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FutureOT2020

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  1. RBC has great options for OT students. The max is $65 000 with prime+2% interest and a 6/12 month grace period (sorry, i forget the exact detail). I got approved with them with no co-signer over the phone and met with them in person the next day to get access to it!!
  2. Hey! I definitely did a lot of research for my essay answers. I did a lit review to look for common themes and even used resources as a basis for what I was saying. For my personal statement, i made it more personal and based off of my experiences while still relating it to things I'm passionate about in the OT field and skills that are important in the OT field! I found it helpful for my argument to be as short and clear as possible because there isn't much space (as opposed to trying to fit a whole lot of ideas in without discussing them throughly enough). As for structure, I wrote them them like mini formal essays (thesis, support, etc). Good luck
  3. This is what I was told! And then to follow the specific instructions for that school, like how they want you to get them your acceptance (just ORPAS or a letter for UofT) and your deposit. I also requested my final transcript on ORPAS. The only thing that has to be done by the deadline is accepting on ORPAS though, and I was told firm accept means I successfully accepted!
  4. Hey! So I know this post is a year old now, but I am in the same boat right now. I am mostly debating between U of T and McMaster. I love McMasters learning style, but love U of T's curriculum. I find the U of T curriculum very specific about what you are going to be learning/to have a lot of variety in topics (i.e. students will learn about x, y, and z and will be able to x, y, and z) while I find McMasters curriculum rather vague/topics seem repetitive (there seems to be a lot of repetition in what they're saying students will learn from course to course with the exception of "advanced" being added to the title) I was wondering if you could let me know whether each course topic really is vague and the student totally decides what they want to learn on their own or whether each course has multiple/varied learning objectives and it's just the students choice on how to get there. Also, do you have any knowledge about if the curriculum is as diverse/varied as U of Ts? Lastly, I've read a lot about the program and about SDL and PBL but am having a hard time getting a picture of whether there are a good amount of lectures with the full cohort. Thanks in advance for any info! And if youre graduating right now, congratulations!
  5. Hi, sure! My cumulative GPA is 3.93 and my sub GPA is 4.0. I was in Disability Studies and Psychology in undergrad, so I feel that I had a lot of relevant course work/experiences. Some of my relevant work and volunteer experiences are being a support provider with family respite with kids with various disabilities (work with the kids at home, bring them out to community events, created vision boards with goals/dreams for the older ones), working at a child minding center, being a placement student at a school for children with Autism (was involved with therapy, an acceptance campaign, increasing child and family inclusion in areas they deemed important like the campaign/other activities), and being a volunteer at a group home for adults with mental health disabilities (had the people living there help with a lot of events we organized). I also think I had strong references. One was a professor from a different department than mine (women and gender studies) that I took a lot of electives with and did extra-curricular work with, but I think she would have done a good job at talking about my interests in diversity, oppression, inclusion, etc. The other was the executive director of the group home I volunteered at, so she probably did a good job of highlighting some of my specific skills with working with people with disabilities/marginalized folk. I spent a lot of time on my essays as well, including doing research to include in the answers (even though they are so short!).
  6. Hey! Congrats on your acceptances. I got into McMaster, Toronto, and Western, so am considering similar schools as you! I love the learning style at McMaster as well because the things that really transformed me academically in undergrad were the hands on, problem oriented experiences. I feel like this would allow us to be very independent practitioners early one which is important in a profession that is diverse and requires creativity. I also enjoy that McMaster guarantees you at least one mental health placement. If you don't mind me asking, what made U of T stick out as a top choice for you?
  7. Thank you so much for the reply! I was going over the U of T OT curriculum document again and I do have quite a few questions. Please don't feel obligated to answer all of them, any little bit of info is appreciated! 1) In the document, there seems to be a big focus on interprofessional education (placement opportunities, required IPE activities, etc). Have you found this to be the case so far in the program? If so, have you found this beneficial? 2) The document also mentions the importance of understanding occupation in terms of occupational justice, with a special emphasis on Indigenous Peoples (i.e. understanding how issues of oppression/inequality and the environment can impact occupational engagement). Have you noticed a big focus on this yet in the program or is this something that will mostly be focused on in a specific class? 3) It also mentioned there were case study classes and skills labs, which seem to be more hands on like McMasters problem-based learning. Have you had any case study classes/skills labs yet where they provide real life case based learning of scenarios? 4) Is there a mentor in your study group? I read something about a mentor being involved that helps you develop a professional identity and build a portfolio which sounded interesting! 5) Do you find that most of your classmates live very close to campus? I have mostly been finding affordable places anywhere from a 20-50 minute commute from campus. Do you think this is doable or would make the program demands too difficult? 6) Is there somewhere you know of where I can read course descriptions? I've read about the curriculum and educational framework, but have only come across course titles. Thank you again
  8. Congratulations to you too! I was talking to some current McMaster students at the MMI about their schedule, and it was very busy too. I think that is a common component throughout the programs! For McMaster, I love the learning pedagogy (these are the types of experiences that I took most from in undergrad and I feel prepare you to be independent and creative) and that you are guaranteed one mental health placement. I've had more luck getting a picture of McMasters program online and at the interview, so I hope that the open house at Toronto will make the decision clear for us!
  9. Hey everyone! Congratulations on all of you acceptances and I hope things go well for people on the wait list. I've been accepted to OT at McMaster, Toronto, and Western, but I am extremely torn between McMaster and Toronto and am finding it hard to weigh the pro's and con's since they're so unique from each other. I'm planning on going to the open house for Toronto, but input from any current OT students at either of these schools or anyone else would be greatly appreciated! How are the facilities at each school, how are the catchment areas/placement opportunities, are lectures often intimate or large, do you find your fellow students committed and passionate, etc. or anything else you could offer insight on! Thanks!
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