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Canadian MED

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  1. In general, how do medical/graduate schools look at repeat courses? I'm transferring to a new university this coming fall (making me a first year again) therefore I have the opportunity to retake some of the courses I have already taken at my previous school. In this case, would it still be a "retake" if the course codes are different? For example I took Intro to Psychology first year but my new school also offers a similar course for first years called Psychology - Foundations. I'm a little confused on whether or not I should be taking the course again or just find some other electives to fill these gaps ... same with biology ( Biology 1 vs. Intro to Biology). Additionally, my transferred credits do not come with a grade to my new university just a credit. Does that mean the course/grade won't count when it comes to grad school application? A little confused about all this, appreciate any help!
  2. Gotcha, thanks for the info. With applications under so much scrutiny it’s hard to know what’s going through the reviewer’s mind; seems like anything could lead to a rejection haha.
  3. Hey guys, just wanted to ask a question here for a friend. My former classmate is currently in a BioMedical program at Western and wants to transfer into a chemical engineering program (to which he has been accepted) at a different university. His end goal is still to apply to medical school but he feels like his skills (and marks) would shine more in that program and finds his current program to be an uncomfortable fit. So I guess the question is will medical schools frown upon switching from a “premed” degree to something that’s completely unrelated? I understand that they don’t care about your undergrad given some people may want to change careers but I feel a little uneasy for him as he is transferring from a biology degree to something unrelated not the other way around. Will this show indecision or lack of interest for the field? I’m spitballing here but just want to know if there should be any concern to what he is planning to do. I know applications are examined under a microscope and I’m guessing this could be a red flag? Appreciate any input. Cheers
  4. Appreciate all the input guys. It seems like not all of my buddy's classmates "networked" really well during their final few years of training and feel that they may not have enough strong connections in their pockets for when they graduate. When searching for jobs, can students apply nationally across Canada or are they somewhat restricted to the Province in which they completed their residency? If I'm not mistaken there seems to be different licensing procedures associate with each Province; have any graduates actually got licenses for other areas just to broaden their search for employment?
  5. For these "easier to find jobs" do you wait for job listings like regular jobs or are these all internal hirings from connections, residencies, and so forth?
  6. I recently spoke with a friend of mine who is finishing up their residency out west and we were discussing the job market for physicians in Canada. It seems like even after all those years of school, internships, etc. the process of getting a stable job (not even in a preferred location) is somewhat of a gamble and job prospects may be bleak. Is this true? Also, are most jobs in medicine obtained by connections and references during your residencies and fellowships? Judging by what my friend is going through, applying for a job is pretty different than in other professions where you scour job listings online or knock on doors. When so much of someone's life and money has been invested into school I feel like finding a job is more difficult than it should be. I may be wrong since I don't hear a lot about physician unemployment but a lot of his classmates are also going through similar situations. Can anyone provide some insight into this topic?
  7. Awesome, appreciate all the information! I’ve gotten a sense of what I need now. Just to make sure, verifiers are only asked to verify your claims and nothing else correct? Therefore these can just be office or front desk staff that have access to the database, logs, etc. but may never have met me directly? Or would it be safer to put someone who have a least met me and can talk a little about me if potentially asked?
  8. Do all extracurriculars need both a referee and a verifier? The latter shouldn’t be an issue but referees are where I may run into some trouble. Would I be able to get away on the application with verifiers for all my ECs and referees for 2-3 important ones?
  9. Well that takes some of the fun out of extracurriculars haha. Didn’t know applications are so strict! All of the organizations I’ve been apart of have an electronic copy of my involvement somewhere in their system; is that enough? I’m guessing they value “personal positive feedback” directly from supervisors but I doubt they’ll get any. I worked in S&R a year ago and was under the supervision of 4 different people in the 4 months I was there. The only people that could possibly speak deeply about me are my coworker friends, do they count as references/verifiers or do they need to be above your certain rank? Guess I’ll try and form some newer connections in the future!
  10. Thanks for the tips! Getting a reference form/letter should be easiest when you're still involved or just after you've left. Can those stand in as verification or are they not too useful if written before a certain date? I'm just wondering how all of you keep in touch with supervisors from 4 or 5 years ago ... even though I formed relationships and made quite an impression I'm sure that won't last long in the larger corporations or government programs as people come and go. If the schools called my "references" they probably won't even know who I am given that was years ago and my supervisor was likely replaced. Also, I'm guessing hobbies are the only things that don't need a backup? Maybe bring a guitar to the interview in case they question your abilities and you need to play a song for them lol
  11. I'm not too familiar with the extracurricular and volunteering portion of medical school applications and I'm wondering how many (if not all) of the activities or jobs you list need to be backed up with a reference with contact information or verifiable hours worked? I have always been quite active in clubs, organizations, and extracurriculars in my free time but haven't previously felt the need to "document" my time or contributions since I was there for the heck of it. For future reference, do you guys have a way of documenting and proving your involvement in a past activity for the applications a few years down the road? I've never tracked my hours nor have I ever asked my supervisors for LORs. I may be forgetful or even a little embarrassed myself to ask for these things (especially if I was volunteering) and I was wondering what approach I should take in the future? To be honest, I have forgotten the names of some of my past colleagues due to the shear time I've been away and I'm sure some of them only have a faint memory of me haha. Thanks in advance!
  12. How challenging is it as a family medicine physician to relocate across provinces in Canada and find employment? Are there additional licensing requirements for positions outside the province you completed your residency? Cheers
  13. Appreciate the breakdown! Seems that being competitive helps get you in anywhere haha. Given that OOP seats fluctuate, that that mean OOP applicants also compete against IP applicants? Let's say an OOP individual outscores most of the other OOP applicants but many IP applicants (outside the 85+%) outscore the OOP individual; will the school then favour the IP students and reduce the number of OOP seats? (more of a specific question) Cheers
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