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bigboydyo

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bigboydyo last won the day on November 13 2018

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About bigboydyo

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  1. bigboydyo

    McMaster vs U of A??

    Obviously the biggest differentiator is the 4 yr vs 3 yr program -- consider the implications of this. You will graduate a year earlier from McMaster, and this will require a more intense 3 years of Med School with minimal summer breaks. Having 4 yrs allows you to use the longer summers to carry out research or relax, among other activities. On the flip side, saving a year means a year less of schooling = a year extra of work and income. Of course, there is also an argument to be made that doing a 4 yrs programs gives you more time to adequately prepare for matching to a residency of your choice, and this extra preparation time may be key if you wish to enter a competitive residency. But McMaster does bolster a solid match rate, so it's definitely a good choice regardless. Other people can chime in on the experience of living far from home vs staying IP, which is also another major factor to consider in your case.
  2. bigboydyo

    May 14 Countdown

    We're in the endgame now...
  3. bigboydyo

    Accent mem

    la plupart de tes intervieweurs risquent d'avoir un accent QC aussi, tkt
  4. convoqué à l'Udèm. GPA 3.82 sur 4.00 à McGill en pharmaco (75 crédits)
  5. They may have cut you off to help redirect your answer; for instance, if you were to go off on what they may perceive as a tangent (i.e. unrelated to whatever they are trying to evaluate you for), they may interrupt you to help you save time and redirect your answer towards something more fruitful. However, I do sympathize with you. Being interrupted can definitely be off-putting
  6. bigboydyo

    2019 CaRMS unfilled spots

    I don't think going to an international school would make someone more competitive. Let me reiterate the issue this way: Healthcare budget + physician body's interest in maintaining physician income and responsibilities limit total amount of physicians that can be produced ==> limited residency spots As you suggest, qualified people (anyone with some form of MD) should be able to freely compete for these spots. However, given the amount of time, $ (debt) and commitment it takes to even get to that point, there is serious damage when people go unmatched. Given the high amount of ppl wanting to become doctors when compared to the number of spots available, you are likely to have 10,000 MDs compete for 1,000 spots, which guarantees at least 9,000 people will be stuck in a rut after taking on all of this debt + schooling. (these are rough numbers but I believe they are fairly representative) The way the current system circumvents this is by shifting the bottleneck of 10,000 to 1,000 in the form of admission to Canadian MD schools, where if you fail to get into it, the setback isn't too significant -- at worst, <$5k loss in terms of Med App prep, and an undergrad degree that can help you get into another field. Once you pass this barrier and get into CAN med, you are "guaranteed" a residency spot due to Carms favoring you and therefore allowing you not worry too much about then taking on the debt and years of commitment needed to get your MD. Of course, I agree with you that its not perfectly competitive at the level of residency, but I hope that you can at least understand the reasoning behind it being the case
  7. bigboydyo

    2019 CaRMS unfilled spots

    I understand your intention but I don't think you have considered the long term implications of moving towards that system. As it stands right now, the supply for people wanting to be Doctors >>>>> demand (in terms of positions available), so there has to be a bottleneck somewhere to triage the entry. Currently, the bottleneck chosen is basically entry into Canadian Med School (which then allows you to get priority in Carms). If they remove this, then anyone with the money or willingness to accumulate will just go to the cash-grab INTL schools due to their easy entry and availability of spots, and you will end up with 10,000+ candidates with massive debt fighting for around 1,000 residency spots every year. The merit-based system exists. It's your entry to Canadian schools. By choosing to study elsewhere and then reapply, you're just adding to the supply > demand (residency spots) surplus. Opening up the spots to everyone else equally is a one-way ticket to messing up the profession as a whole.
  8. Result: Invite Time Stamp: 9:20 am Interview Date: NA wGPA/cGPA: 3.80 Year: Last year UG (3rd) MCAT: 129/129/130/131 (519) ECs: Sports, research (no pubs, but 1 presentation), clinical volunteering + some other unique and interesting commitments Geography: OOP
  9. It's not necessary at all. Would suggest you to do it for YOUR sake to see if you would like to do that kind of work in your future, but for the sake of your CV, it's definitely not expected.
  10. Time Stamp: 1:08 pm Invite/Reject: Invite GPA: 3.80 CARS: 129 Casper: Assuming it was really good cause my GPA is below avg, my CARS is avg, and I'm OOP Geography: OOP Damn yo... thought for sure this was a reach for me. Pretty happy.
  11. LOL what? I hope you're joking. I personally would never pay for application-help related services but there is an actual demand for this type of stuff. People pay for MCAT prep courses, interview prep, tutoring, etc. because they feel like it will help them. Unless if the event/company that OP is promoting is known for being a scam, I don't see how anything he/she is doing is wrong. There is no apparent attempt of deceiving people whatsoever in their post. This whole subsection of the forums is dedicated for people trying to sell/seek such services, so they are clearly welcome to promote their services here.
  12. CARS is most important (because some schools only look at CARS or preferentially look at it by requiring a steeper cutoff). Psych is potentially the least important (Western school doesn't look at your Psych score). Bio and PhysChem are both equally important across all schools (except for the CARS only schools like McMaster). Long story short: CARS > PhysChem = Bio > PsycSocial Keep in mind that this is just an inference based on the cutoffs/restrictions set by schools, and some schools just look at your entire MCAT score and don't care for the breakdown by section.
  13. bigboydyo

    Interview Invites date?

    Do yourself a favor and don't look at your inbox before you're done your test.
  14. bigboydyo

    What Am I doing Wrong?

    If the inability to accomplish something is your fear, then honestly I believe that a person like that you that managed to enter a competitive UG degree, and have taught yourself tough subjects like biology (based on your previous posts) despite all the adversity you faced, is more than capable of handling different types of jobs and accomplishing meaningful things. Feeling inadequate for entry to medicine (which is only temporary; a lot of people start applying to Med School after many years of work/graduate studies, at a point which they are well prepared to enter medical school) doesn't mean that you should feel inadequate for other endeavors! In any case, I echo what Aconitase says and suggest seeking professional help. But if that is beyond your plans, at the very least, feel free to PM me for a more personal talk. I can relate quite a bit to your background and sources of stress (I come from a culture that has similar type of thinking and expectations, a fact which was led to a few members of my extended family to feel extremely insecure and inadequate with their sense of accomplishment), and would be happy to discuss with you on that matter, or just about anything else that you may want to talk about!
  15. bigboydyo

    What Am I doing Wrong?

    True, I felt the same way reading that post. To the OP, as Aconitase mentioned, the entry rate to medicine is extremely low in Canada -- below 10%. 90% of ppl trying to get in will not get in, simply put. To add insult to injury, one of the ironic yet cruel truths about the reality of getting entry to medicine is that those who can internalize this low success rate and are consequently prepared to have alternative career paths as well as a general appreciation of their life outside of their admission to medical school end up getting admission over those who have a "all-or-nothing" relationship with medical admission, because the latter may end up developing certain undersirable qualities in the process (showing signs of desperation, feeling stressed about the uncertainty of your future which can heavily impact your performance). I don't wish to deter you from pursuing Medicine, and so my heartfelt advice would be 1) find things that you enjoy other than medicine, so that you can at least come to terms with the idea that getting into medicine shouldn't be your only source of happiness in your life; one can choose a career that may be "less desirable" for them simply to be enabled to pursue other things that you enjoy in life (ex.: doing a job that you are good at, but that may not be your dream job, simply to fund your lifestyle and allow you to pursue your other goals such as enjoying hobbies and growing a family) 2) Continue building your profile/UG for med school but understand that medical schools have a duty to choose people that are mentally strong and can handle adversity and stress among other qualities that, based on your posts, I have the impression you may be lacking. The stress level and rates of burnout/suicide in physicians is high, and so they have a strong interest in looking for those aforementioned qualities. Therefore, if you seriously want to get into Medicine, it would help to build that profile. I don't mean to say that to attack your character or hurt your self-esteem, I just want to give you an honest insight on an impression I had as I believe it would be crucial for you to be aware and think about it. Disclaimer: I'm a current applicant, so apologies if any of my advice/facts seem inadequate or inaccurate.
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