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Intrepid86

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  1. Thanks
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from Meningocoele in How to get over your enemy's success?   
    Comparison is the thief of joy.
  2. Like
    Intrepid86 reacted to Rationalistlens in Is family medicine really that bad?   
    You are right that bad outcomes of course happen in other specialties as well. But that was not even my argument. My argument was that as a FP,  who only has superficial knowledge about everything due to the very nature of generalism involved, you are making decisions for things you do not have an expertise in. The gravity of it does not hit you when are you are a FM resident in hospital with supervisors to review your cases but only when you are MRP on your own with a waiting room full of patients you must see in less than 15 mins each and $33 each (being liberal here with 15 mins) and monthly expenses to pay to keep your clinic afloat.
    ER doctors see catastrophes daily, that is their training. An average family doctor probably only diagnosed PE once or twice (that is if you were lucky or spent half your 2 year training in ER or did that elective out of interest on hematology ward) in their training and is expected to make sure in 10 mins without access to stat Ct and stat d dimers that one walk-in pt with pleuritic chest pain is not having a PE before sending them home. Especially when you dont see chest pains daily in your practice and hence dont really rememeber WELLS criteria on the back of your hand so you have to excuse yourself from pt encounter to do the score on your cell phone before telling them “i think I am concerned about a PE, you should go to ER to get it checked out” and then it turns out they did not  have a PE anyway. And must I remind you of the joy when that pt comes for follow up to you and reminds you, the lowly GP who probably never treated a PE in his life but was making decisions on suspecting/diagnosing it, “hey doc, i waited full 2 hrs in ER, they told me you are fine and sent me home, you were just worried for no reason.” And yes, all that “worry” for $33 for that encounter including the delays it caused on your schedule and other unhappy patients because you wanted to take time to properly reach the right decision for this patient’s discharge to home or ER.
     
    My message: Stay away from FM. 
     
  3. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from oneday1 in Not happy in medicine.. Not sure what to do?   
    Training is finite, and your current rotation is temporary. This perspective is important regardless if you are a student or resident. You will not enjoy everything equally. It is not required or expected. You thought your IM experience would be one thing, but it turned out to be another. Your expectations of medicine are starting to hit up against some of the realities. This is normal.
    When things get difficult, it is helpful to keep in mind that most personal struggles boil down to one binary decision; you either keep going, or you quit. This might sound callous, but it is by far the most important decision to make, and the decision most people are actually wavering on in their minds, whether they realize it or not. You always have the option to do one or the other, so make the decision first, then you'll realize things get simpler after that initial mental hurdle.
    For the sake of discussion, let's say you keep going. Now make the next important distinction. What things do you have control over, and what are the things you don't? It is wasted effort and energy to worry about things you have little or no control over, such as which rotation you're on, who the attending is, how they act, etc. What you do control is your own work ethic, attitude, and response to criticism. This type of stoic reflection is helpful to peel the layers of a problem, and also for one's own mental health, but it is skipped by 90% of people.
  4. Like
    Intrepid86 reacted to blah1234 in Any family med docs regret switching careers as a non trad?   
    Would you be able to elaborate further on your goals that require a significant income (e.g. buy a 1M cottage home) and the potential timeline you would like to reach it by (e.g. At age 40)? While for most people I would counsel them on the merits of doing the job out of interest, I think in your case there seems to be a component that may be determined fairly accurately through financial modelling. As a non-trad myself the math doesn't always work out if you have earlier life goals. I think for many people you do come out ahead in medicine but it is often at the tail end of your career rather than the midpoint where you could be equivalent (although you have mentioned your career caps out at 90K so perhaps not for you).
  5. Haha
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from premed72 in #MedBikini   
    I think this "study" was largely an excuse for the mostly male authors to creep their female colleagues in bikinis. The pressure to publish something then compelled them to write this regrettable paper.
  6. Haha
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from Butterfly_ in #MedBikini   
    I think this "study" was largely an excuse for the mostly male authors to creep their female colleagues in bikinis. The pressure to publish something then compelled them to write this regrettable paper.
  7. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from psk.taengoo in Career satisfaction in family medicine   
    To best answer your question, it requires a better understanding of what family medicine really is. The following is my perspective. Others may disagree, but to each their own.
    The hallmark of specialists is knowledge. The hallmark of family physicians is communication. As a family doctor, a large part of the job is providing empathy and patient education. The medicine is important, but almost secondary. Your greatest asset is the strength and trust of the therapeutic relationship you have with patients as their primary care provider. When a patient is sick, they will want to see you. After a patient consults a specialist, they will still want your opinion on the recommended course of action. When a patient is dying and nothing more can be done, they and their loved ones will want your sympathy and guidance to feel like they aren't alone. This therapeutic relationship is your privilege, your wheelhouse, and ultimately, a significant part of where your job satisfaction comes from.
    On a very practical level, family medicine is about improving patients through incremental change, the sum of which over time leads to improved quality of life. Let's say this is a game of baseball. As a family doctor, you probably won't be the star batter hitting home runs. You will be hitting singles all day. Is it sexy? no. Is it progress? yes. Is it needed? yes.
    You are correct; FM can be a grind. Feeling under appreciated at some point is common. There are patients who will not be grateful despite your best efforts. There will be vague complaints for which you will have no clear idea what is going on. 20% of your patients will feel like 80% of your work. These and other daily challenges will all demand your care and attention. Family medicine not suitable for everyone, but like every other field of medicine, it has both its satisfying and less than satisfying aspects.
    I hope this helps.
    Good luck in your future studies.
  8. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from readytostresseat in Not happy in medicine.. Not sure what to do?   
    Training is finite, and your current rotation is temporary. This perspective is important regardless if you are a student or resident. You will not enjoy everything equally. It is not required or expected. You thought your IM experience would be one thing, but it turned out to be another. Your expectations of medicine are starting to hit up against some of the realities. This is normal.
    When things get difficult, it is helpful to keep in mind that most personal struggles boil down to one binary decision; you either keep going, or you quit. This might sound callous, but it is by far the most important decision to make, and the decision most people are actually wavering on in their minds, whether they realize it or not. You always have the option to do one or the other, so make the decision first, then you'll realize things get simpler after that initial mental hurdle.
    For the sake of discussion, let's say you keep going. Now make the next important distinction. What things do you have control over, and what are the things you don't? It is wasted effort and energy to worry about things you have little or no control over, such as which rotation you're on, who the attending is, how they act, etc. What you do control is your own work ethic, attitude, and response to criticism. This type of stoic reflection is helpful to peel the layers of a problem, and also for one's own mental health, but it is skipped by 90% of people.
  9. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from MedicineLCS in Not happy in medicine.. Not sure what to do?   
    Training is finite, and your current rotation is temporary. This perspective is important regardless if you are a student or resident. You will not enjoy everything equally. It is not required or expected. You thought your IM experience would be one thing, but it turned out to be another. Your expectations of medicine are starting to hit up against some of the realities. This is normal.
    When things get difficult, it is helpful to keep in mind that most personal struggles boil down to one binary decision; you either keep going, or you quit. This might sound callous, but it is by far the most important decision to make, and the decision most people are actually wavering on in their minds, whether they realize it or not. You always have the option to do one or the other, so make the decision first, then you'll realize things get simpler after that initial mental hurdle.
    For the sake of discussion, let's say you keep going. Now make the next important distinction. What things do you have control over, and what are the things you don't? It is wasted effort and energy to worry about things you have little or no control over, such as which rotation you're on, who the attending is, how they act, etc. What you do control is your own work ethic, attitude, and response to criticism. This type of stoic reflection is helpful to peel the layers of a problem, and also for one's own mental health, but it is skipped by 90% of people.
  10. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from vms in Not happy in medicine.. Not sure what to do?   
    Training is finite, and your current rotation is temporary. This perspective is important regardless if you are a student or resident. You will not enjoy everything equally. It is not required or expected. You thought your IM experience would be one thing, but it turned out to be another. Your expectations of medicine are starting to hit up against some of the realities. This is normal.
    When things get difficult, it is helpful to keep in mind that most personal struggles boil down to one binary decision; you either keep going, or you quit. This might sound callous, but it is by far the most important decision to make, and the decision most people are actually wavering on in their minds, whether they realize it or not. You always have the option to do one or the other, so make the decision first, then you'll realize things get simpler after that initial mental hurdle.
    For the sake of discussion, let's say you keep going. Now make the next important distinction. What things do you have control over, and what are the things you don't? It is wasted effort and energy to worry about things you have little or no control over, such as which rotation you're on, who the attending is, how they act, etc. What you do control is your own work ethic, attitude, and response to criticism. This type of stoic reflection is helpful to peel the layers of a problem, and also for one's own mental health, but it is skipped by 90% of people.
  11. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from trimethoprim in Are residents actually happy?   
    Residency is temporary. I suggest you focus on what area of medicine you ultimately want to practice in, rather than the quality of life during your training program. That being said, it would be hard to beat a Family Medicine residency for work life balance.
  12. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from Hanmari in Not happy in medicine.. Not sure what to do?   
    Training is finite, and your current rotation is temporary. This perspective is important regardless if you are a student or resident. You will not enjoy everything equally. It is not required or expected. You thought your IM experience would be one thing, but it turned out to be another. Your expectations of medicine are starting to hit up against some of the realities. This is normal.
    When things get difficult, it is helpful to keep in mind that most personal struggles boil down to one binary decision; you either keep going, or you quit. This might sound callous, but it is by far the most important decision to make, and the decision most people are actually wavering on in their minds, whether they realize it or not. You always have the option to do one or the other, so make the decision first, then you'll realize things get simpler after that initial mental hurdle.
    For the sake of discussion, let's say you keep going. Now make the next important distinction. What things do you have control over, and what are the things you don't? It is wasted effort and energy to worry about things you have little or no control over, such as which rotation you're on, who the attending is, how they act, etc. What you do control is your own work ethic, attitude, and response to criticism. This type of stoic reflection is helpful to peel the layers of a problem, and also for one's own mental health, but it is skipped by 90% of people.
  13. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from petitmonstre111 in Not happy in medicine.. Not sure what to do?   
    Training is finite, and your current rotation is temporary. This perspective is important regardless if you are a student or resident. You will not enjoy everything equally. It is not required or expected. You thought your IM experience would be one thing, but it turned out to be another. Your expectations of medicine are starting to hit up against some of the realities. This is normal.
    When things get difficult, it is helpful to keep in mind that most personal struggles boil down to one binary decision; you either keep going, or you quit. This might sound callous, but it is by far the most important decision to make, and the decision most people are actually wavering on in their minds, whether they realize it or not. You always have the option to do one or the other, so make the decision first, then you'll realize things get simpler after that initial mental hurdle.
    For the sake of discussion, let's say you keep going. Now make the next important distinction. What things do you have control over, and what are the things you don't? It is wasted effort and energy to worry about things you have little or no control over, such as which rotation you're on, who the attending is, how they act, etc. What you do control is your own work ethic, attitude, and response to criticism. This type of stoic reflection is helpful to peel the layers of a problem, and also for one's own mental health, but it is skipped by 90% of people.
  14. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from LostLamb in Are residents actually happy?   
    As one of my old FM preceptors put it, family medicine is as easy or difficult as you make it. As a practicing family doctor, I agree with that.
    As with many other jobs, it's relatively easy to be adequate, harder to be good, and challenging to be excellent /exceptional. A two year FM residency is short. Everyone knows that. Like all other residencies, you get out what you put in. More effort up front usually means less needed later. Because there's an eventual range of interests, ability, and practice preferences, there also exists an abundance of clinical resources, transition advice (e.g., First five years of practice), mentorship networks etc. for those seeking it. By far the most important thing is to have a positive attitude towards self learning and improvement that will serve you well throughout your career, no matter what stage of career you're in.
    As a family doctor, if a patient likes you, that is already more than half the battle, even if you did nothing else. That might sound dumb, perplexing, and possibly even wrong, but it's not. If your patient doesn't like you as their primary care provider, then the chance of them taking your preventative advice is low, as will be their engagement on any investigation and treatment plans proposed. Clearly, the more you can do for the patient on your own, the better. However, if you need to refer out, then refer out, because doing something that's not within your comfort or ability will be even worse. If you need to refer out all the time for something that most of your colleagues are not, then you might be falling below the standards of knowledge for your specialty, so the onus would be on you to rectify that.
  15. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from LostLamb in Are residents actually happy?   
    Residency is temporary. I suggest you focus on what area of medicine you ultimately want to practice in, rather than the quality of life during your training program. That being said, it would be hard to beat a Family Medicine residency for work life balance.
  16. Like
    Intrepid86 reacted to JohnGrisham in Ask questions about family medicine here   
    Because in Canada, they don't want Family doctors going into only niche-focused areas with laser precision. We know many will do just EM, or just hospitalist, but they ideally want people who will still do full-scope family medicine clinics and primary care.   There is nothing wrong with going into EM or doing mainly hospitalists after a FM residency, programs just want to be able to say they are recruiting the best applicants who will want to do full-scope practice.   

    Its a moot point when we need FM docs to do all those roles anyways, so by someone "only" doing EM or hospitalists, isn't as if there isn't a need for that as well! So it's just optics and semantics, in a zero sum game.
  17. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from Anaik in How much sleep do you get?   
    Sleep is for wimps and dermatologists.
  18. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from CanMedMedMed in Career satisfaction in family medicine   
    To best answer your question, it requires a better understanding of what family medicine really is. The following is my perspective. Others may disagree, but to each their own.
    The hallmark of specialists is knowledge. The hallmark of family physicians is communication. As a family doctor, a large part of the job is providing empathy and patient education. The medicine is important, but almost secondary. Your greatest asset is the strength and trust of the therapeutic relationship you have with patients as their primary care provider. When a patient is sick, they will want to see you. After a patient consults a specialist, they will still want your opinion on the recommended course of action. When a patient is dying and nothing more can be done, they and their loved ones will want your sympathy and guidance to feel like they aren't alone. This therapeutic relationship is your privilege, your wheelhouse, and ultimately, a significant part of where your job satisfaction comes from.
    On a very practical level, family medicine is about improving patients through incremental change, the sum of which over time leads to improved quality of life. Let's say this is a game of baseball. As a family doctor, you probably won't be the star batter hitting home runs. You will be hitting singles all day. Is it sexy? no. Is it progress? yes. Is it needed? yes.
    You are correct; FM can be a grind. Feeling under appreciated at some point is common. There are patients who will not be grateful despite your best efforts. There will be vague complaints for which you will have no clear idea what is going on. 20% of your patients will feel like 80% of your work. These and other daily challenges will all demand your care and attention. Family medicine not suitable for everyone, but like every other field of medicine, it has both its satisfying and less than satisfying aspects.
    I hope this helps.
    Good luck in your future studies.
  19. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from frenchpress in weird feeling   
    There's too much preoccupation with age on this forum. It's not a big deal or impressive unless you start after age 40, or you're Brian Levy, former CEO of Radio Shack.
    https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/second-act-former-ceo-of-radioshack-now-an-er-doctor-on-frontlines-of-covid-19-fight
    Had a shift with him once. Great guy.
  20. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from medisforme in Career satisfaction in family medicine   
    To best answer your question, it requires a better understanding of what family medicine really is. The following is my perspective. Others may disagree, but to each their own.
    The hallmark of specialists is knowledge. The hallmark of family physicians is communication. As a family doctor, a large part of the job is providing empathy and patient education. The medicine is important, but almost secondary. Your greatest asset is the strength and trust of the therapeutic relationship you have with patients as their primary care provider. When a patient is sick, they will want to see you. After a patient consults a specialist, they will still want your opinion on the recommended course of action. When a patient is dying and nothing more can be done, they and their loved ones will want your sympathy and guidance to feel like they aren't alone. This therapeutic relationship is your privilege, your wheelhouse, and ultimately, a significant part of where your job satisfaction comes from.
    On a very practical level, family medicine is about improving patients through incremental change, the sum of which over time leads to improved quality of life. Let's say this is a game of baseball. As a family doctor, you probably won't be the star batter hitting home runs. You will be hitting singles all day. Is it sexy? no. Is it progress? yes. Is it needed? yes.
    You are correct; FM can be a grind. Feeling under appreciated at some point is common. There are patients who will not be grateful despite your best efforts. There will be vague complaints for which you will have no clear idea what is going on. 20% of your patients will feel like 80% of your work. These and other daily challenges will all demand your care and attention. Family medicine not suitable for everyone, but like every other field of medicine, it has both its satisfying and less than satisfying aspects.
    I hope this helps.
    Good luck in your future studies.
  21. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from Organomegaly in Career satisfaction in family medicine   
    That's true. Family doctors can certainly niche their practices into something more specialized, but I feel it's not really answering the question that was posed. The OP is largely referring to career satisfaction derived from family medicine in its most traditional, comprehensive care form.
  22. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from powdermonkey13 in Career satisfaction in family medicine   
    To best answer your question, it requires a better understanding of what family medicine really is. The following is my perspective. Others may disagree, but to each their own.
    The hallmark of specialists is knowledge. The hallmark of family physicians is communication. As a family doctor, a large part of the job is providing empathy and patient education. The medicine is important, but almost secondary. Your greatest asset is the strength and trust of the therapeutic relationship you have with patients as their primary care provider. When a patient is sick, they will want to see you. After a patient consults a specialist, they will still want your opinion on the recommended course of action. When a patient is dying and nothing more can be done, they and their loved ones will want your sympathy and guidance to feel like they aren't alone. This therapeutic relationship is your privilege, your wheelhouse, and ultimately, a significant part of where your job satisfaction comes from.
    On a very practical level, family medicine is about improving patients through incremental change, the sum of which over time leads to improved quality of life. Let's say this is a game of baseball. As a family doctor, you probably won't be the star batter hitting home runs. You will be hitting singles all day. Is it sexy? no. Is it progress? yes. Is it needed? yes.
    You are correct; FM can be a grind. Feeling under appreciated at some point is common. There are patients who will not be grateful despite your best efforts. There will be vague complaints for which you will have no clear idea what is going on. 20% of your patients will feel like 80% of your work. These and other daily challenges will all demand your care and attention. Family medicine not suitable for everyone, but like every other field of medicine, it has both its satisfying and less than satisfying aspects.
    I hope this helps.
    Good luck in your future studies.
  23. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from Edict in Career satisfaction in family medicine   
    To best answer your question, it requires a better understanding of what family medicine really is. The following is my perspective. Others may disagree, but to each their own.
    The hallmark of specialists is knowledge. The hallmark of family physicians is communication. As a family doctor, a large part of the job is providing empathy and patient education. The medicine is important, but almost secondary. Your greatest asset is the strength and trust of the therapeutic relationship you have with patients as their primary care provider. When a patient is sick, they will want to see you. After a patient consults a specialist, they will still want your opinion on the recommended course of action. When a patient is dying and nothing more can be done, they and their loved ones will want your sympathy and guidance to feel like they aren't alone. This therapeutic relationship is your privilege, your wheelhouse, and ultimately, a significant part of where your job satisfaction comes from.
    On a very practical level, family medicine is about improving patients through incremental change, the sum of which over time leads to improved quality of life. Let's say this is a game of baseball. As a family doctor, you probably won't be the star batter hitting home runs. You will be hitting singles all day. Is it sexy? no. Is it progress? yes. Is it needed? yes.
    You are correct; FM can be a grind. Feeling under appreciated at some point is common. There are patients who will not be grateful despite your best efforts. There will be vague complaints for which you will have no clear idea what is going on. 20% of your patients will feel like 80% of your work. These and other daily challenges will all demand your care and attention. Family medicine not suitable for everyone, but like every other field of medicine, it has both its satisfying and less than satisfying aspects.
    I hope this helps.
    Good luck in your future studies.
  24. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from wiseottawa in Career satisfaction in family medicine   
    To best answer your question, it requires a better understanding of what family medicine really is. The following is my perspective. Others may disagree, but to each their own.
    The hallmark of specialists is knowledge. The hallmark of family physicians is communication. As a family doctor, a large part of the job is providing empathy and patient education. The medicine is important, but almost secondary. Your greatest asset is the strength and trust of the therapeutic relationship you have with patients as their primary care provider. When a patient is sick, they will want to see you. After a patient consults a specialist, they will still want your opinion on the recommended course of action. When a patient is dying and nothing more can be done, they and their loved ones will want your sympathy and guidance to feel like they aren't alone. This therapeutic relationship is your privilege, your wheelhouse, and ultimately, a significant part of where your job satisfaction comes from.
    On a very practical level, family medicine is about improving patients through incremental change, the sum of which over time leads to improved quality of life. Let's say this is a game of baseball. As a family doctor, you probably won't be the star batter hitting home runs. You will be hitting singles all day. Is it sexy? no. Is it progress? yes. Is it needed? yes.
    You are correct; FM can be a grind. Feeling under appreciated at some point is common. There are patients who will not be grateful despite your best efforts. There will be vague complaints for which you will have no clear idea what is going on. 20% of your patients will feel like 80% of your work. These and other daily challenges will all demand your care and attention. Family medicine not suitable for everyone, but like every other field of medicine, it has both its satisfying and less than satisfying aspects.
    I hope this helps.
    Good luck in your future studies.
  25. Like
    Intrepid86 got a reaction from SquirtleMD in .   
    In situations like these, it's often hard to tell whether someone is truly apologetic because they've changed, or whether they're apologetic mainly because they suddenly realize the grave consequences it could have on their career. I'm also not certain what "years back" in this context means, because if you're a student who's in their mid-20s, then you're likely referring to things which happened within the last 7 years, which isn't exactly a remote history of ill-conceived actions.
    If you were not in medical school, would you still feel as compelled to address this? Clearly this is all hypothetical, and your motivations will have to be taken at face value, but good on you for at least trying to remedy it.
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