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drdaydream

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  1. I had read something on [website that starts with r] about a UofT professor not submitting reference on time...this may have been yours? In any case, it has been in my thoughts this whole time! I am so so relieved and happy for you, I cannot imagine what a stressful time that must have been. I am so glad it's worked out!! Best of luck, fingers crossed for your interviews!
  2. I actually think 3.9 is very good, but some people want to keep improving so I gave advice accordingly!
  3. I think 6-8 weeks is probably reasonable especially assuming you're a full-time student and will have to practice around your school responsibilities. You definitely don't need to be studying 24 hours a day for 6-8 weeks lol. You're not cramming for an exam. But there's lots of things you can be doing in that time, there's learning: in the beginning researching CASPer, the format, learning about types of questions, learning about how to structure your answers, finding sample questions and answers, reading up on some medical ethics, reading up on current issues and news. And practicing: practicing with sample questions and scenarios so you can apply your strategies, practicing with timed questions and tests, etc. I would definitely spend more than a weekend prepping for MMI, or any interview really
  4. Lots of people in your shoes! My first year of university was okay but was definitely a wake up call. Advice I would give to my first year-self: You're not alone! Talk to others. Form study groups. Join the premed community at your school. It helps so much to know there's other people on the same journey as you. Good luck
  5. A thank you card would be very nice! If you feel awkward about it, you can always ask someone in the office to hand it to them, or you could even mail it!. Although I don't think there's anything to feel awkward about, it's a nice gesture and I'm sure they would love to receive it in person!
  6. I think if you're pressed for time and the choice is between leaving a question blank or answering short form, go for bullet points. As long as your points are still coherent, concise, demonstrate the key points, etc.
  7. Yes you will be considered an IMG and you will have to very likely redo residency here. I would caution against it. Take a look at averaged accepted GPAs and scores for all schools in Canada and US to get a sense of where your best chances are! Good luck
  8. Online volunteering might be good depending on what you learn from it and what experiences you gain, but I would say only in conjunction with other "real life" direct, physical volunteering. If, come med school application time, you only have online volunteering, you will not be as competitive as the thousands of applicants who have done the hospitals, soup kitchens, libraries etc. Admissions committees will want to see you have direct interactions with members of the community. Meridian recommended the CanMeds framework as a guide and I totally agree - here it is for reference. There are so so so many volunteer opportunities and places that need extra hands, so I am sure you can find something near to you in your community!
  9. Hmm, would you be able to get in touch with someone from the Queen/Dal admissions team to ask about your specific siuation? In my experience, schools are really nice about answering questions from potential applicants
  10. Take care of yourself friend! Your health is always priority. Again every school is different in how they will evaluate you, so look into individual school requirements. Please also check out some resources on campus that can support you, whether it's through accessibility services, counselling, etc. Good luck with your Masters.
  11. Yes! Agreed, I really like the refugee advocacy group suggestion. If he will face prosecution in his home country, he can try to seek asylum. What you can do: sympathize, offer (emotional) support, help connect to resources. In this situation you are not qualified to be legal aid and you do not want to become involved with unethical and illegal activity. This way you can your friend get connected to groups and resources who have better knowledge of how to help him legally and have helped many of those in his situation before find more long-term solutions.
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