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LiconC

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  1. Like
    LiconC reacted to xiphoid in If you had a year off, what would YOU do?   
    Would also second what @Egg_McMuffin said - something very very un-related to medicine. If money isn't a concern, I'd travel as much as possible. If it is, then I'd get a part-time/contract job (or perhaps a few jobs) in something service-related/touristy. I worked at a really popular tourist attraction (not an amusement park) for a while before starting med, and that job honestly taught me so much about myself, about people in this world, and just about the non-medicine working world in general. As much as it was kind of awful at times during it (I lost a little bit of faith in humanity while working there and seeing the way people acted), I'm really glad I had that experience and I wouldn't give up that time in my life for med-related experiences. Once you start med, it really can be quite all-consuming and if you aren't consciously aware of it, you'll one day realize that the only people you interact with and are friends with on a daily basis are all in medicine or healthcare.
  2. Like
    LiconC reacted to hihi1234 in If you had a year off, what would YOU do?   
    I completely agree with what xiphoid and Egg_McMuffin said as well as everyone before me. I haven’t gotten into med school yet, but I was rejected post interviews last year. I took a year off to work (service/tutoring) and also spent 2 weeks to backpack on my own (in Europe).  Meanwhile, spent lots of time with fam&friends, tried many new activities (made a bucket list), read (books/finance articles/news). I really cannot stress how important it is to forget about the med process for a while and really take some time for yourself. You will look back and see how much you have grown as a person, the breadth of opportunities outside, and how vast the world is. You gain a lot of understanding of both the world and more importantly yourself. It is definitely a personal investment and you get to do something you enjoy. At the same time, these experiences are exactly what is going to get you into med, because they truly make you who you are and that’s what the adcoms want to see. Just take it easy on yourself and do whatever you’ve been wanting to do, while obv still maintaining everything you need for next cycle. 
  3. Like
    LiconC reacted to Bambi in Unique Situation   
    If you want to be a taxi driver in Canada with a medical degree, then leave.
    There are no worthwhile shortcuts. By avoiding the competitive lottery, you are selling yourself short and will end up with disappointment.  Have a Plan B in case you don’t get into medicine, work hard, stay motivated and let the chips fall where they may. Some members here have only gotten in after 5, 6 or 7;attempts. Persistence is absolutely required. 
  4. Like
    LiconC reacted to Egg_McMuffin in If you had a year off, what would YOU do?   
    If I had that option I'd pick something that helps me grow as a person and most importantly as un-related to medicine as possible. Once you get in you'll see how valuable that time away from the premed and med bubble is.
  5. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from bigboydyo in Why do people want this so bad ?   
    I think that a lot of pre-med are not able to fully appreciate that laundry list of issues with medicine, myself included. The route to becoming an MD is overwhelming, and one strategy of dealing with all of the ambiguity and complication is to just fully commit ones-self and charge straight ahead. Why are people so interested specifically in medicine? It is multifaceted--pressure from family, the desire to stand out and prove one's self, the ability to engage in a really cool career. Another aspect is that, through people's commitment, people often feel that they cannot turn back or question the direction in which they are going. Speaking for myself, probably 80% of people I know intimately know that I am aiming for an MD. I've registered thousands of hours of medicine related commitments and time spent thinking about being an MD, and thousands of dollars on MCAT prep. My identity is based around medicine at this point, so challenging that can be really uncomfortable. And on top of all of that, the uncomfortable alternative career is, well,... nothing. Like I haven't really spent any time seriously considering or planning for a plan B, namely because the process of getting into med in the first place is so consuming. All in all, I think that if medicine were easier to get into, people would think more about whether it was something that they actually thought was worth their time. I am very very convinced that the vast majority of applicants want to go into med for the wrong reasons, and it is a shame because it ruins everything, or at the very least means that people might have to take a lot longer to do what they want to do. 
  6. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from bigboydyo in Why do people want this so bad ?   
    I think that a lot of pre-med are not able to fully appreciate that laundry list of issues with medicine, myself included. The route to becoming an MD is overwhelming, and one strategy of dealing with all of the ambiguity and complication is to just fully commit ones-self and charge straight ahead. Why are people so interested specifically in medicine? It is multifaceted--pressure from family, the desire to stand out and prove one's self, the ability to engage in a really cool career. Another aspect is that, through people's commitment, people often feel that they cannot turn back or question the direction in which they are going. Speaking for myself, probably 80% of people I know intimately know that I am aiming for an MD. I've registered thousands of hours of medicine related commitments and time spent thinking about being an MD, and thousands of dollars on MCAT prep. My identity is based around medicine at this point, so challenging that can be really uncomfortable. And on top of all of that, the uncomfortable alternative career is, well,... nothing. Like I haven't really spent any time seriously considering or planning for a plan B, namely because the process of getting into med in the first place is so consuming. All in all, I think that if medicine were easier to get into, people would think more about whether it was something that they actually thought was worth their time. I am very very convinced that the vast majority of applicants want to go into med for the wrong reasons, and it is a shame because it ruins everything, or at the very least means that people might have to take a lot longer to do what they want to do. 
  7. Like
    LiconC reacted to Dr. House's Good Leg in McMaster Interview Invites/Regrets 2019   
    Time Stamp: 1:46
    Invite/Reject: Rejection
    GPA: 3.71
    CARS: 128
    Casper: Answered every question but felt like I let my concern over time affect my answers a little. Overall felt ok though.

    Geography: IP
    As a mature applicant who did some undergrad classes ten years ago before I knew I wanted to pursue medicine, I wish McMaster had a time limit on which classes count toward your GPA calculation. Oh well, thankfully most other schools are more concerned with recent academic achievements.
    I'd also like to remind younger applicants who might be feeling down right now about not getting the response they wanted that there's no such thing as running out of time with this pursuit. Try to never take rejection personally and instead let it build you into an even stronger person and applicant. Your future co-workers and patients will be grateful that you did.
    Best of luck to everyone that got good news today and to those that will continue the grind.
    Leg
  8. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from UWCC in Best and Worst thing about Alberta?   
    Edmonton is a multi-cultural city primarily made up of blue-collar people, which is fantastic (esp. compared to Toronto and Vancouver) in that people really love to small talk, etc. That being said, we have an enormous university and a lot of government here, as well. Edmonton is not a place that you would come for a vacation (although there are plenty of gems), however it is a really great place to be if you are engaged in something, like work or school. Second sunniest city in Canada. Amazing river-valley network. Not too far from the Rockies. Great restaurant scene. 
  9. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from IMislove in UofA Indigenous Student Admissions Thoughts   
    Fairness is a tricky thing to put one's finger on. I think of myself as a very fortunate, well-rounded, and capable person, and y'know what? I often find life to be really really hard. So my thoughts are that if my own very privileged journey is marked by difficulty, I cannot imagine what it would be like if you came from a background like most indigenous people in Canada. Lets be real here: If you are browsing on this forum and looking around, there is higher chance than not that you come from an educated, supportive, wealthy, family that is not definitively marked by a horrendous and injurious part of one's past  (I am not directing this statement at you, Baljinderthecrow, it is a general statement). Lets not kid ourselves--achieving the high level of functioning required to get into medical school is not entirely our own grit and perseverance--often times a huge amount of support is involved. Thus, the system entails that someone who doesn't have that support or healthy starting-point is less likely to succeed in the process. In other words, unless equitable measures are put into place, the need for Indigenous doctors will not be met. 
  10. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from IMislove in UofA Indigenous Student Admissions Thoughts   
    Fairness is a tricky thing to put one's finger on. I think of myself as a very fortunate, well-rounded, and capable person, and y'know what? I often find life to be really really hard. So my thoughts are that if my own very privileged journey is marked by difficulty, I cannot imagine what it would be like if you came from a background like most indigenous people in Canada. Lets be real here: If you are browsing on this forum and looking around, there is higher chance than not that you come from an educated, supportive, wealthy, family that is not definitively marked by a horrendous and injurious part of one's past  (I am not directing this statement at you, Baljinderthecrow, it is a general statement). Lets not kid ourselves--achieving the high level of functioning required to get into medical school is not entirely our own grit and perseverance--often times a huge amount of support is involved. Thus, the system entails that someone who doesn't have that support or healthy starting-point is less likely to succeed in the process. In other words, unless equitable measures are put into place, the need for Indigenous doctors will not be met. 
  11. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from IMislove in UofA Indigenous Student Admissions Thoughts   
    Fairness is a tricky thing to put one's finger on. I think of myself as a very fortunate, well-rounded, and capable person, and y'know what? I often find life to be really really hard. So my thoughts are that if my own very privileged journey is marked by difficulty, I cannot imagine what it would be like if you came from a background like most indigenous people in Canada. Lets be real here: If you are browsing on this forum and looking around, there is higher chance than not that you come from an educated, supportive, wealthy, family that is not definitively marked by a horrendous and injurious part of one's past  (I am not directing this statement at you, Baljinderthecrow, it is a general statement). Lets not kid ourselves--achieving the high level of functioning required to get into medical school is not entirely our own grit and perseverance--often times a huge amount of support is involved. Thus, the system entails that someone who doesn't have that support or healthy starting-point is less likely to succeed in the process. In other words, unless equitable measures are put into place, the need for Indigenous doctors will not be met. 
  12. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from UWCC in Best and Worst thing about Alberta?   
    Edmonton is a multi-cultural city primarily made up of blue-collar people, which is fantastic (esp. compared to Toronto and Vancouver) in that people really love to small talk, etc. That being said, we have an enormous university and a lot of government here, as well. Edmonton is not a place that you would come for a vacation (although there are plenty of gems), however it is a really great place to be if you are engaged in something, like work or school. Second sunniest city in Canada. Amazing river-valley network. Not too far from the Rockies. Great restaurant scene. 
  13. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from IMislove in UofA Indigenous Student Admissions Thoughts   
    Fairness is a tricky thing to put one's finger on. I think of myself as a very fortunate, well-rounded, and capable person, and y'know what? I often find life to be really really hard. So my thoughts are that if my own very privileged journey is marked by difficulty, I cannot imagine what it would be like if you came from a background like most indigenous people in Canada. Lets be real here: If you are browsing on this forum and looking around, there is higher chance than not that you come from an educated, supportive, wealthy, family that is not definitively marked by a horrendous and injurious part of one's past  (I am not directing this statement at you, Baljinderthecrow, it is a general statement). Lets not kid ourselves--achieving the high level of functioning required to get into medical school is not entirely our own grit and perseverance--often times a huge amount of support is involved. Thus, the system entails that someone who doesn't have that support or healthy starting-point is less likely to succeed in the process. In other words, unless equitable measures are put into place, the need for Indigenous doctors will not be met. 
  14. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from IMislove in UofA Indigenous Student Admissions Thoughts   
    Fairness is a tricky thing to put one's finger on. I think of myself as a very fortunate, well-rounded, and capable person, and y'know what? I often find life to be really really hard. So my thoughts are that if my own very privileged journey is marked by difficulty, I cannot imagine what it would be like if you came from a background like most indigenous people in Canada. Lets be real here: If you are browsing on this forum and looking around, there is higher chance than not that you come from an educated, supportive, wealthy, family that is not definitively marked by a horrendous and injurious part of one's past  (I am not directing this statement at you, Baljinderthecrow, it is a general statement). Lets not kid ourselves--achieving the high level of functioning required to get into medical school is not entirely our own grit and perseverance--often times a huge amount of support is involved. Thus, the system entails that someone who doesn't have that support or healthy starting-point is less likely to succeed in the process. In other words, unless equitable measures are put into place, the need for Indigenous doctors will not be met. 
  15. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from IMislove in UofA Indigenous Student Admissions Thoughts   
    Fairness is a tricky thing to put one's finger on. I think of myself as a very fortunate, well-rounded, and capable person, and y'know what? I often find life to be really really hard. So my thoughts are that if my own very privileged journey is marked by difficulty, I cannot imagine what it would be like if you came from a background like most indigenous people in Canada. Lets be real here: If you are browsing on this forum and looking around, there is higher chance than not that you come from an educated, supportive, wealthy, family that is not definitively marked by a horrendous and injurious part of one's past  (I am not directing this statement at you, Baljinderthecrow, it is a general statement). Lets not kid ourselves--achieving the high level of functioning required to get into medical school is not entirely our own grit and perseverance--often times a huge amount of support is involved. Thus, the system entails that someone who doesn't have that support or healthy starting-point is less likely to succeed in the process. In other words, unless equitable measures are put into place, the need for Indigenous doctors will not be met. 
  16. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from HappyAndHopeful in UofA Indigenous Student Admissions Thoughts   
    People get butthurt about this type of stuff, but honest to god it is the right thing. I have done some work in rural Indigenous communities and one thing that I found to be striking (but concurrently made perfect sense) was that often times Indigenous people want nothing to do with the white man (and by white man, I pretty much mean anyone non-Indigenous). Indigenous people need physicians who truly understand them, and frankly, white people are just too epistemically disadvantaged in that regard. 
  17. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from HappyAndHopeful in UofA Indigenous Student Admissions Thoughts   
    People get butthurt about this type of stuff, but honest to god it is the right thing. I have done some work in rural Indigenous communities and one thing that I found to be striking (but concurrently made perfect sense) was that often times Indigenous people want nothing to do with the white man (and by white man, I pretty much mean anyone non-Indigenous). Indigenous people need physicians who truly understand them, and frankly, white people are just too epistemically disadvantaged in that regard. 
  18. Like
    LiconC reacted to Lactic Folly in Asking the same person to submit an LoR over and over and over...   
    Not much way around if it, if this is going to be one of your strongest letters. If it helps, most of the time and effort lies in writing the initial draft. It should take much less work afterwards if all they need to do is change the date and print out a new copy in subsequent years.
  19. Like
    LiconC reacted to psychsohard in Accepted/Waitlisted/Rejected??   
    Result: Accepted!!
    Geography :IP 
    GPA: 3.51
    MCAT: 509, CARS: 129
    Degree : BSc in psychology, completed this year
    E.C: Diverse & some non-traditional. Long term volunteering, semester abroad, research project abroad, honours thesis, lots of non traditional work experience. I also used several spots in top 10 to talk about personal adversity. 
    Interview : I felt it went really well, I would even go so far to say it was enjoyable. A few of the MMI stations touched on things that I've spent a lot of time discussing in my degree so I think that worked to my advantage.
     
    This was my first application cycle and U of C was my only interview, so I am just over the moon. I've been told before that I should not even bother applying to medical school with my "low" GPA. To anyone who doesn't have a 4.0 and feels they don't have a shot - don't give up!! 
  20. Like
    LiconC reacted to yup in A Crazy CARS idea   
    If you ever consider applying to medical schools in the United States, they will consider past MCAT scores!
  21. Like
    LiconC reacted to Meridian in A Crazy CARS idea   
    You will want to apply widely in Canada to every school you can be competitive to get an interview.  Yes you need a good CARS for MAC (and other schools).  I would not restrict your school target list so quickly.  If Medicine is your focus, maybe you should reduce your work/research this summer and concentrate on MCAT ?
  22. Like
    LiconC reacted to Med Eye in A Crazy CARS idea   
    Yeh be careful, this is a risky strategy and puts all your eggs in a McMaster shaped basket!
  23. Like
    LiconC reacted to Edict in A Crazy CARS idea   
    You aren't missing anything. If I were you, I would write the CARS and do not answer a single question in any other section, just skip. This way, lets say you don't get into Mac. The next year, you can re-write focusing on all sections and apply to Canada since they don't look at past MCATs. If you apply to the states, they will look at previous MCATs, but having basically 0 in every other section makes it pretty obvious you didn't try in those sections at all. That way, they will likely disregard them if they look holistically, however you would have to watch out for schools that have some sort of formula. 
     
     
  24. Like
    LiconC reacted to Meridian in A Crazy CARS idea   
    It could work and you could achieve a Mac interview. Mac is transparent with GPA/CARS/Casper being weighted equally to get an interview.  A wildcard though is the Casper which you will never know how you actually score.  Maybe start with some CARS practice exams now and see where you benchmark.
    Only negatives (inside Canada) are you may be destined to write the MCAT twice and you are limiting where you can apply first cycle.
    Personally I would think more along the lines of how to maximize opportunity for multiple interviews and thus a better chance of a Med School acceptance somewhere. 
     
  25. Like
    LiconC reacted to bearded frog in A Crazy CARS idea   
    Do NOT do this if you will apply to the US. Yes there are “holistic” schools but with thousands of applications almost all of them will have a numerical hard cut off. Like application requirements that mean that your application will never be seen by human eyes. I would not rely on the hope that some schools will take the time to actually look to see that you did cars specifically then take that into account.
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