Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Dodo

Members
  • Content Count

    64
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Dodo last won the day on March 23 2019

Dodo had the most liked content!

About Dodo

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I was rejected before getting in. The single most important thing for me was to craft a new personal narrative that was compelling, coherent and catchy. Instead of feeling like I prepared an answer for the question "Why medicine?", it felt like I convinced myself I was destined to practice medicine and I was confident that my admission would follow at some point. I became enthusiastic about sharing my story and showing my personality to the interviewers. I had to truly convince myself before I was able to convince them. The process is obviously very personal and you probably have a solid answer to the "Why medicine?" question already, but it might be worth looking at a different personal story that gets you excited.
  2. I'm about to finish a PhD and start med school, so here's my 2 cents. Time is right to say that many discoveries are found by people without PhD. But more importantly, think of how many people with a PhD will NEVER discover or invent anything that is slightly relevant not only to non-initiated people, but even within their own field of study. And this is true within science, not only in humanities. I can't help but think that there's a huge part of academia that seems so disconnected it only acts as a self-licking cone (publishing research to add papers in your resume to get more funding). Just ask any PhD student out there to talk about their dissertation, and you'll find so many people with amazingly pointless research that will still earn them a PhD. I suspect many students go on to pursue a PhD and waste years researching a topic to delay their entry into the job market. School is all they've ever known and it seems like a safe place for them, especially with widely available graduate grants and scholarships. Now please don't think that I put all PhDs in the same basket. Most are obviously amazing people. I just want to point out that there's a massive difference between having a PhD and being a university professor or researcher doing groundbreaking research.
  3. If both +1 COE docs and IM geriatricians do essentially the same job, I assume the IM geriatrician might have more opportunities in the city due to longer training? Can the IM geriatrician bill more for the same work?
  4. In your opinion, would it possible or common for someone with the +1 in Care of the Elderly to focus exclusively on elderly/residential care in Vancouver? what does the job market look like for IM geriatricians vs FM +1 in COE in the city?
  5. Héhé Miama I know who you are! Congratz!
  6. You may also find CEGEP courses offered exclusively in the weekend (these are rare I concede). I think 202-NYB was offered at Dawson College on Saturdays.
  7. Ahahaha it was a nightmare because I drove to get there, but if the bus/train schedules allow you to get to Mtl on time, I sincerely think it's worth it. You can sleep/study during the trip. CEGEP courses are so inexpensive that it's probably cheaper overall than say Athabasca
  8. I suggest you also consider looking on the other side of the river. By taking CEGEP courses in Gatineau, you are 100% guaranteed to have them approved. If you don't speak French, look for Heritage College. If you speak French, there's Cégep Outaouais and Collège Universel. The main issue is that none of these CEGEP offer night classes. You could take 203-NYA Mécanique through distance education at Cégep@Distance (in French). For some classes, I drove to Montreal after work to attend night classes at Dawson College (in English) and Collège Ahuntsic (in French), so that may be another option. Other Montreal CEGEPs probably offer night classes as well.
  9. I did CHEM 2203 at Carleton (Prof. Peter Buist is the best prof ever, you WILL enjoy Organic Chemistry!) and CHEM 217 and CHEM 218 at Athabasca. All three courses were approved by McGill.
  10. If nothing is currently available, I'd like to get in touch with med students who are interested in developing such bilateral training program.
  11. Physicians who completed their D.O. in the US and come to Canada after their residency can practice just like any M.D. (from what I understand). Even if I'll be studying allopathic medicine rather than ostheopathic medicine, I'm intrigued by the Ostheopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) taught at D.O. schools. I was wondering if it's possible to complete formal OMT training in the US as a Canadian M.D. student and obtain a US accreditation to use the techniques in Canada. Has anyone ever heard of some sort of exchange between D.O. and M.D. schools or OMT training tailored for M.D. students looking to broaden their clinical skills?
  12. Les médecins qui ont complété un DO aux USA ainsi qu'une résidence et qui viennent au Canada ont le droit de pratique, tout comme les détenteurs d'un MD. Je suis intrigué par la technique OMT qui est enseignée dans les écoles de DO. Je me demandais s'il était possible d'acquérir une formation en osthéopathie aux USA pendant les études de MD au Canada et d'obtenir une certification formelle qui permette d'utiliser légalement ces techniques au Canada. Existe-t-il un programme en osthéopathie pour les étudiants de médecine allopathique?
  13. I did CHEM 217 through Athabasca with home labs and it was accepted so I assume the same applies to PHY202
  14. My deferral request was approved today! IP waitlist should move soon
  15. I just submitted my deferral request this morning. Hopefully it will all work out and the waitlist will move up one more spot in the IP category!
×
×
  • Create New...