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bzora

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  1. My two cents... I am a Canadian, (from Edmonton,) and completed my medical degree in Australia, graduating in 2013, and now hold dual licensure (Family Medicine) in Australia and Canada. I work at the University of Tasmania School of Medicine. The process of holding dual licensure was difficult for me, only because I didn't have a guide in how to do it. It really doesn't have to be that challenging, and the aim of our program is to streamline the process of medical education for Canadians who want to keep their options open. In my role at UTas, I supervise the Canadian Pathway - a program designed for Canadians who wish to study medicine in Australia, while completing all of the necessary requirements for internship in Australia, as well as application to Canadian residencies through CARMS. I can confirm that 100% of our UTas medical graduates - including all international graduates in the last 65 years - have secured either an Australian internship upon graduation, or placed into a residency in their home country, including Canada. We are the only medical school in Australia that has that record, but the odds are still very favourable at other Australian medical schools. One of the contributors above mentioned that a significant number of Canadians actually choose to stay in Australia following graduation, and this is definitely true - there are so many Canadian doctors in Tasmania! I suspect it has something to do with the climate and great work/life balance (even within training programs.) Hope this information helps.
  2. Not all Australian medical schools require the MCAT. I work for the University of Tasmania School of Medicine, and we have created a Canadian Pathway - designed for Canadian students who want to study medicine in Australia, and keep their options open and apply for Australian internship as well as Canadian residencies through CARMS. We are a 5yr medical degree, and our Canadian medical graduates will have completed all of the Australian requirements for internship, as well as all Canadian exams, plus completion of their electives at our partner university, Memorial University in Newfoundland. The added bonus is that we don't require the MCAT for admission. We use an entrance exam called the ISAT. It is a computer-based 3hr exam designed to assess problem solving skills, rather than science knowledge. It is designed to be taken without studying, as the goal of the exam is to give us a profile of how your brain critically appraises and solves problems. It can be taken at most testing centres in North America. Our Canadian applicants this year were able to take the exam in Canada, so it seems that Covid has not limited exam centre availability, which has been reassuring for applicants. Bit of background: I am a Canadian, (from Edmonton,) and completed my medical degree in Australia, graduating in 2013, and now hold dual licensure (Family Medicine) in Australia and Canada. The process of holding dual licensure was difficult for me, only because I didn't have a guide in how to do it. It really doesn't have to be that difficult, and the aim of our program is to streamline the process of medical education for Canadians who want to keep their options open. I hope this information is helpful and I hope you pursue medicine. It is certainly the best thing I have ever done. Bailey
  3. A bit of info to consider: I am a Canadian, and completed my medical degree in Australia, and now hold dual licensure (Family Medicine,) in Australia and Canada. I work for the University of Tasmania School of Medicine, and we have created a Canadian Pathway, with these exact needs in mind. I supervise the program because of my experience in both countries. It is designed for Canadian students who want to keep their options open and apply for Australian internship as well as Canadian residencies through CARMS. Upon graduating from our 5yr medical degree, (undergrad and post-grad entry,) Canadian medical graduates will have completed all of the Australian requirements for internship, as well as the MCCQE1 and MCCQE2 +/- NAC-OSCE, plus completion of their electives at our partner university, Memorial University in Newfoundland. (This gives our Canadian students a chance to network within the CDN health care system, securing them with a highly competitive application should they decide to apply for Canadian residencies.) The process of holding dual licensure was difficult for me, only because I didn't have a guide in how to do it. It really doesn't have to be that difficult, and the aim of our program is to streamline the process of medical education for Canadians who want to keep their options open. For what it is worth, I would be very cautious about accepting advice from people who say there is no chance of securing an internship in Australia. 100% of our graduates (since 1965) have earned an internship - and we are the only medical school in Australia that has this record. * Additionally, it is worth noting that DO graduates who wish to apply to Canadian residencies through CARMS, are now lumped into the same applicant pool as IMGs. This has not always been the case, which historically made DO an appealing option for Canadians. I suspect this will see a drastic reduction in the number of Canadians applying to DO programs. I hope this information is helpful.
  4. Are you sure your husband is limited to applying to NT? I was not a PR when I applied to GP Training in Tasmania in 2016 and successfully finished my training without any problems. (As luck would have it I was granted PR about a week before I started GP Training, so I am not sure if it would have continued to be an issue.)
  5. For what it is worth... I am Canadian (Alberta) and went to medical school in Australia at Bond University (QLD.) I decided to consider Australia after not getting interviews in Canada two years in a row, despite what I thought was a great and well-rounded application. I knew chances for an internship following graduation would be limited so I applied in Tasmania, where there is still no internship crisis. (Tasmania still boasts 100% success rate for its graduates finding internships.) I completed my Family Med/GP Training in Tasmania, and fairly effortlessly got Permanent Residency and then Citizenship. I now actually work for the University of Tasmania School of Medicine, redesigning the program for Int'l students, in an effort to make repatriation to Canada smoother. Since completing my Family Med/GP Training, I have completed/earned my Licentiate of the Medical Council of Canada. Yes it was a lot of hoops to jump through, but not at all impossible. I get to live in a spectacularly beautiful state, in a wonderful country, in a job I love. I would do it all again in a heartbeat, I just wish I had some guidance at the time, because it can be a tricky path to navigate for the first time. While the logistics of attending medical school in Australia are more challenging than attending in one's home country, it remains a very doable pathway to achieving a career in medicine.
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