Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

downinggr

Members
  • Content Count

    19
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

downinggr last won the day on March 10

downinggr had the most liked content!

About downinggr

  • Rank
    Member

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Unfortunately living in Canada makes me OOS for the schools I am applying to.
  2. I'm a dual citizen by birth (Canada and USA if you were wondering), and having shadowed a physician in the United States, it was pretty clear that different values are held not only by the physicians, but the general population about healthcare. Surprisingly there were no expectations that healthcare should be universal or free by either party. I would argue the med students/physicians who did not talk about insurance with their patients were inadvertently racking up the bill without knowing whether or not they could pay, but I guess that's par for the course there. The physician I shadowed actually did not take insurance, but rather something called Direct Primary Care, which was a really cool idea, like a subscription for a physician, but still urged patients to keep insurance for acute hospitalizations or medications from pharmacies (despite the fact that he dispensed a variety of medications for his 'members' in house, nearly at cost). Realistically though, there's a good chance that I wind up in a private school in the United States, which would still cost a fortune, and yes I am fortunate that I can get loans from the United States Gov or US Private loan companies without needing to fish for a cosigner. Edict, there's a good chance you're right, but I still need to get an acceptance to an American school, which isn't guaranteed, and maybe just maybe I have improved enough to get myself off a waitlist next year at my in province school. At least I would have the option of returning to Canada, should I still want to after residency.
  3. Maybe if you had asked me if I was younger, I would say medicine as a career and financial reward would have pushed it into first place. However, I guess I've learned that money doesn't mean much in the grand scheme of pursuing happiness, and to me debt and thinking about debt seems like a source of stress. If only American education was more affordable, haha. Not to mention the near necessity of spending 7+ years in the States, where universal healthcare is still a controversial topic. I just wonder if I will have any regrets about a career as a pharmacist in 15-20 years.
  4. This year will be my third time applying for medical school in Canada, and should it all go well neither of these options will go any further. Unfortunately I'm growing restless, so I am trying to at least ensure I have some sort of direction in my life, hopefully by next September. So in that spirit I have also applied to American medical schools, and am strongly considering applying to several Canadian pharmacy schools. The former will require my family to move to the United States, not to mention the likely egregious medical school tuition that I will have to pay, while the latter will keep me in Canada and still leave professional career options open to me, even the option of owning my own business should I want to. As you can see, I am not particularly a fan of living in limbo as I am growing further from my mid-twenties, and I want some sort of stability for my family and daughter. Canadian premeds feel free to comment, and what would you do?
  5. I don't fully agree with your assessment @adhominem. DO schools in the United States are generating more graduates than ever, and with that being the case I certainly don't think OMT is going anywhere anytime soon. I also think you may be generalizing OMT a little bit too much. There is some evidence to show it is as effective as medications, physiotherapy or exercise in relieving some types of back pain. It certainly isn't a cure all, but it absolutely is a tool that shows some efficacy under specific circumstances and overwhelmingly low risk. To the OP: Just do an internet search for OMT training for MDs, and you should find information about what avenues may be available towards you. I am not an expert either, so please feel free to enlighten me with some additional information. To add more to the conversation about EBM (and this isn't meant to be pointed at anyone in particular, I don't want animosity towards anyone). Evidence based medicine is a fantastic tool at providing information about the efficacy of therapies in certain populations, and it certainly should be the tool which helps guide decision making and policy, but don't be fooled into thinking that it doesn't have its own limitations. The reality is there is a lot more nuance to individual patients, and personalized medicine is equally as important. Science and art.
  6. Lots of dollar bills. The exchange rate is brutal.
  7. Your best bet might be to shoot them an email!
  8. This thread is going out to current international students who are attempting to come back to Canada and having difficulties. If you are interested please look into MOTP surge in Canadian Armed Forces, it may give you an opportunity to come back home after all! Criteria: be a Canadian citizen; have obtained your medical degree. Please note that anyone who has obtained their medical education from a non-Canadian university is required to have their education evaluated to a Canadian standard; have participated in the match process of the CaRMS in 2019; and pass the screening process (e.g., medical, interview, security/background checks) for enrolment in the CAF.
  9. As far as I'm aware as long as you're a US citizen, you would be considered as an OOS applicant. I'm in the same boat as you citizenship-wise, and am applying to US schools this cycle after being waitlisted this year (just in case things don't pan out). Keep in mind you will also be eligible for US Federal Loans to fund your studies if you do get accepted in the United States. Problem with Ireland or other international locations would be the fact that you may have struggles getting US/Can residency.
  10. Heres to hoping lots of accepted NS students get into Ontario schools tomorrow! (and hopefully decide to go there!)
  11. I think it has to do with the fact there are no true english speaking Podiatry schools in Canada (as far as I'm aware), and most Anglo-Canadians would choose to go to a US Podiatry school, where another online forum may be more appropriate.
  12. Continue working, and apply again. How's everyone holding up in purgatory?
  13. Just a little thought that I felt compelled to share. For those of you that are fortunate enough to live in an area with Daylight Savings Time, just remember that decision letters are 1 hour closer than you may have thought.
  14. Nothing like our neurotic speculation to bring a thread back to life. To be fair there are probably many aspects to making the requirement more lenient. Maybe to prevent OOP taking NB seats, maybe to increase revenue to offset costs of applications or maybe even things I haven't thought about yet. We might just have a little bit too much time on our hands to think about it.
×
×
  • Create New...