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Pablo

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  1. Delete, this forum appears to be inactive
  2. I can find info on which schools look at cGPA, and which look at the last 2 years, but I cannot find info on how schools handle summer courses. I'm super concerned because I just received my worst mark to date in my summer course and I'm trying to figure out if it's recoverable. My second degree is as follows: Year One (Full Courseload) - 3.97 Summer (Only 2 courses) 2.95 Projected Year Two/Final Year (Full Courseload) - 3.97 So therefore if my summer courses are counted, I would have a cGPA of 3.88 on my second degree, but if only the full course load years are counted, I would have a 3.97. I want to clarify this is for my second degree only, and does not take into consideration my first degree and how it affects my cGPA. How badly did I just screw myself over and is there a way to recover from it?
  3. NOSM has a 3.0 cutoff, average GPA this year was a 3.86, but they favour mainly Northern Ontario applicants, but welcome applicants from other rural parts of Canada.
  4. https://www.ouac.on.ca/guide/omsas-conversion-table/ Use the chart column 9 to convert your grades for each class to the GPA, then sum and average your total GPA.
  5. Any input on how second degrees splay into the GPA calculations or how to convert a Canadian GPA to the AMCAS scale. Prior research has suggested that an 80%+ at UWO and other Canadian schools converts to a 4.0. My understanding is also that returning to Canada is easier with a USMD, than an international MD in the Caribbean, Ireland or Australia. Here is a 2015 AMCAS conversion schedule I found: https://aamc-orange.global.ssl.fastly.net/production/media/filer_public/10/ab/10ab9407-7134-4477-9fc9-140d8acb35af/amcas_grade_conversion_guide.pdf
  6. That is a decision only you can make. However, myself and a lot of members of the forums have taken on a second undergrad. Mind you, my GPA was much worse than yours and even with a 4.0 in my second undergrad, my cGPA will still be lower than your current GPA. Certain schools weight your second degree, or your last 2-3 years higher than your first degree. Consider applying to schools where your stats provide to be the most favourable. Consider reviewing the second undergrad threads, such as this one. While the information is dated, it can be a good place to start:
  7. Can anybody shine any light on how different schools view online courses? For example, to graduate on time I must take online courses during the summer. I understand some schools do not count summer courses, but how is online looked at? I have read they are not an accurate reflection because you're not balancing them with the same course load, dealing with classmates, etc. However, I would like to know the specifics of each school. These are not science pre-reqs for any of the schools, just general requirements for my second degree.
  8. I posted this in the other pinned second undergrad thread, so apologies for double posting: How do schools look at shortened degree length and lack of a second transcript? For example, at my university, I can complete a second four year undergrad in two years with the prerequisites from my first degree. Will med schools consider this second undergrad, if it's only two years of fulltime study? Second, while I receive two degrees, I don't receive two transcripts. The registrar stated that you receive two transcripts with a cumulative GPA, but I could request a letter to delineate between my first and second degree. The first four year and second two year undergrad would also be separated by a year off, where I was not enrolled. I want to achieve the second degree at the same school, as it would be more cost effective for me to remain in my current city then to relocate for a second undergrad. I would consider an online degree, but I would also like to network more at my institution, and I'm not sure how med schools view online degrees.
  9. How do schools look at shortened degree length and lack of a second transcript? For example, at my university, I can complete a second four year undergrad in two years with the prerequisites from my first degree. Will med schools consider this second undergrad, if it's only two years of fulltime study? Second, while I receive two degrees, I don't receive two transcripts. The registrar stated that you receive two transcripts with a cumulative GPA, but I could request a letter to delineate between my first and second degree. The first four year and second two year undergrad would also be separated by a year off, where I was not enrolled. I want to achieve the second degree at the same school, as it would be more cost effective for me to remain in my current city then to relocate for a second undergrad. I would consider an online degree, but I would also like to network more at my institution, and I'm not sure how med schools view online degrees.
  10. After some long time set aside thinking, here is what I anticipate to be my game plan: I plan to enroll in a second undergrad. I’ll be meeting with the advisors at my school to see if this can be completed in 2-3 years, instead of four as my prior undergrad should have a lot of carry over. Do med schools that accept second undergrad degrees have a problem with this? It is technically a four year degree, and I will have complete at minimum two years of fulltime study. Potentially applying after one year of fulltime study. My plan is to continue my job until next fall, to save some money. A second undergrad is less of a financial burden than grad school. With grad school the associated costs would be much higher, including housing costs, etc. However, the job prospects with a second undergraduate aren’t as favourable as a graduate degree. I do feel I’m very passionate about medicine, and as per reading these forums this sounds like a better plan than going to grad school if my end goal is ultimately medicine. What schools am I limited to if I’m applying with a second undergrad? Last but not least, how can I maximize the time while I’m only working? I’m in a pretty fortunate position where I can network with our local healthcare providers and am in good standing with the academics at my school. I’m thinking of continuing my research from my undergraduate thesis, and assisting other laboratories at the university. Should I look into being more involved in the community as well? Please let me know your thoughts and if this is sound logic or not. I understand I may not get in on my first go, or at all. However, I would not be happy if I never applied myself to achieve what I really want. Thank you all for your time and feedback.
  11. Upon recalculating my GPA using the method suggested (including doubling six credit courses) my GPA is as follows: First year 2.87 (Failed a course) Summer Course 2 Second Year 3.44 Third Year 3.04 (Swap to sciences) Fourth Year 3.75 (Empirical thesis) Cumulative 3.23 If anybody wants to check my math on this, I will gladly send my excel spreadsheet. I'm not against going back for another one to two years to boost my GPA, but is it even savable at this point? Obviously it's more favorable and cost effective to focus on boosting my undergrad GPA than attending grad school just for the sake of increasing my chances of getting in. If I do go back for a year or two, what do I take? Do I focus on the sciences, or do I just take a plethora of easy courses to excel in? I've taken the majority of courses available for my degree in the social sciences. Do I apply to graduate with my current degree and apply for a second degree, or do I just add on an additional year of study to my current degree and take additional courses? Do I retake all courses below a certain GPA? What about work? Is my current work experience favorable to the application? Obviously if I quit now to pursue fulltime study, I would not get a letter of reference and would lose a lot of connections to my local healthcare community. How would this fair for my application if the school sees I did not apply to graduate, took a year off, and went back for a fifth or sixth year of study? If I don't quit, what do I do in the mean time? Do I take a Kaplan courses, do I take courses through a different institution online to prepare for the school workload or the MCAT this summer? Do I volunteer at the hospital or in the community on top of my work experience in healthcare? Do I volunteer to assist with research in the laboratories at the school, even though I would not be added as an author should they be published? As I mentioned, I don't necessarily need to stay in Ontario, and would not mind going out of province to apply, but I want to make the most productive and efficient use of my time. Thank you all so much for your help! This forum has already provided me with more information than I could have asked for.
  12. Yes, I took a full course load but have not yet applied to graduate. So if I were to re-take the three courses I listed, only the better of the two I took would show up on my transcript. I'd have to check with the school, but I believe since they are taken at a different time, that they would show up separately as a fifth year of study with those three courses and the previous marks would show up as a withdrawal (not part of the cumulative GPA). Is this not favorable? I've read that med schools do not consider part time studies? Would a better alternative to be re-enroll in full time studies and re-take the courses I did not perform adequately in? I would have to wait a year before I could do so, and that would be quite the gamble. Is my GPA and work experience competitive enough to apply to schools without that don't require the MCATs as I have more or less missed the cut off for the MCATs this year as I have just realized.
  13. Thanks for the reply, First year 3.0 Second year 3.3 Third year (swap from arts to science) 3.0 Fourth year 3.7 (One percent away from a 3.9) Full course load all four years, but now I would be re-taking courses as a part time student. I am in Ontario, but I have no reservations about where I apply. I'd prefer to stay within Canada, but have no preference whether I remain in Ontario or not. Ideally, I'd want to practice in Canada, and would be worried that applying in the states or abroad would function as a barrier to this. I posted my comments as a non-trad because I'm not a STEM major by any means. My undergrad was a BA Psych, but I swapped to a BSc Psych with a focus on Neuroscience. I'm not sure if that makes me qualify as a non-trad or not.
  14. Hello everyone, I’m looking for some guidance on my potential prospects for grad school or med school, and help on selecting the best route to get there. I apologize if this is a long read, but I want to provide as much information as possible to help guide the decision. Also, as a disclaimer I am a Canadian. Undergrad: I am about to complete my undergrad in the social sciences. I took the majority of my science & stats courses in my third year, performed poorly (3.0 in sciences/third year). I performed the best in my fourth year with a 3.7% and finished overall with a 3.3%. Relative work Experience: I completed a yearlong empirical thesis in a biological laboratory in my last year, no publication but my supervisor is reviewing the data. I worked as a TA for one course as an undergrad. I work fulltime with an organization that focuses on healthcare. I routinely meet with doctors, patients and community members alike. It was one of the physicians that upon hearing about my undergrad research and work experience, suggest that I reconsider applying to med school. Alternative Routes Considered: I have considered a MSc in Neuroscience, or a MPH/MSc in Epidemiology. I have a dwindling interest in this route, mainly due to my desire to work with people and research job prospects. However, this is where I conducted my thesis, and have a plethora of vocational experience related to it. I have considered the MPH/MSc in Epidemiology most recently as the job prospects seem better and similar to my current duties. They combine the areas of research I’m interested in (experimental design, statistical analysis, data collection, public promotion) without the dissections. Potential Plans: I want to apply for fall 2018 induction, which means applying by this winter. Aside from my job, I have nothing else on my itinerary. I’m willing to put everything into getting in. I failed a course in first year, it was not related to my major at all, but has decreased my cumulative GPA. I have considered retaking this course as it would increase my cumulative GPA by 1-2%. On the OMSAS scale, this is the difference between a 3.3 and 3.7 GPA. I have also considered retaking the statistics courses I performed poorly in (2.7), because I am competent with statistics, but due to how exams were weighted, I’m worried this performance will not be evident to grad schools or med schools. Unfortunately, retaking all the science courses is not an option to me, or taking a second undergrad. I have no financial support, and have only my income to depend on. Moreover, the class times compete with my work hours. This is why I had planned to retake the smallest amount of courses that would reduce the financial repercussions while having the largest return on my immediate GPA and application. Should I forgo this plan all together, or is it worth increasing my GPA by 1-3%? Will this be negatively viewed as a way to falsely increase my grades? I’ve considered instead of retaking courses, or maybe in conjunction with courses, is applying to other laboratories in the university to garnish more references and experience. Alternatively, offering my time as a volunteer with in the hospital. I’m not sure which looks better. The other option I’ve considered is pouring it all into the MCAT. Despite my marks, and after reviewing a few practice MCATs online, I think I could perform well. But, is my GPA so poor that even if I perform extraordinarily on the MCAT, I will not be as competitive? Obviously an applicant with an extraordinary GPA and extraordinary MCAT would be favoured. My other plan is grad school before med school. In which case, I’m assuming the research based MSc in Neuroscience would be better than the MPH? I would prefer to not take this route, as it would be very expensive and from researching these forums, an inefficient way of getting in. Conclusion: I need guidance. I’m extremely passionate about becoming a physician and will do anything in my power to get there. I really don’t want to, but if need be, I’m willing to consider alternative routes if I really do stand no chance. I have the next four months or so before I need to start applying to grad and med schools alike, how can I make the most of my time? Am I even a competitive grad school applicant let alone med school applicant?
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