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Med Eye

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  1. Like
    Med Eye reacted to Aristotle in How Sex, Race and Socio-economic Status impacts MMI performance:   
    Sex
    Seven papers investigated the effect of sex on MMI score. Four papers examined medical school admissions; two, nursing school admissions; and one, pharmacy admissions. Two papers identified a significant impact of sex on MMI score, while the other four did not.
    Leduc et al (2017) found that female students performed significantly better in MMI’s for three French-Canadian medical schools than their male counterparts, but only in the subgroup that spoke French at home (p=0.003). This implies a previously unexplored interaction between sex and language, which warrants further study.
    Ross et al (2017) examined the MMI scores of 526 medical applicants at the University of Calgary. It found that female students achieved a higher score than their male counterparts (p<0.001), even when they controlled for confounding variables (e.g. MCAT score, applicant age etc). Two interpretations for this difference are proposed. Firstly, that female applicants are more likely to possess the attributes of interest in the MMI assessment (communication skills, critical thinking, ethical decision making etc) which, if true, this would support the validity of the MMI process. The other is that the interviewers are victims of confirmation bias, in that they expect female applicants to possess these skills, and therefore mark them more highly. The authors of this study recommend a longitudinal, health outcome based approach to investigate this further. None of the other studies included in this analysis showed any significant effect of sex on MMI scores (Traynor et al. 2017; Kim et al. 2017; Pau et al. 2013; Gale et al. 2016; Cox et al. 2015).
    Race
    Four studies investigated the impact of race on MMI scores; three on medical school applications, and one on pharmacy (Leduc et al. 2017; Pau et al. 2016; Cox et al. 2015; Jerant et al. 2015). One of these studies reported a significant impact. Leduc et al (Leduc et al. 2017) found that applicants who self-declared as “Chinese” or “Southeast Asian” performed significantly worse than all other ethnic groups (p=0.013, 0.003 respectively). It also found that applicants who identified as “White/Caucasian” performed significantly better than other ethnic groups (p=0.012). In a qualitative investigation of the potential reasons behind this, it was reported that many of the interviewers had come across a stereotype that Asian students are “shy”, and that this may have impacted on the scores given through a confirmation bias. The other three papers reported no significant impact.
    Socio-economic Status
    Three papers analysed the impact of socio-economic background (SEB) on MMI scores (Leduc et al. 2017; Taylor et al. 2015; Jerant et al. 2015).
    Leduc et al. used a self-assessment form to categorise applicants into those with a family income of either <$100,000, $100,000 to $250,000, or >$250,000, and compared the MMI scores for applicants within these categories. It found that students who declared a parental income of >C$250,000 had significantly higher MMI scores (M=252.8) than those in the C$100,000 to C$250,000 (M=243.3, p=0.035) and <C$100,000 (M=237.1, p<0.001) groups. This study is limited by the fact that it relies on the applicants’ self-assessment of family income, but nonetheless draws into question the validity of the process.
    Jerant et al. (Jerant et al. 2015) examined eight different factors, including parents’ education level, whether the applicant had contributed to family income, and whether the applicant was in receipt of income support, to create a composite score for SEB. This was applied to 1,420 MMI interviewees at the University of California. They found that candidates from a more deprived background had a significantly lower MMI score (p=0.03), but that this was only a small a small impact of less than 0.2 S.D. However, being from a more disadvantaged background was associated with a greater probability of being accepted onto the course (OR 3.28, p>0.001), since the final decision was made on a wide range of factors beyond MMI score, including personal statements and MCAT scores. This shows that biases within the MMI system can be compensated for by the admissions process as a whole.
    Taylor et al. (Taylor et al. 2015) found no significant relationship between the MMI score achieved by an applicant and the status of the applicant’s school (selective/fee paying vs non-selective and non-fee paying). Nor was there a relationship between MMI score and Higher Education participation rates in the area in which the applicant lived.
     
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    Also: "some universities may have financial conflicts of interest because both CASPer and MMI have now turned into revenue generating corporations for their creators and possibly their affiliated universities"
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    I believe that there should be a discussion about the inherent biases of MMI and Casper!
     
  2. Like
    Med Eye got a reaction from Anon_9 in McMaster MD Chances?   
    Yeh with a really CASPer you should have a good  chance :-)
  3. Like
    Med Eye reacted to rmorelan in This Is Insane   
    There certainly are limits that logically you should apply to various categories - ha very likely in the order you have mentioned. Of course you always are going to get some random person that is just obsessed with something in particular - either through sheer skill or effort or both. Exceptions don't make the rule here though - you don't have to be super human to get into medical school - better to know the rules cold, work hard to achieve good rating in all the categories and not to go over board in one at the expense of the other. 
  4. Like
    Med Eye reacted to chiynadoll in Coming to the end of 2nd year and no ECs?   
    It's never really too late to start, as much as it's never too early. It's important to have long term ECs as much as it is to have meaningful (to you) ECs that you enjoy doing. Starting late does mean that it can take more work to get activities set up/organized and change up your schedule to fit them in but honestly, the average number of cycles it takes an applicant to get in is 3. Meaning on average, people get in a year or two after they finish their undergrad (not straight out of third-fourth year). Just keep that in mind, and not have too hard expectations on yourself (or blame it on starting ECs "too late")
  5. Like
    Med Eye got a reaction from frenchpress in ..   
    Normal but just be careful not ignore the development of your social anxieties as these can really grow fast into unmanageable levels. There's a lot of great resources out there which can help with this . Best of luck to you! :-)
  6. Like
    Med Eye got a reaction from bearpuppy in Chances at American Medical School?   
    Just make sure you get your primary application documents in as soon as possible, just to give yourself a decent chance!
  7. Like
    Med Eye got a reaction from bearpuppy in Would an upward GPA trend make it worth applying to higher-end MD schools?   
    Make sure you get your primary application in early as it is hard enough as a Canadian, later application can be a real death knell.
     
  8. Thanks
    Med Eye got a reaction from Persephone in Question about May 8th and Subsequent Waitlist Movement   
    D
    For sure that is the case.
  9. Like
    Med Eye got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Venting about GPA conversion   
    Well said.
  10. Like
    Med Eye reacted to Lactic Folly in U of T vs. MacMed   
    I just wanted to say that I appreciate the frankness of the above post, given that the author identifies as a Mac graduate. Seems that most if not all of the important factors have been covered in this thread.
  11. Like
    Med Eye reacted to Butterfly_ in Venting about GPA conversion   
    I doubt a 0.01 point drop will make any impact on your future aspirations. Don’t be so hard on yourself.
    3.96 is a stellar GPA.
    Go reward yourself and have some fun 
  12. Like
    Med Eye reacted to bearded frog in Commuting vs living near campus?   
    Holy fuck do not commute 2.5 hours a day. That's literally 5 months of commuting over your 4 years of medical school. Your amount of debt will not be that high at all, especially as you will be paying about 1/4 the overall tuition vs elsewhere in the country. Get a line of credit, get an apartment as close to campus/hospitals as possible, use that extra 2.5 hours a day to either study and do better in medical school or relax and not hate medical school.
    Also it is super dangerous to drive more than an hour post-call with little sleep...
  13. Like
    Med Eye got a reaction from BalkanRelations in Would an upward GPA trend make it worth applying to higher-end MD schools?   
    Make sure you get your primary application in early as it is hard enough as a Canadian, later application can be a real death knell.
     
  14. Like
    Med Eye reacted to sna in Official May 8 Countdown Thread   
    Hello friends, I thought I'd drop by and share a few tips I've learned from going through this process last year
    - memes = the life support that will get you through
    - Literally anything can happen. I have classmates who cried after their interview because they thought they blew it, and they got in. I have classmates who have tried for 4-5 cycles, and they got in. One classmate had his fly open the entire time, and he got in. How you think you did on your interview(s) is a horrible predictor of what goes down on D day, anything can happen!
    - May 8th may not necessarily be the last day of waiting for you, a huge chunk (1/3 - 1/2 depending on the school) of people get accepted from the waitlist. That means that you could possibly be doing a little more waiting, so don't put your life on hold until May 8th. Work, spend time with friends, travel, hobbies.. just, if you're thinking of sitting in your room, shades drawn, in beard-growing isolation playing video games and watching Netflix until May 8th, from personal experience, I wouldn't recommend.
     
    - If things go south on May 8th and you hear bad news, please don't be too hard on yourself. You've reached the farthest point in the admissions process. I know it sucks, I know what it's like to not know what your future holds while your friends and seemingly everyone around you is celebrating their acceptances and making fb posts with 500 likes. It's incredibly frustrating and it's okay to be upset. Take a few days off, read some of the success stories in the non-trad forum (some of those are very inspiring), remember why you started, and start planning how you're going to improve your application. It's normal to take a few tries.
    Good luck to all of you  Only 11 days left until you hear back!
  15. Haha
    Med Eye got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Official May 8 Countdown Thread   
    11 days 10 hrs 57 mins - see getting better!?!?!?
  16. Haha
    Med Eye got a reaction from Butterfly_ in Official May 8 Countdown Thread   
    Might need to start taking baths!
  17. Like
    Med Eye got a reaction from Crash Bandit in Music For Studying?   
    Love Max Richter!
  18. Like
    Med Eye got a reaction from LiconC in A Crazy CARS idea   
    Yeh be careful, this is a risky strategy and puts all your eggs in a McMaster shaped basket!
  19. Like
    Med Eye reacted to Pippa756 in Music For Studying?   
    Lot of great playlists on YouTube and Spotify. Personally, find Max Richter mixes pretty good for atmosphere while studying or trying to concentrate :-)
     
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