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Borborygmi

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Borborygmi last won the day on February 18 2016

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About Borborygmi

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  1. Reading through the comments on the admissions blog is beyond infuriating. How selfish and self-absorbed are many of the applicants this year. Sometimes it's ok to realize that there is something bigger than you going on (LIKE AN ACTUAL F*CKING GLOBAL PANDEMIC) and to sit down and shut up. The entitlement in the discussion thread is absolutely nauseating. Get some perspective. Honestly... Tell the patients in ICUs fighting for their life or people whose bodies are stacked in the back of trucks in blocks-long military convoys that "it's not fair". Be embarrassed. Unbelievable.
  2. PGY-2 in neurology here. PM if you'd like or ask your question(s) publicly in the thread and we can make the info available to all. There are few neurology threads on the forum and others may have similar questions.
  3. Just email the PD if you want to meet with the PD. If you know who the chief resident is/scheduler for the group, then email them as well regarding the call question. Honestly, we are all humans. Taking initiative to reach out shows interest. In my opinion, if a program punishes you for taking initiative or has a problem with your approach knowing how few electives people receive then I would perhaps give consideration to whether it's a program that is right for you. Being annoying is one thing, sending a couple of short emails is another. The program coordinators also receive a ton of emails. It may have just been that your original note slipped through the cracks. Just my two cents.
  4. As another update, Ottawa now has one neurologist from France with stroke and neurointerventional fellowship training. A second stroke neurologist is completing his interventional training in Ottawa after doing some of his fellowship in the US and will be staff thereafter.
  5. 100% agreed. I burned out really hard going into my final year of undergrad as a result. Sometimes, if that's what you have to do to make end meets and also achieve your goal.... it's worth the cost. If you can find a better balance, that would obviously be more ideal.
  6. I don't check here as often as I once did, but I'm happy to chat if you have questions. 35 when I entered med school, now 39 as a PGY-2. Send me a PM any time.
  7. I found the Case Files series of books useful in med school for the basics of common presentations. https://www.amazon.ca/s?k=case+files+internal+medicine&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsv_aq9vg5QIVRdyGCh1f4ACMEAAYASAAEgKyefD_BwE&hvadid=208290943416&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9000678&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17024519830428346821&hvtargid=kwd-301882008468&hydadcr=9043_9621330&tag=googcana-20&ref=pd_sl_3v4py0isrl_e Another is the Hui resource for internal medicine https://www.amazon.ca/s?k=internal+medicine+hui&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI3pKn4Nvg5QIVAniGCh02awM0EAAYASAAEgIsdPD_BwE&hvadid=230027861511&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9000678&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=b&hvrand=1900500495644391093&hvtargid=kwd-308365313488&hydadcr=2436_10293348&tag=googcana-20&ref=pd_sl_2m5ikxmirr_b The Washington Manual for internal medicine is also good. As is the Massachusetts University manual for internal medicine. Any of the above would be useful a reasonable starting point for internal med. Good luck!
  8. I would suggest thinking about the interests you have and about pursuing those interests. The way your question reads makes me wonder if you're looking for something because it would look good on a cv.
  9. I didn't have anyone proof-read my top 10s. If you're going to have someone take a look at your submission, I would suggest getting someone familiar with the CanMEDS framework and how to write essays meant to touch upon the categories within the framework.
  10. I was. Mid-thirties career change for me and there were a number of us in my UofC graduating class. I feel this is becoming even more commonplace.
  11. The opportunity provides growth. There is no prescription for admission to med school, but more than that I would suggest doing things that are enriching, fulfilling, and that genuinely interest you. You can spin anything as a strength for med applications, but that really shouldn't be what it's about, in my opinion. Cool opportunity!
  12. I had to do a second undergrad degree before thinking about medicine and began my second degree at 29; accepted to medical school at 35. There was another student in my class who was older than me (either 38 or 40... I don't recall at this point). The average age of people accepted to medicine seems to be increasing. If it's something you really want to pursue, go for it! There were many people 30+ in my class. Best of luck!
  13. Nope. I went to a three year school and mentioned in my post that for 2 of 3 years that I found it super easy. In clerkship, free time is definitely scaled way back. I found I would have to integrate my exercise in different ways (often sporadically). I would cycle to work maybe 1-3 times per week. Depending on which hospital I was at, this was anywhere between maybe 12 and 35 km per day. Then gym, yoga, or swimming with friends other times. On average, I would say I would do 5-8 hours of exercise per week in clerkship vs definitely upwards of 20-25 hours per week prior to clerkship. I do have friends in class that exercised much more regularly than I did during clerkship. One classmate in particular cycled somehwere around 25-40km per day every single day, even in winter. His strava is very next level.
  14. Soooo much free time in med school to workout and take care of yourself. I was exercising 2-4 hours per day throughout my first 2 of 3 years of med school and it was glorious. I absolutely did not study anywhere near 5 hours per day. For the purposes of doing well during medical school (with the exception of the 5-7 days leading up to an exam), studying 8-10 hours per week is much more than ample if you pick things up relatively quickly. Residency is a different matter. I workout in the mornings at 5:30-6:00 usually 3ish times per week when not in a horrible call cycle and when it's not cold enough to xc ski outside or warm enough to cycle. I don't know how this would compare to dentistry.
  15. A classmate of mine went through this transition. Many people with past careers from a variety of areas (myself included) were in my graduating med school class. I would just make sure you understand all that you will have to go through going down the medicine path. It's very long, tiring, and demanding. I would even say the expectations are at many times unrealistic. I love it every day and am grateful for what I'm doing, but if you go in without understanding the demands there is the risk of becoming resentful and bitter. I have seen this happen with many of my colleagues.
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