    By the end of 2nd year I had totally moved away from attending/watching lectures, or even reviewing the slides much for that matter. I would skim them and add some random ‘high yield’ content to my flash card decks for cramming the week before exams. But I focused most of my time on reading around the ‘theme’ of the week using a mix of textbooks and Osmosis / Online Med Ed videos and resources. Eventually I started to realize that every topic / disease has all the same things to learn about, but what’s emphasized for each might vary: etiolgy/pathophysiology, clinical presentation (physical exam and history), management, etc etc. I built up my own summary notes using roughly that format that I’ve been expanding on in clerkship, and that acts as a bit of a quick reference guide for me.
    You won’t be able to memorize all the material the first time. If you cram and review you’ll be able to remember a surprising amount for the test - over time it gets easier to figure out what kind of details matter for the test vs. matter for actually practicing medicine. And then you’ll forgot most of it. And then you’ll review it again in clerkship, and again for electives and in residency. Stuff you use a lot will stick. Stuff you don’t you’ll look up. It is definitely overwhelming. It does get easier! 
    Edit: To your question about 'active methods', I'll add that doing practice clinical questions, like those available for Step 2/LMCC studying, was really helpful to me. I started in first year with Osmosis questions, because it was easy to pick ones focused on a specific topic, even though they aren't always the best quality questions. And eventually I started looking at other resources and question banks. Early on I often found this overwhelming, because I often got nearly every question wrong because there was so much I didn't know. But over time, I found forcing myself to just try to do them and think about the clinical presentations really helpful, and information tends to stick a lot better for me when I learn it in that sort of problem solving context.  
  14. Thanks
    frenchpress got a reaction from attyb1992 in Upper year med students - how do you study?   
    By the end of 2nd year I had totally moved away from attending/watching lectures, or even reviewing the slides much for that matter. I would skim them and add some random ‘high yield’ content to my flash card decks for cramming the week before exams. But I focused most of my time on reading around the ‘theme’ of the week using a mix of textbooks and Osmosis / Online Med Ed videos and resources. Eventually I started to realize that every topic / disease has all the same things to learn about, but what’s emphasized for each might vary: etiolgy/pathophysiology, clinical presentation (physical exam and history), management, etc etc. I built up my own summary notes using roughly that format that I’ve been expanding on in clerkship, and that acts as a bit of a quick reference guide for me.
    You won’t be able to memorize all the material the first time. If you cram and review you’ll be able to remember a surprising amount for the test - over time it gets easier to figure out what kind of details matter for the test vs. matter for actually practicing medicine. And then you’ll forgot most of it. And then you’ll review it again in clerkship, and again for electives and in residency. Stuff you use a lot will stick. Stuff you don’t you’ll look up. It is definitely overwhelming. It does get easier! 
    Edit: To your question about 'active methods', I'll add that doing practice clinical questions, like those available for Step 2/LMCC studying, was really helpful to me. I started in first year with Osmosis questions, because it was easy to pick ones focused on a specific topic, even though they aren't always the best quality questions. And eventually I started looking at other resources and question banks. Early on I often found this overwhelming, because I often got nearly every question wrong because there was so much I didn't know. But over time, I found forcing myself to just try to do them and think about the clinical presentations really helpful, and information tends to stick a lot better for me when I learn it in that sort of problem solving context.  
  15. Thanks
    frenchpress got a reaction from PeanutButter1 in Organization for Non-formal Activities   
    Agreed. Also need to balance length of commitment, etc. An activity you did for many, many years that says a lot about you likely better than a more recent one with far fewer hours.
  16. Like
    frenchpress reacted to Bambi in How important is it to have an online presence as a medical student?   
    In my experience, it is neither necessary, relevant, helpful nor important.
  17. Like
    frenchpress reacted to Bambi in Bad Grade   
    Ignore it, we were all there, just move on and put it behind you. It’s not going to control your life unless you make it that way.
  18. Confused
    frenchpress reacted to Pterygoid in Waitlist Party 2020   
    well... it looks like someone was admitted with a history of unprofessional conduct (https://www.**DELETED**.com/r/UBC/comments/ig48w7/incoming_ubc_medicine_student_with_history_of/)
    Im not sure if UBC Med is/was aware. **Edit there's rumors going around that they'll be removed from the program. However, nothing official.
     
  19. Like
    frenchpress reacted to JohnGrisham in is it easy for GIM do outpatient full time in ontario?   
    Yes, again, Hospitalits service in most metropolitan areas = FM.  Then GIM docs cover wards with more acutely ill patients - i.e. ones that need more active work-up, mgmt, (i.e. NSTEMI for medical mgmt, ICU/HAU transfers to the ward, severe hyponatremia, DKAs etc).  At most hospitals, both services(hospitalist and IM) do consultation admits from the ED. It is up to ED to triage who they are sending to.  Then if a patient starts to go south while on hospitalist service, they could consult IM, and IM would either take over as MRP, or provide guidance. Or if its severely crashing, you can consult ICU/HAU directly and they would take the patient.  In academic hospitals, the only distinction is often that the IM service is run by residents/med students under an IM attending. 
     
     
  20. Thanks
    frenchpress got a reaction from Fast_Layne in term 1 formative?   
    edit: I just double checked entrada and realized that this is actually official now and I had missed the part about the MCQs, so updating my previously reply which confirmed only the OSCEs.
    Yes - it’s been stated in the Aug 6th key messages that term 1 exams for years 1 and 2 are mandatory formative, but starting in 2021 (ie term 2) the plan is back to summative. Formative exams you can’t ‘fail’, but you can still be marked as requiring academic support if you’re too many standard deviations below the mean. 
  21. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from lovetoread in is it easy for GIM do outpatient full time in ontario?   
    Agreed, and GP hospitalist service is growing rapidly in our area. Community GPs or dedicated GP hospitalists are covering the vast majority of the medical inpatient wards at the mid-sized hospitals I am working in regularly,  with general IM and various subspecialty IM acting as a consulting service. I have seen IM docs occasionally covering hospitalist shifts, but this is more because of a shortage of docs / recent reallocations because of COVID, not because its where they want to work or where their skills are most needed. 
  22. Like
    frenchpress reacted to JohnGrisham in is it easy for GIM do outpatient full time in ontario?   
    sub-spec waitlists are long, and you often don't need to send to a cardiologist when you can send to GIM who has an interest in cardio for example, who can see them much sooner. 
    Hospitalist isn't going anywhere, the types of patients ED sends to hospitalists service v.s. IM service are disticnt. Hospitalist patients are usually more chronically ill and decompanated for longer term stays etc. No sense in IM taking over those patients when they won't have much to offer them. Nor will they want to, after going through 5 years of intense training to waste all that training essentially.
  23. Thanks
    frenchpress got a reaction from honeymoon in term 1 formative?   
    edit: I just double checked entrada and realized that this is actually official now and I had missed the part about the MCQs, so updating my previously reply which confirmed only the OSCEs.
    Yes - it’s been stated in the Aug 6th key messages that term 1 exams for years 1 and 2 are mandatory formative, but starting in 2021 (ie term 2) the plan is back to summative. Formative exams you can’t ‘fail’, but you can still be marked as requiring academic support if you’re too many standard deviations below the mean. 
  24. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from Fast_Layne in People accepted to UBC Med, please share your Ecs?   
    UBC doesn’t care what your ECs are specifically, and they don’t need to be related to medicine or health. But they do look for how you demonstrate  qualities like leadership, ability to work with others, service to your community, etc.  You could check out the criteria on the help guide to see a bit more detail. Remember that paid work counts as well, at least for UBC.  If you want to see a wide range of things people do, try reading through the accepted applicants posts pinned to the top of the UBC page. 
    So I agree with the above advice that you should do things you’re interested in and can commit to, and that can let you demonstrate those qualities. This can include a lot of things like hobbies, sports, etc., it’s not all classic premed things like volunteering with marginalized communities. And completely disagree with suggestion that you need any kind of consultation with an application service, particularly one that offers paid services that they’ll try to sell you. Enjoy your first year of university. 
  25. Like
    frenchpress got a reaction from uvicstudent in NAQ - Pharmacy Residency Experience   
    UBC generally does not want you to split up entries unless you really had different responsibilities or it really was a different position. People do this sometimes, but it’s generally advised against. And 8 entries is really too many. I don’t think it really gains you anything, and you’re actually kind of short changing yourself, because it will just read like a series of many short term jobs of 1-2 months. 
    You don’t need to give the details of every specific rotation, just highlight the key responsibilities across rotations that speak to the criteria UBC evaluates the NAQs on (leadership, working with others, etc.). You can use the ‘clarify hours’ box to get in some of that context without wasting characters in the description. E.g. Use that box to explain that the 2500+ hours is split into rotations: ICU 250 hours, etc. etc. And then use the description box to highlight your responsibilities and the things you actually want to be assessed on. 
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