Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Rajalgool

Members
  • Content Count

    22
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Rajalgool

  • Rank
    Member

Recent Profile Visitors

385 profile views
  1. I took 19 (57 credits) undergrad courses to complete my prerequisites and upgrade my GPA. The whole time, I mostly had UBC in mind because they only look at your 5 prerequisites and 10 last upper-level courses. So i really catered my application to exactly what they were looking at. By a secondary function, I tried to apply to all the schools out east, but I ran into a lot of road blocks because they refused to accept any BC college credits, despite them being directly transferable to all BC universities. I truly found that there's so many little caveats that can basically exclude your post degree upgrades when applying to different schools, for instance, Mcgil won't even look at any post degree credits and Mcmaster and U of T have a blanket policy of no college credits, even for prerequisites. For this reason, a second degree definitely would have given me a better shot at a lot more schools and often schools will let you carry over up to 60 (2 years) credits form your first degree when doing a second degree, so it would have taken my around the same amount of time. I eventually got accepted to UBC and a few schools in the UK. But it was not without a ton of hard work on my application and interviews. My GPA was still fringe, but had I done another degree it would not have been. I would say if your GPA is NOT severely damaged like mine was (2.78/4.33), then upgrading courses at a University is the route to go. Otherwise it could be a long a fruitless effort. In which case take 2 more years to get a second degree could also be worth it. Also, you could potentially get a Master's degree - but some schools, like Queens told me that because Master's degrees tend to have inflated GPAs they don't like to consider them as much, whatever that means.
  2. It's probably best practice to scour the admissions page for the information that you're looking for and if you don't find it there, email the admissions department and they will be able to give you the clearest answer possible!
  3. A huge congrats to everyone that got accepted to programs today! I thought I had a shot at getting into Western, but was unsuccessful in both my Queens and Western applications this year. Thankfully I got into UBC, which was my first choice and dream. I think that it was probably related to being an In-province applicant. To all of you that didn't get in, don't give up! It took me 6 years to go from wanting to be a physio to actually getting into a program. It's an absolute journey, but if you learn to embrace the journey as one of life's many adventures then you will learn a lot along the way and also take away a massive life lesson. If you're solely focused on the destination, you will never be happy with where you're at. Keep working hard, talk to everyone you know about your passions and struggles - they will give you invaluable advice and research everything there is to know about these application processes and how to succeed. Again congratulations to everyone that was successful today and to those who weren't it's time to go back to the drawing board and figure out how to make your application more competitive next cycle!
  4. I have started to look into this as well. I am wondering if there are any good websites to explore finding scholarships on?
  5. In my experience, conveying to your professors that you have a specific goal to get into a competitive professional grad school program, and following up with them throughout the semester regarding your grades and how to improve in your course is a great segway into asking for that reference. It sounds like you have done some of that legwork. Creating a relationship with a professor over the course of a few classes and/or volunteering in their lab is another way to improve your chances of having them write you a strong letter. I'm not sure how many letters you need for Dal and Queens, but it would likely be worth putting in the extra time volunteering at the lab, like you said this will only strengthen your application as you will have research experience as well, which many programs look for. I think that you're on the right path! Good luck.
  6. Applied + (PT or OT?): PT UBC, Western, Queens, Brunel, St. George, Limerick, Dublin, Accepted: UBC, Limerick Interviews: UBC, Limerick, St. George (London) Waitlisted: Rejected: Brunel, Dublin, Queens and Western GPA: sGPA: 3.75 UBC GPA: 85% Perceived strength of essays/interviews/references: Essays were very strong spent a ton of time honing them and worked with several people proofreading and helping me improve them. Volunteered at a neuro physio clinic for a year and a half, over a thousand hours of volunteer and many relevant and cool life experiences as I am a mature applicant. Very strong academic and professional references. This was my second time applying and first time interviewing. I will say that I put a tremendous amount of work into my application and preparation for interviewing because I knew that my GPA was on the lower end of the applicants getting interviews. I gamed the CASPER test as hard as I could and I believe that I crushed it. By game, I mean a ton of practice and prep. I feel like I did really well on it and my preparation helped me with the interview as well. I will know how well I did on the CASPER if I get accepted to Western though. Practiced probably 50-60 MMI scenarios and did a full mock MMI two days before my interview. Practiced with people that had successfully gotten into programs that used mmi. My deposit for Limerick was due a week before we heard back from UBC and I paid 2000 euros to secure a spot, I'll never see that money again, but UBC was my first choice, so it doesn't really matter. I only say this because I feel that at a certain level you have to set yourself up for success in any way possible and I've wanted to get into physio for 5 years, so I did everything I could to ensure it. It's been a long road, 5 years ago I took physics 12. I had never had any success with science or math in my life, but I wanted physio, so I tried. Since that fall I've taken 18 courses for prereqs and GPA. I took my undergrad GPA from 2.75/4.33 to a 3.75/4.0 and got my UBC GPA to an 85. The reason I'm writing this is to hopefully inspire people to continue grinding. It might seem hopeless at some points, but if you want it, you will get there. The same way you work hard at classes is the same way you have to look at the entire application process and interview. Take nothing for granted. If you didn't get in this year, go back to the drawing board, figure out what classes to upgrade your GPA with, get your volunteering in order, take an ethics course (helps with interview and Casper) and talk with anyone and everyone about physio, for they might have the advice you need to crushing the application or mmi or Casper. Best of luck to everyone out there moving forward! Edit: Formatting
  7. Applied + (PT or OT?): PT UBC, Western, Queens, Brunel, St. George, Limerick, Dublin, Accepted: UBC, Limerick Interviews: UBC, Limerick, St. George (London) Waitlisted: Rejected: Brunel, Dublin, Queens and Western GPA: sGPA: 3.75 UBC GPA: 85% Perceived strength of essays/interviews/references: Essays were very strong spent a ton of time honing them and worked with several people proofreading and helping me improve them. Volunteered at a neuro physio clinic for a year and a half, over a thousand hours of volunteer and many relevant and cool life experiences as I am a mature applicant. Very strong academic and professional references. This was my second time applying and first time interviewing. I will say that I put a tremendous amount of work into my application and preparation for interviewing because I knew that my GPA was on the lower end of the applicants getting interviews. I gamed the CASPER test as hard as I could and I believe that I crushed it. By game, I mean a ton of practice and prep. I feel like I did really well on it and my preparation helped me with the interview as well. I will know how well I did on the CASPER if I get accepted to Western though. Practiced probably 50-60 MMI scenarios and did a full mock MMI two days before my interview. Practiced with people that had successfully gotten into programs that used mmi. My deposit for Limerick was due a week before we heard back from UBC and I paid 2000 euros to secure a spot, I'll never see that money again, but UBC was my first choice, so it doesn't really matter. I only say this because I feel that at a certain level you have to set yourself up for success in any way possible and I've wanted to get into physio for 5 years, so I did everything I could to ensure it. It's been a long road, 5 years ago I took physics 12. I had never had any success with science or math in my life, but I wanted physio, so I tried. Since that fall I've taken 18 courses for prereqs and GPA. I took my undergrad GPA from 2.75/4.33 to a 3.75/4.0 and got my UBC GPA to an 85. The reason I'm writing this is to hopefully inspire people to continue grinding. It might seem hopeless at some points, but if you want it, you will get there. The same way you work hard at classes is the same way you have to look at the entire application process and interview. Take nothing for granted. If you didn't get in this year, go back to the drawing board, figure out what classes to upgrade your GPA with, get your volunteering in order, take an ethics course (helps with interview and Casper) and talk with anyone and everyone about physio, for they might have the advice you need to crushing the application or mmi or Casper. Best of luck to everyone out there moving forward! Edit: Formatting
  8. Truth. I was more referring to the literal meaning of hands on. But I can see how that could easily be misinterpreted.
  9. Pretty sure for UBC your GPA is calculated based on your last 10 upper-level courses and your five pre-requisites (Anatomy, Physiology, Advanced Physiology, Statistics and Psychology). Although, I don't know if some of those classes are weighted differently in the calculation.
  10. Wondering if anyone here went to Limerick? Would love to talk with somebody that has some experience there. It sounds like a cool program with only 26 students per year and they fully fulfill the necessary practical hours for Canadian students. I want to know more about Limerick as a city and the program itself.
  11. To Brunnel and St. George's. Both In London. They have much lower standards for entrance and the tuition isn't vastly different from Canadian schools. Also seems like there is a good contingency of Canadians at those schools and they try to ensure that you get the necessary practical hours for your board exams. With that being said my GPA from my undergraduate is still too low and they do not look at any upgrades you have done, so I did not even get an invite to Brunnel, still waiting to hear back from St. George. I used Across the Pond to Apply and the advisor was helpful and the service was free. Also, you can still apply.
  12. I got my Interview too! So happy. Congrats everyone!!
  13. I got my rejection letter mid February last year for UBC PT.
×
×
  • Create New...