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xiphoid

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xiphoid last won the day on April 25

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  1. Unfortunate you guys are only offering the Gold Visa, and not the Visa Infinite cards that RBC, Scotiabank and TD offer, but I guess it's at least better than your former medical LOC. For those wondering, the difference between the Gold Visa and the Visa Infinite at CIBC is that the Gold Visa doesn't include Trip Cancellation and Trip Interruption Insurance, while the Visa Infinite does. It's a pretty beneficial insurance to have with your credit card. I'd be pretty forgiving if these were run of the mill or cashback credit cards, but given that the CIBC Aventura Gold Visa Card is positioned as a travel rewards card, I'm less inclined to ignore this.
  2. I would definitely agree that service really varies depending on branch and rep you deal with, regardless of which bank. My LOC is with Scotia and I've had a pretty positive experience with them. Banked with RBC for years before (and still have an account with them because my oldest credit card is with them so I don't want to lose the bulk of my credit history), and had both positive and negative experiences depending on which branch I visited. I personally wouldn't use this as a deciding factor in choosing which bank to sign with, especially since you can switch later on if you're having a really negative experience.
  3. To clarify, they take the higher of the two calculated GPAs. The lower GPA is dropped and won't negatively affect your application.
  4. They should all be free. If not, then honestly, might be worth switching to a different advisor because yours doesn't seem to know what they're talking about.
  5. I got the Amex bonus points last year, as did everyone else I know who spent the $1,000 in 3 months. We were told that we wouldn't get it, but we all did. This to me sounds like your account was not set up properly. I keep all my money in savings/LOC. If I am about to write a cheque, I transfer that amount to my chequing account. I've had a bank account since I was 13, and I have never used overdraft in my life. It really isn't that hard... think of cheques like cash - make sure you have the cash before you pay. I really only use cheques to pay my rent and utilities each month, so it's not like it's a huge hassle to log into my account twice a month to transfer the money.
  6. Are you sure your account was set up correctly? The fact that it was accruing interest at prime makes me question if your advisor perhaps did the set-up wrong. From what I understand, the Scotiabank/RBC overdraft protection should waive the $5 fee as long as you are not more than $5,000/$1,000 over, making it interest only on the overdrawn amount. Not completely sure because I've never used it in my life and I don't ever intend to, but I'd just double check your account is set up properly.
  7. And yet you guys don't even offer any premium credit cards, free overdraft protection, etc. Nothing. Nada. Zilch.
  8. Very few USMDs are matching through CaRMS. Making this change would not have an impact overall on the unmatched CMG situation. Last year, only 37 USMDs participated in CaRMS, 22 of whom matched. For context, 1725 IMGs participated, taking 391 residency spots. 103 CMGs were unmatched. On the flip side, 30 CMGs applied for NRMP, 13 of whom matched. https://www.carms.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/2019_r1_tbl1e.pdf
  9. Je sais qu'il y a plusieurs écoles en ontario qui comptent les notes dans les programmes professionnels comme le PharmD, JD, DDS, etc. McMaster et Queen's par exemple. Ils ne sont pas considérés comme un doctorat, mais plutôt des programmes de premier cycle comme t'a mentionné.
  10. This sounds so similar to Queen's year 1 curriculum, it's shocking. Plus Queen's and Ottawa being the two schools with mandatory community week at the end of first year through ROMP and ERMEP... I find it kind of funny, because I know Western's preclerkship curriculum is almost entirely different from Queen's.
  11. @canadianguy7 We were all pretty convinced it was going to be green last year because of the exact same thing and then they pulled out a red backpack. So.
  12. Consider how you'd feel with the above change because that is the reality of the situation. Ultimately, if you can see yourself staying in Belgium/EU forever, then you can consider this. But if you at all want to have a chance at working in Canada one day, this is not the way to go especially since you have gotten an interview here already.
  13. I'm from a culture where it's pretty normal for three generations of a family to all live under the same roof. Sure, there are those who live at home and are still able to develop the skills they need to be independent when they move out, but it becomes much harder to do so. First year or two of undergrad, there's no shame in asking friends and those you live with how to do laundry, how to operate a dishwasher/clean dishes, sweep, mop and vacuum because most people are going through the same learning curve. It becomes a lot harder to ask these questions when you're already finished undergrad and are in grad/professional school where the expectation is that you know how to function as an adult on your own. For many, if the opportunity presents itself, they will choose to keep living at home because that is what is most comfortable. The ability to take the step and move out becomes a lot harder if you don't move out for undergrad when most of your peers are making the transition. The result ends up being some medical students/graduates living at home well into their late 20s and early 30s. Living close to home also does not necessarily mean at home. Someone who is from Toronto going to school in Waterloo for example, likely isn't going to commute to school daily (although I'm sure there are some students who think about it or have done it), but would be living away from their parents and still close enough that they can come home for the weekend if they feel homesick. I think it is extremely important to move out for undergrad, unless the cost of rent is absolutely prohibitive. This isn't coming from someone who had parents fund their education and didn't have to think about the costs of living - I worked at least 3 jobs at any given point throughout my undergrad to be able to afford to live away from home, and I am so thankful I did now that I am in medical school and realizing that some of my peers have no clue how to survive on the day-to-day without their parents.
  14. Honestly unbelievable how many medical students are awful at functioning as adults. I know some who are still living at home for medical school, and are hoping to match to their home institution for residency so that they can continue living at home. At a certain point, I think you just need to bite the bullet and move out. Yes, it means spending money on rent, but it also makes you so much more independent. You can't live with your parents forever, and they also won't be able to do your laundry, cleaning and cooking forever. At some point, you just need to grow up. Rant over, thanks for listening.
  15. No. The MD/MSc program at Queen's is the same admissions process as MD/PhD, and accepted students spend the first year working on the Masters, not the MD. If you want to do a Masters before graduating from med school though, you can apply separately for the grad program, and if you are admitted, you can request to take a year or two off from MD to finish your Masters and then come back. People who do this most often choose to take their time off after second year and then come back to start clerkship after they're finished their grad degree. I would talk with Dr. Sanfilippo if you're considering it. Downside to this is that you don't get the same funding/stipend that those who are admitted through the MD/MSc/PhD stream do.
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