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kingmaker

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  1. Don't quote me on this, but I have a friend who is currently in the program and he told that the program will grow next year, which ultimately means that the admission will grow.
  2. kingmaker

    Doctor, dentist, or pharmacist?

    Search it up, lol. In Canada, they are all competitive. For all three though, the first year courses are generally the same, so finish first year and you might learn a thing or two about your future career path. Also peep this: https://michener.ca/academic-programs/requiring-university-degree/
  3. kingmaker

    Low First Yr GPA,

    I'm in high school rn, so I don't much experience, but from what I've learned from this site is that a lot of people tend to struggle transitioning from secondary to post-secondary education. With that being said, like other people in this thread have stated some med school don't use your cumulative GPA for acceptance and most just tend to look at your best years. The main thing is don't lose your motivated and keep grinding. Moreover, don't forget that if you are financially stable enough and don't mind studying in the US, as a last resort type of plan, you can probably get into a med school in the US with a Western GPA. AMCAS translates a 80% or higher from Western to a 4.0 .
  4. I have looked around a multitude of forums and I would just like to say that your comment is more sound and harbours more information than entire threads filled with 100s of comments do. So thanks for that. And moreover, if you don’t mind, can I ask you a few questions? If you don’t reply or answer, DW, I won’t take it personally. 1. Where did you do your UG degree? I see that you’ve changed your major quite a bit, but at what university did you complete your degree? 2. Do you mind listing your ECs and volunteer experiences? Also are the ones I do in high school right now, weighed the same as the ones I do in university? 3. What was your cGPA? 4. Did you shadow any doctor in university? How significant is doing so? 5. What is one piece of advice that you would give a high school student who is transitioning to university life? What should they do/know before starting school in September, in terms of preparing to learn? 6. Most people I see on forums go to U of T, Mac or Western. I was just wondering how people at medical school actually went to Ryerson or York? Is it high or low? 7. If I get into Western’s Med Sci and York’s Kinesiology (let’s just say theoretically), which one would you recommend? They are arguably polar opposites. However, apparently Med Sci is similar to Mac’s Health Sci, so I don’t lnow. My cousin is currently doing his last year of residency as a physiatrist. After seeing his dedication to his work as well as seeing him work hard in an attempt to help people, to me, is just inspiring and selfless. Sorry if I asked too many questions and made it sound too much like a job interview.
  5. Same. I feel more motivated when I have a smart friend in my class, who thinks they can get a higher mark than me. Personally, I’m a person who thrives off competition. However, all my high school friends are sadly planning to venture out into business or law. IMO, though, I think that there is a fine line between a program being hard and competitive (like Mac Life Sci) and a program being hard for the sole purpose of just being hard and prestigious (like UofT Life Sci). ^ don’t know if u actually understand what I mean.
  6. I’m in Toronto. Not too sure about a UG degree in BC. Too much work, risk and personal sacrifices involved. In my circumstance, don’t think it’s worth it.
  7. Lol. Personally, I also find the social sciences to be extremely easy, as I do well at analyzing text and elaborating on ideas that I’m trying to convey. Writing also comes natural to me (not trying brag at all). This year, I’m taking Ancient Civilizations as well as Econ at a Grade 11 Uni level and am finding them super easy and don’t even consider them real courses that I need to study for. The problem, however, occurs in the subjectivity of the teacher. In English, which is an art (similar to social science imo), I would consider myself a relatively strong student. I’ve been getting high 80s - mid 90s. Last year though, I had a teacher who was an extremely hard marker. She also openly shows favouritism towards certain students and their marks reflect that. I finished the course with a 73. After that experience, I’m somewhat sceptical of taking social science or English courses due the heavy influence that the teacher’s opinions and values hold . Imo, it’s not worth the risk. I would rather stick to courses that I know I could get a high 90 in if I put in a sufficient amount of effort, rather than courses where I have to repeatedly adjust and manipulate my work and overall style to get a good mark.
  8. Mac is known for bringing averages down? Never heard about that, looks like something I need to look into. Life Science at Mac was my first choice prior to my discovery of the program.
  9. Hi there, So I am currently a high school student in Grade 11, and am considering to go into the medical stream. My first semester grade 11 marks, in my opinion, are good, but are not necessarily that stellar (currently averaging at 89). During second semester, I'm doing better with an anticipated average of around 93 (mostly business courses, hardest course is functions). Considering the fact that medical school heavily weigh GPA as well as MCAT, I was just wondering if this program is a "GPA killer"? From what I know, in this program, the college courses taken at Centennial College count as university credits and are presumably easy and high-school like in nature. As a result, I assume these are an easy way to bring up your GPA. However, the UofT courses (the mandatory life science ones) are considered hard and are specifically calibrated to bring the averages down if too high (bell curve). Is that true? One of the main factors that contribute to this program to be first on my list of choices is the fact that in addition to getting a degree, you also get a useful diploma which enables you to get a highly demanded job, as a paramedic. Other programs that I am considering are either a bio program at either Ryerson or Brock (to simply get a higher GPA) as well as Life Science at McMaster. With these programs, however, the potential possibility of not making it into medical school can be devastating. However, if the correct courses are taken, there is a chance to venture my way into dentistry or podiatry. Ultimately, what do you think would be the best course of action for me?
  10. Hi there, So I am currently a high school student in Grade 11, and am considering to go into the medical stream. My first semester grade 11 marks, in my opinion, are good, but are not necessarily that stellar (currently averaging at 89). During second semester, I'm doing better with an anticipated average of around 93 (mostly business courses, hardest course is functions). Considering the fact that medical school heavily weigh GPA as well as MCAT, I was just wondering if this program is a "GPA killer"? From what I know, in this program, the college courses taken at Centennial College count as university credits and are presumably easy and high-school like in nature. As a result, I assume these are an easy way to bring up your GPA. However, the UofT courses (the mandatory life science ones) are considered hard and are specifically calibrated to bring the averages down if too high (bell curve). Is that true? One of the main factors that contribute to this program to be first on my list of choices is the fact that in addition to getting a degree, you also get a useful diploma which enables you to get a highly demanded job, as a paramedic. Other programs that I am considering are either a bio program at either Ryerson or Brock (to simply get a higher GPA) as well as Life Science at McMaster. With these programs, however, the potential possibility of not making it into medical school can be devastating. However, if the correct courses are taken, there is a chance to venture my way into dentistry or podiatry. Ultimately, what do you think would be the best course of action for me?
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