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LiconC

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  1. Like
    LiconC reacted to acacna in Can a high CARS alone really get you in?   
    This is U of C specifically: High CARS will help your chances of getting an interview. The rest of the MCAT isn't as stringently evaluated from my understanding - depends who looks at your application and how they consider your MCAT on their 'subjective assessment of academic merit' score.
    Once you get to the interview stage, I would argue that pre-interview scores don't make a huge difference anymore. In the past (God knows how many cycles now), I have had high application scores despite having super low CARS. I wasn't able to get in because I bombed the interview. So ya, high pre MMI scores (including CARS) cannot really compensate for a poor interview.
  2. Haha
    LiconC got a reaction from pyridoxal-phosphate in Rumours about cut-offs   
    Naw, man. 
  3. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from pyridoxal-phosphate in Rumours about cut-offs   
    I think that it is a bit of a stretch of the imagination to assume that having a parent who makes 100k a year (or even 300k a year) is buying their children luxurious cars and sending them to private school. Maybe in the US, but this is Canada. So, I don't think you can make a broad stroke in that regard as you try to support your argument that people from a higher SES have a lower capacity for empathy. I like to think that in Canada, we do a fairly good job at interacting with people unlike ourselves, compared to other nations, anyways. And I agree, you cannot teach empathy, but you can learn it through experiences. And no, having lived the same experience as a patient is not the only way to have empathy for them... thats the entire point of empathy--feeling compassion for someone different from yourself. That being said, appreciating the struggles of the Other becomes easier when you see yourself reflected in them. But again, not the only way. 
    Also, the way you are framing this complaint seems almost like you are assuming that adcomms have a favourability bias towards rich applicants. Although this is true in the sense that interviewers will be more likely to have positive feelings about an applicant more similar to them (assuming the interviewers are, themselves, of a high SES), I think that it is more so a problem with academia. Some of the big reasons academia is elitist are: applicants with financial support have less stress and are able to do better; higher SES status is attached to post-secondary education, which creates a system of parents with university education sending their children to university and also giving them the tools to succeed. And, although medicine becomes a clinical practice, medicine is ultimately a highly academic system. I just think that people sometimes attack the instances of high SES in matriculated applicants as if it is some sort of conspiracy, and I think doing so misses the point that it is more so a systemic issue. Like, it's not a bunch of good old boy doctors liking applicants who come into the interview room wearing a rolex. Rather, I think it is more akin to the idea that if your parents own a drywalling company, you are going to have a much easier time succeeding as a dry-waller. Moving into different careers may entail moving into different SES realms, none of which is easy because they all involve their own implicit skills and educations. 
  4. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from theevilsloth in Rumours about cut-offs   
    You are preaching to the choir, I agree with you about the mannerisms, small talk etc being an enormous advantage. You. Are. Right. But I think this image that you are painting of spoiled brats driving around in sports cars is utter fantasy that you are using to paint all high SES people as immoral gluttons. Sure, we all know and have seen people who are privileged to these luxuries, but it isn't really a thing. You have to be making an enormous amount of money to be doing that shit. Like, more than doctor money. Remember, a salary of 300k is like 170k after taxes. Moreover, its not really a cultural thing. I know plenty of academics in a high SES bracket who probably make $300k a year and I have literally never heard of someone buying their kid a luxury vehicle. 
  5. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from theevilsloth in Rumours about cut-offs   
    I think that it is a bit of a stretch of the imagination to assume that having a parent who makes 100k a year (or even 300k a year) is buying their children luxurious cars and sending them to private school. Maybe in the US, but this is Canada. So, I don't think you can make a broad stroke in that regard as you try to support your argument that people from a higher SES have a lower capacity for empathy. I like to think that in Canada, we do a fairly good job at interacting with people unlike ourselves, compared to other nations, anyways. And I agree, you cannot teach empathy, but you can learn it through experiences. And no, having lived the same experience as a patient is not the only way to have empathy for them... thats the entire point of empathy--feeling compassion for someone different from yourself. That being said, appreciating the struggles of the Other becomes easier when you see yourself reflected in them. But again, not the only way. 
    Also, the way you are framing this complaint seems almost like you are assuming that adcomms have a favourability bias towards rich applicants. Although this is true in the sense that interviewers will be more likely to have positive feelings about an applicant more similar to them (assuming the interviewers are, themselves, of a high SES), I think that it is more so a problem with academia. Some of the big reasons academia is elitist are: applicants with financial support have less stress and are able to do better; higher SES status is attached to post-secondary education, which creates a system of parents with university education sending their children to university and also giving them the tools to succeed. And, although medicine becomes a clinical practice, medicine is ultimately a highly academic system. I just think that people sometimes attack the instances of high SES in matriculated applicants as if it is some sort of conspiracy, and I think doing so misses the point that it is more so a systemic issue. Like, it's not a bunch of good old boy doctors liking applicants who come into the interview room wearing a rolex. Rather, I think it is more akin to the idea that if your parents own a drywalling company, you are going to have a much easier time succeeding as a dry-waller. Moving into different careers may entail moving into different SES realms, none of which is easy because they all involve their own implicit skills and educations. 
  6. Thanks
    LiconC got a reaction from pyridoxal-phosphate in Rumours about cut-offs   
    You are preaching to the choir, I agree with you about the mannerisms, small talk etc being an enormous advantage. You. Are. Right. But I think this image that you are painting of spoiled brats driving around in sports cars is utter fantasy that you are using to paint all high SES people as immoral gluttons. Sure, we all know and have seen people who are privileged to these luxuries, but it isn't really a thing. You have to be making an enormous amount of money to be doing that shit. Like, more than doctor money. Remember, a salary of 300k is like 170k after taxes. Moreover, its not really a cultural thing. I know plenty of academics in a high SES bracket who probably make $300k a year and I have literally never heard of someone buying their kid a luxury vehicle. 
  7. Like
    LiconC reacted to RiderSx in Can a high CARS alone really get you in?   
    CARS is only 10% of the interview score. Your GPA makes up 20%, and the non-academic parameters are the other 70%, so your TOP 10 can make or break your application.
    I received an interview in 2017/18 cycle with a 123 in CARS - 503 total (but scored 90th percentile in most of the attributes)
  8. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from conbrio in Rumours about cut-offs   
    You are preaching to the choir, I agree with you about the mannerisms, small talk etc being an enormous advantage. You. Are. Right. But I think this image that you are painting of spoiled brats driving around in sports cars is utter fantasy that you are using to paint all high SES people as immoral gluttons. Sure, we all know and have seen people who are privileged to these luxuries, but it isn't really a thing. You have to be making an enormous amount of money to be doing that shit. Like, more than doctor money. Remember, a salary of 300k is like 170k after taxes. Moreover, its not really a cultural thing. I know plenty of academics in a high SES bracket who probably make $300k a year and I have literally never heard of someone buying their kid a luxury vehicle. 
  9. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from conbrio in Rumours about cut-offs   
    I think that it is a bit of a stretch of the imagination to assume that having a parent who makes 100k a year (or even 300k a year) is buying their children luxurious cars and sending them to private school. Maybe in the US, but this is Canada. So, I don't think you can make a broad stroke in that regard as you try to support your argument that people from a higher SES have a lower capacity for empathy. I like to think that in Canada, we do a fairly good job at interacting with people unlike ourselves, compared to other nations, anyways. And I agree, you cannot teach empathy, but you can learn it through experiences. And no, having lived the same experience as a patient is not the only way to have empathy for them... thats the entire point of empathy--feeling compassion for someone different from yourself. That being said, appreciating the struggles of the Other becomes easier when you see yourself reflected in them. But again, not the only way. 
    Also, the way you are framing this complaint seems almost like you are assuming that adcomms have a favourability bias towards rich applicants. Although this is true in the sense that interviewers will be more likely to have positive feelings about an applicant more similar to them (assuming the interviewers are, themselves, of a high SES), I think that it is more so a problem with academia. Some of the big reasons academia is elitist are: applicants with financial support have less stress and are able to do better; higher SES status is attached to post-secondary education, which creates a system of parents with university education sending their children to university and also giving them the tools to succeed. And, although medicine becomes a clinical practice, medicine is ultimately a highly academic system. I just think that people sometimes attack the instances of high SES in matriculated applicants as if it is some sort of conspiracy, and I think doing so misses the point that it is more so a systemic issue. Like, it's not a bunch of good old boy doctors liking applicants who come into the interview room wearing a rolex. Rather, I think it is more akin to the idea that if your parents own a drywalling company, you are going to have a much easier time succeeding as a dry-waller. Moving into different careers may entail moving into different SES realms, none of which is easy because they all involve their own implicit skills and educations. 
  10. Like
    LiconC reacted to TutorGOAT in The HOLY GRAIL of Casper Preparation - A Definitive Guide to Acing Casper   
    The Holy Grail of Casper - TutorGOAT.pdf As someone who has benefited greatly from the premed 101 community in preparing for Casper (I’ve been offered interviews at Ottawa and McMaster two consecutive years in a row), I wanted to give back by sharing everything I learned from discussion with many successful applicants. 
    Before I go into the details of what I learned, I want to HAMMER HOME the most important facts when it comes to preparing for this test. Be sure to read this first part to get the most out of the holy grail doc.
    1.  You can and WILL ace the Casper if you prepare properly. I don’t care what anyone says about it being impossible to prep for this test; any standardized test can be mastered, whether it be the MCAT or this new beast. I can attest to this strongly because a friend and myself took the time to email dozens of people who got interviews based off their Casper (since they also had lower scores in other criteria like CARS and GPA, it’s safe to say their Casper scores were high) and drilled practice based on their advice. Both of us got interviews. Then, although I unfortunately didn’t pass the interview stage last year, THIS cycle myself as well as 6 other friends that I coached closely were able to secure interviews at Casper heavy schools. 
    So the TLDR; You can and SHOULD prep for CASPER since my friends who failed to get interviews last year got interviews this year with my help. 

    2.    Unfortunately, the speculation with regards to how important typing speed is is true, but not entirely. No matter how you spin it, someone who’s typing speed is above average is going to be at a slight advantage. 
    However, I can guarantee that once you meet a certain point where you can write 4-6 solid sentences for each prompt, typing speed becomes MUCH less of a determining factor as to whether an answer is high quality.  This can be done at around 60 words per minute, and once you meet that threshold, you have what it takes to pump out KILLER answers. So, the focus should not be on increasing the diminishing return of a high typing speed (although you should start early and try hard to get to 60+ wpm). The focus should instead be on making good use of words and sentence structure to be as efficient and fluid as possible.
    TLDR; You don’t need an insane typing speed, but having less than 60wpm WILL hold you back. Get to 60wpm+ then practice constructing EFFICIENT, high quality answers. 
    3.    If you don’t get proper constructive feedback while preparing for this test, you are wasting your time (at least at the beginning). I have a bunch of friends who told me they did weeks of practice only to testify that they made no improvement. Some say this is because it’s impossible to prep for the test but that’s SIMPLY not true, and having helped my friends develop their skills this year around, I have evidence against this claim. 
    The absolute key is to get excellent feedback from others and to take the time to critically evaluate every aspect of this test: How you interpret the question, your approach to answering, what ideas you should implement, how to construct efficient arguments under time constraints, where you have room for improvement, etc. Don't over think it, but you have to attack each question with the intent of giving incredible answers from every angle!
    I suggest getting together with a dedicated group of 2-4 people, partnering up to do a few practice questions and cycling through your partners to get a few opinions on how to improve each answer.
    I’m doing Casper prep and tutoring for the express reason that positive feedback and improvement in the right direction is SO hard to gauge in the beginner stages of doing this test, yet it’s the most important thing. Since even if you have the absolute perfect knowledge and strategy for tackling the test (*cough cough*, this post) but don’t implement it well in the 5-minute time constraint, you’re hopeless. Thus, implementation of skills and approaches to Casper questions is the MOST important part, and that comes through lots of practice WITH feedback to tell if you’re actually improving. 
    TLDR; Without good feedback from smart friends or tutors, you won’t know if you’re improving. Improvement is VERY hard to gauge for this test. Get friends/tutors who can work with you to make sure you’re improving and implementing the right approach.  

    So without further ado, here’s ALL the knowledge from people who did well on the test. I distilled out all the common themes and ideas over dozens of conversations with people who got interviews off of the strength of their Casper. 
    It’s a lot to take in so I’ll probably end up making a pamphlet with step by step instructions and the best tips in my opinion, since there’s so much to know it’s a little difficult to figure out where to start. I categorized all the advice as logically as I possibly could from good reading sources, mentality tips, on to how to practice/review, writing tips and so on. Note: The formulas at the end aren’t perfect and won’t fit every question. The key is to do enough practice until you start seeing similarities in your approach to scenarios and be able to know exactly what to do, even if some elements of the scenario are unfamiliar. You will find more and more that questions dealing with something like conflict management for example will seem similar and thus will have the same approach. So the formula is a good barebones starting point, but ultimately you need to do enough timed practice with feedback to develop your own optimal approaches to different Casper questions!
    *Read the document*
    Last thing: Shameless plug! PM me for one-on-one tutoring and you can’t go wrong. I promise to offer the most efficient and effective plan to get your Casper answers to have top-notch quality. I think feedback from someone who knows what they’re doing coupled with typing speed and answer practice is probably the most important set of factors in success on this test.  All the tips I've given you are nice and all, but useless if you don't actively take the time to implement them and check if they're working.
    Being 100% transparent, I want to capitalize off of all of the hours I spent talking to people who did well, compiling all their methods and ideas, as well as coaching my close friends. I can give you all the best approaches to tackling different types of questions, the best way to review, what types of questions I think you should focus on (from my experience of course) and all in all, help you maximize your chance of getting in and living the dream!
     Although, if you don’t want to do paid tutoring, following the advice in this post and going over at least a few practice tests worth of questions with some friends who know what they’re doing and will work hard to improve each other will go a long way. 
    SO, to sum it all up: Practice typing speed for 1-2 months and do practice for at least an hour a day with friends for a month, IMPLEMENTING the ideas/skills in this doc and you’ll become a master at Casper in NO time!   The key is to take all this information and drill it until it's second nature, so go out there, put in the work to become a pro at casper,  and get one step closer achieve your dream! 
     
    Sincerely,
    Tutor GOAT 
  11. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from Pakoon in Rumours about cut-offs   
    I think that it is a bit of a stretch of the imagination to assume that having a parent who makes 100k a year (or even 300k a year) is buying their children luxurious cars and sending them to private school. Maybe in the US, but this is Canada. So, I don't think you can make a broad stroke in that regard as you try to support your argument that people from a higher SES have a lower capacity for empathy. I like to think that in Canada, we do a fairly good job at interacting with people unlike ourselves, compared to other nations, anyways. And I agree, you cannot teach empathy, but you can learn it through experiences. And no, having lived the same experience as a patient is not the only way to have empathy for them... thats the entire point of empathy--feeling compassion for someone different from yourself. That being said, appreciating the struggles of the Other becomes easier when you see yourself reflected in them. But again, not the only way. 
    Also, the way you are framing this complaint seems almost like you are assuming that adcomms have a favourability bias towards rich applicants. Although this is true in the sense that interviewers will be more likely to have positive feelings about an applicant more similar to them (assuming the interviewers are, themselves, of a high SES), I think that it is more so a problem with academia. Some of the big reasons academia is elitist are: applicants with financial support have less stress and are able to do better; higher SES status is attached to post-secondary education, which creates a system of parents with university education sending their children to university and also giving them the tools to succeed. And, although medicine becomes a clinical practice, medicine is ultimately a highly academic system. I just think that people sometimes attack the instances of high SES in matriculated applicants as if it is some sort of conspiracy, and I think doing so misses the point that it is more so a systemic issue. Like, it's not a bunch of good old boy doctors liking applicants who come into the interview room wearing a rolex. Rather, I think it is more akin to the idea that if your parents own a drywalling company, you are going to have a much easier time succeeding as a dry-waller. Moving into different careers may entail moving into different SES realms, none of which is easy because they all involve their own implicit skills and educations. 
  12. Like
    LiconC reacted to bearded frog in How long do you actually need to study for CASPer?   
    uh "studying" for casper should only take a weekend or so. Its the same prep as for an MMI interview. Review the tenants of medical ethics, lots of people read Doing Right which basically covers it (try getting it from the school or local library) otherwise just have a good knowledge of the Canadian health care system and current issues. Beyond that its just practicing how to interpret a prompt in the context of ethics and being able to quickly understand and state the issues and defend an opinion on the outcome.
  13. Like
    LiconC reacted to gunneriloveottawa in Casper Guide   
    Hi All,
    Soooo now that i got into medical school I really wanted to give back to the premed 101 community and share some of my experience with other people on this forum.  I thought I would post a thread about how I prepared for my Casper test this year to answer some of your questions.  
    I started roughly 2 months in advance
    1) Read doing right... i read the whole thing and talked out-loud about the case studies in the books with friends/family
    2) I would play with typing websites (i.e. typeracer) to speed up my typing 
    3) I bought Astroff practice tests and other practice tests and did about 8 of them... In my opinion this really helped me with timing and articulating my thoughts... I reviewed the tests and my answers with friends/ med students to get their feedback on what they thought 
    4) Prepare a document answering the following questions to help brainstorm for the personal stations
    Note: These questions are random things I came up with/ got from other resources... it is a good idea to just think about significant situations in your life where you learnt/ grew in some way... below are guiding questions:
    A time you dealt with conflict  what are your strengths/ weaknesses a time you had a conflict with authority  a time you collaborated effectively  a time you lost your integrity  a time you felt awkward future goals a time you demonstrated professionalism  overcoming a difficult situation  when you were unjustly criticized  a time you took initiative  were asked to do something that conflicted with your values  a role model you have  brainstorm about how you support others in difficult times  a time you failed That is pretty much how I prepared.. I am open to answering as many questions as I can  you can PM me or comment below 
    Some useful links:
    Websites and Resources:
    Free practice test on this website:
    https://www.apetest.org/us/product/casper-sim-for-the-mind/?c=f64cca7c8fbc
     
    Casper sample questions:
    http://www.caspertest.com/casper-sample-questions/
     
    http://bemoacademicconsulting.com/casperprep
     
    http://www.caspertest.com/casper-sample-questions/
     
    Really good advice and link to practice tests:
    http://www.mockcasper.ca/casper-guide/
     
     Bioethics link:
    http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/eppp-archive/100/201/300/cdn_medical_association/cmaj/series/bioethic.htm
     
    Sample videos:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWfDgu8nIF0
    http://www.medhopeful.com/archive/mcmaster-casper-2012-4-sample-videos-and-my-thoughts/
     
  14. Thanks
    LiconC reacted to pyridoxal-phosphate in HELP: Should I re-write the MCAT? (Hard)   
    No worries,  your mentors bring up good points as well. Not to mention that the weeks leading up to offers can sometimes be kind of nerve wracking,  which could impact your studying/motivation, just something to think about. 
    I think both can be good options, you'll just have to weigh everything and make a judgement call. 
    Good luck! 
  15. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from WunderBar in McMaster Interview Invites/Regrets 2018   
    This was the post I was looking for, baby
  16. Like
    LiconC reacted to ryantsng101010 in McMaster Interview Invites/Regrets 2018   
    Time stamp: 12:20 pm 
    Invite/Reject: Invited (MD)
    GPA: 3.78 
    CARS: 128
    Casper: I felt like I did ok on it. It was weird because I somehow managed to complete all of my sentences for every response, which was something I wasn't able to do for any of my practice.
    OOP
    Graduated in 2017 
  17. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from Vivieeeeeee in Considering Med   
    So, it seems to me like you have achieved the stable job, and are now looking to infuse your life with some more meaning, such as through a greater scope of practice, the potential to own a business, and the prestige of having an MD (no shame in it--anyone on this board who denies being attracted to the prestige of an MD is a psychopath--human beings enjoy being the envy of others, for instance jewelry has existed for a bazillion years). 
    If i were to weigh the pros and cons, I would say that you need to pursue this calling towards bringing more meaning to your life. You are not satisfied with what you have now, so you should do something about that. Whether the MD is the correct way to do this is another question entirely. My answer would be: Probably not. Seems like becoming an MD is an enormous sacrifice at the best of times, and one that seems like it is only going to bring you marginal returns. Let me frame it another way: "Would you be willing to go to school, loose a million dollars, and take on an extremely stressful lifestyle, all to end up in the same medical office but now be able to write out prescriptions?" Seems like a bad deal to me. 
    Also, from what you have posted, it seems like the intrinsic enjoyment of learning about medicine is not one of your primary factors in decision making. Also fine, but if true, maybe something to be concerned about as it probably should be one of your primary factors. And if it is, then you could maybe justify going back to school based on that argumentation. 
    Here is my final two-cents: I think you should say "fuck no" to becoming an MD, and instead start your own small business. Honestly it is an incredible way to bring a lot of meaning and purpose in your life, and will probably be a ton of fun. 
     
    Best of luck. 
  18. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from 1D7 in Considering Med   
    So, it seems to me like you have achieved the stable job, and are now looking to infuse your life with some more meaning, such as through a greater scope of practice, the potential to own a business, and the prestige of having an MD (no shame in it--anyone on this board who denies being attracted to the prestige of an MD is a psychopath--human beings enjoy being the envy of others, for instance jewelry has existed for a bazillion years). 
    If i were to weigh the pros and cons, I would say that you need to pursue this calling towards bringing more meaning to your life. You are not satisfied with what you have now, so you should do something about that. Whether the MD is the correct way to do this is another question entirely. My answer would be: Probably not. Seems like becoming an MD is an enormous sacrifice at the best of times, and one that seems like it is only going to bring you marginal returns. Let me frame it another way: "Would you be willing to go to school, loose a million dollars, and take on an extremely stressful lifestyle, all to end up in the same medical office but now be able to write out prescriptions?" Seems like a bad deal to me. 
    Also, from what you have posted, it seems like the intrinsic enjoyment of learning about medicine is not one of your primary factors in decision making. Also fine, but if true, maybe something to be concerned about as it probably should be one of your primary factors. And if it is, then you could maybe justify going back to school based on that argumentation. 
    Here is my final two-cents: I think you should say "fuck no" to becoming an MD, and instead start your own small business. Honestly it is an incredible way to bring a lot of meaning and purpose in your life, and will probably be a ton of fun. 
     
    Best of luck. 
  19. Like
    LiconC reacted to momomonster112 in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    Accepted two days ago through email. Will be declining my offer for UofT med. Hopefully this frees a space for someone!
    wGPA: 3.69
    cGPA: 3.5
    MCAT: 501
  20. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from Andre in 2.7 cgpa please help   
    There is something so weird about this whole thread, and I think it is because OP is enjoying the attention. I feel like they are subtly trolling us...  like why else would OP keep this thread alive without earnestly entertaining any of the information presented. OP knows that their predicament is one that captivates a lot of attention because it is a bit ridiculous/ concerning, but instead of using the posts to help their own situation, they merrily dance around the information presented instead of appreciating its gravitas. smh.
  21. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from YesIcan55 in 2.7 cgpa please help   
    There is something so weird about this whole thread, and I think it is because OP is enjoying the attention. I feel like they are subtly trolling us...  like why else would OP keep this thread alive without earnestly entertaining any of the information presented. OP knows that their predicament is one that captivates a lot of attention because it is a bit ridiculous/ concerning, but instead of using the posts to help their own situation, they merrily dance around the information presented instead of appreciating its gravitas. smh.
  22. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from Vivieeeeeee in 2.7 cgpa please help   
    No, you don't have a good change, you have a shitty chance, just like the rest of us... arguably 10%. So think of all the brutal inconvenience it will take to get your ducks in a row, all for a measly 10% chance. 
    If this really is a job you want then get over your ego and do a second degree. Do one more term. See how it goes. If you get the grades you think you will, then keep going. The thing about a career as a physician is that you are going to be in school for years and years, thus you had better be alright with doing school that you don't want to do. All the best man. 
     
     
     
  23. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from Coldery in 2.7 cgpa please help   
    No, you don't have a good change, you have a shitty chance, just like the rest of us... arguably 10%. So think of all the brutal inconvenience it will take to get your ducks in a row, all for a measly 10% chance. 
    If this really is a job you want then get over your ego and do a second degree. Do one more term. See how it goes. If you get the grades you think you will, then keep going. The thing about a career as a physician is that you are going to be in school for years and years, thus you had better be alright with doing school that you don't want to do. All the best man. 
     
     
     
  24. Like
    LiconC got a reaction from dryorku in 2.7 cgpa please help   
    No, you don't have a good change, you have a shitty chance, just like the rest of us... arguably 10%. So think of all the brutal inconvenience it will take to get your ducks in a row, all for a measly 10% chance. 
    If this really is a job you want then get over your ego and do a second degree. Do one more term. See how it goes. If you get the grades you think you will, then keep going. The thing about a career as a physician is that you are going to be in school for years and years, thus you had better be alright with doing school that you don't want to do. All the best man. 
     
     
     
  25. Thanks
    LiconC got a reaction from rinzler in 2.7 cgpa please help   
    No, you don't have a good change, you have a shitty chance, just like the rest of us... arguably 10%. So think of all the brutal inconvenience it will take to get your ducks in a row, all for a measly 10% chance. 
    If this really is a job you want then get over your ego and do a second degree. Do one more term. See how it goes. If you get the grades you think you will, then keep going. The thing about a career as a physician is that you are going to be in school for years and years, thus you had better be alright with doing school that you don't want to do. All the best man. 
     
     
     
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