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Borborygmi

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  1. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from LostLamb in Interview Cancelation   
    Reading through the comments on the admissions blog is beyond infuriating. How selfish and self-absorbed are many of the applicants this year. Sometimes it's ok to realize that there is something bigger than you going on (LIKE AN ACTUAL F*CKING GLOBAL PANDEMIC) and to sit down and shut up. The entitlement in the discussion thread is absolutely nauseating. Get some perspective. Honestly...

    Tell the patients in ICUs fighting for their life or people whose bodies are stacked in the back of trucks in blocks-long military convoys that "it's not fair". Be embarrassed. Unbelievable.
  2. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from annaham in Interview Cancelation   
    Reading through the comments on the admissions blog is beyond infuriating. How selfish and self-absorbed are many of the applicants this year. Sometimes it's ok to realize that there is something bigger than you going on (LIKE AN ACTUAL F*CKING GLOBAL PANDEMIC) and to sit down and shut up. The entitlement in the discussion thread is absolutely nauseating. Get some perspective. Honestly...

    Tell the patients in ICUs fighting for their life or people whose bodies are stacked in the back of trucks in blocks-long military convoys that "it's not fair". Be embarrassed. Unbelievable.
  3. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from LostLamb in .   
    I would suggest thinking about the interests you have and about pursuing those interests. The way your question reads makes me wonder if you're looking for something because it would look good on a cv. 
  4. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from elephante in Apprehensions About Starting Med   
    There are many thoughtful posts in this thread. I really appreciate you laying your thoughts and feelings out for everyone here to see, radames. I think one of the biggest strings of thought in this thread is that you're not alone. Many of us are experiencing similar apprehensions and I think it's quite common for people in medical school and others who are well into practicing to consider if medicine is the right fit for them. Inevitably, I think this happens in any career path--and I'm an example of someone who has spent many years in one career, considered what it means to be doing it on a daily basis, and realizing what I was doing was not the right direction for me. It shows maturity and awareness of self that you're able to consider what you are considering right now and I think that it's natural to have apprehension about what is going to become real for you pretty soon. What nobody else can answer is whether you really want to take that leap.
     
    I know a number of people with similar backgrounds as yours who have gone through medical school to become excellent physicians: An opera singer, an artist, a writer, and a philosopher to name a few. One of the things that makes them such excellent physicians is their ability to relate to people through experiences that many others who are pursuing or practicing medicine don't have. This is why diversity in medicine is important. You offer an interesting perspective and different journey than many other people and I think that's something to be embraced.
     
    I'm an older applicant--mid-30's--and I come from an art direction background before pursuing a career change for medical school. I'm incredibly grateful for the opportunity to go down this path and I'm very excited about the possibilities that have opened up before me. But I also feel a lot of apprehension, sometimes panic, about the first day of classes coming closer. The biggest surprise for me happened the day of my acceptance and is still something I'm very conscious of daily since (I was shocked that I didn't consider it more carefully beforehand). On the day of my acceptance, I was walking down the street after work just beaming. I happened to look up at a group of people standing on the corner, waiting to cross the street. This wave of panic washed over me in that moment when I considered that at some point in time, I could be responsible for someone's life... how that would impact them, their family member's, and loved ones... etc., and I wondered in that moment if I was capable of doing that work. It's such an enormous responsibility that I hadn't so clearly considered until that moment. I'm glad I feel that because I think it's grounding. I hope one day the thoughts you're having help you to feel grounded as well.
  5. Thanks
    Borborygmi got a reaction from etAl in Question Regarding Leave of Absence   
    The opportunity provides growth. There is no prescription for admission to med school, but more than that I would suggest doing things that are enriching, fulfilling, and that genuinely interest you. You can spin anything as a strength for med applications, but that really shouldn't be what it's about, in my opinion. Cool opportunity! 
  6. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from tennie in How old is too old to apply for medicine?   
    I had to do a second undergrad degree before thinking about medicine and began my second degree at 29; accepted to medical school at 35. There was another student in my class who was older than me (either 38 or 40... I don't recall at this point). 

    The average age of people accepted to medicine seems to be increasing. If it's something you really want to pursue, go for it! There were many people 30+ in my class. Best of luck!
  7. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from drmagoss in How old is too old to apply for medicine?   
    I had to do a second undergrad degree before thinking about medicine and began my second degree at 29; accepted to medical school at 35. There was another student in my class who was older than me (either 38 or 40... I don't recall at this point). 

    The average age of people accepted to medicine seems to be increasing. If it's something you really want to pursue, go for it! There were many people 30+ in my class. Best of luck!
  8. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from 2020medvision in Would you recommend doing another year of school?   
    The vast majority of residency positions are not anywhere near this competitive. I would even argue that the areas where physicians are most needed are the least competitive. As per the CaRMS data, the most competitive specialties have a 1:3 position:applicant's-first-choice ratio, so I'm not even sure what specialty you were applying to that was 3:40 unless you're an IMG.

    Re: OP. If you see your fourth your being on track for high 3.8_ to 3.9, I would do one additional year of undergrad since you'll be needing your fourth year's gpa to be truly competitive. While I think you have a shot with your current stats, I do think it will be challenging.

    If you pull your gpa up a touch, you can also apply out-of-province as many schools' doors are open with a 3.8+ gpa for OOP. There is also weighting at many schools which may also play in your favour. MCAT will be an additional hurdle, but take one step at a time. 

    As for the bigger picture, I think you'll find a way to commit to your grades if medicine is what you want, but you're not far off. If you can adjust just a little bit, I think you have a reasonable shot! Good luck :).
  9. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from moonwalker2099 in Thank You notes   
    I wrote thank you e-mails to people I connected well with after my interviews. I don't think it's necessary, but I do think that reaching out to places where you really think it would be a good fit is worthwhile. I wouldn't be sending out a copy-and-paste thank you template e-mail to every program. I view that as disingenuous and maybe a little tacky. Politely thanking people and showing gratitude on the day is enough in that regard. And I certainly got replies that said more than "you're welcome".

    Good luck with interviews this year! It's a super fun (and tiring) time. Try to enjoy it!
  10. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from PatrickJ in Would you recommend doing another year of school?   
    The vast majority of residency positions are not anywhere near this competitive. I would even argue that the areas where physicians are most needed are the least competitive. As per the CaRMS data, the most competitive specialties have a 1:3 position:applicant's-first-choice ratio, so I'm not even sure what specialty you were applying to that was 3:40 unless you're an IMG.

    Re: OP. If you see your fourth your being on track for high 3.8_ to 3.9, I would do one additional year of undergrad since you'll be needing your fourth year's gpa to be truly competitive. While I think you have a shot with your current stats, I do think it will be challenging.

    If you pull your gpa up a touch, you can also apply out-of-province as many schools' doors are open with a 3.8+ gpa for OOP. There is also weighting at many schools which may also play in your favour. MCAT will be an additional hurdle, but take one step at a time. 

    As for the bigger picture, I think you'll find a way to commit to your grades if medicine is what you want, but you're not far off. If you can adjust just a little bit, I think you have a reasonable shot! Good luck :).
  11. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from MountainAmoeba in non Traditional Experience   
    I would argue that it's really only about how you reflect on the experience. You can learn a lot from success, but often more from failure. Any experience that's meaningful to you has the potential of being a good top 10 entry. Just relate your experience to the canmeds roles in your top 10.
  12. Haha
    Borborygmi got a reaction from trimethoprim in Average amount of student debt at the end of med school?   
    270k at the end of med school. Had to maintain two houses and fly from one side of the country to the other every 3-4 weeks to maintain a long distance marriage. No help from provincial loans as I've never qualified for them.
  13. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from ThatCanadianGuy in non Traditional Experience   
    I would argue that it's really only about how you reflect on the experience. You can learn a lot from success, but often more from failure. Any experience that's meaningful to you has the potential of being a good top 10 entry. Just relate your experience to the canmeds roles in your top 10.
  14. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from End Poverty in Tips for First Year Med Student   
    First, CONGRATULATIONS on your offer. UofC has an amazing family of students and staff and I'll miss so many of the people I've grown to love in my graduating class. 

    My biggest piece of advice for most of first year is to just get used to the new language you'll be learning, get to know your classmates, discover what works best for you for study and organization, and develop a solid wellness routine that can hopefully be carried through to the end of clerkship. Once you feel you have these things on lock, then consider taking on ECs, research, and what-have-you to help make you competitive for the CaRMS match if you are choosing to focus on a competitive specialty. There are also a lot of great student run groups that are specialty specific that you could become involved with. I do think it's a reasonably good idea to shadow docs in specialties that you think you might want to pursue in first year. Just know that your knowledge in the first year obviously isn't the best. The main idea would be to see if you enjoy the bread-and-butter and day-to-day work that the doc you're shadowing deals with.

    I think if you start building your CV towards the end of first year (which is around February, I think?), then you'll be fine. Also keep in mind that oftentimes you will do well during the CaRMS match if your personality matches whatever group you're applying to and you're teachable. There are examples where this hasn't worked out, clearly, but I wouldn't underestimate these attributes. 

    If you have any specific questions, fire away. 
  15. Thanks
    Borborygmi got a reaction from Confluence in Tips for First Year Med Student   
    First, CONGRATULATIONS on your offer. UofC has an amazing family of students and staff and I'll miss so many of the people I've grown to love in my graduating class. 

    My biggest piece of advice for most of first year is to just get used to the new language you'll be learning, get to know your classmates, discover what works best for you for study and organization, and develop a solid wellness routine that can hopefully be carried through to the end of clerkship. Once you feel you have these things on lock, then consider taking on ECs, research, and what-have-you to help make you competitive for the CaRMS match if you are choosing to focus on a competitive specialty. There are also a lot of great student run groups that are specialty specific that you could become involved with. I do think it's a reasonably good idea to shadow docs in specialties that you think you might want to pursue in first year. Just know that your knowledge in the first year obviously isn't the best. The main idea would be to see if you enjoy the bread-and-butter and day-to-day work that the doc you're shadowing deals with.

    I think if you start building your CV towards the end of first year (which is around February, I think?), then you'll be fine. Also keep in mind that oftentimes you will do well during the CaRMS match if your personality matches whatever group you're applying to and you're teachable. There are examples where this hasn't worked out, clearly, but I wouldn't underestimate these attributes. 

    If you have any specific questions, fire away. 
  16. Like
    Borborygmi reacted to Crash Bandit in Music For Studying?   
    Great list - thanks for these : -)
  17. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from CLIC5A in Have anyone's verifiers been checked yet?   
    @sp4168 It really doesn't matter. Like I said, it's completely random. You may or may not have verifiers checked and whether you have or have not interviewed or applied in the past would have no bearing on verifier checks or chances. I'm sure Dr. Walker would have stated these things in his pre-/post-amble. He's a fantastic guy and works very hard to make the process as level a playing field for everyone as it can be.
  18. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from Crash Bandit in Music For Studying?   
    Lighter -
    Nils Frahm - Solo
    Hans Zimmer - Inception
    Fizzarum - How Nature Works
    A Winged Victory for the Sullen - Self titled
    Keith Kenniff - Branches
    Deaf Center - Owl Splinters
    Balmorhea - HEIR
    Tim Hecker - Harmony in Ultraviolet
    Loscil - Endless Falls
    Julianna Barwick - Pacing
    Library Tapes - Sun Peeking Through
    Dreyma - Askja
    Aes Dana - Pollen

    Heavier -
    Plini - Sweet Nothings
    Plini - Other Things
    Chimp Spanner - Imperium Vorago
    Animals As Leaders - Weightless
    Chon - Newborn Sun
    Scale the Summit - The Collective
    Intervals - In Time
    Pomegranate Tiger - Entities
    Vessels - Helioscope
    Widek - Multiverse

    All of the above are without vocals. If you don't find vocals distracting while studying (I typically do), a couple of great albums I've listened to heavily over the past couple of years:
    Agnes Obel - Citizen of Glass
    Moulettes - Preternatural

    Hopefully you enjoy something in there :).
  19. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from MountainAmoeba in Have anyone's verifiers been checked yet?   
    @sp4168 It really doesn't matter. Like I said, it's completely random. You may or may not have verifiers checked and whether you have or have not interviewed or applied in the past would have no bearing on verifier checks or chances. I'm sure Dr. Walker would have stated these things in his pre-/post-amble. He's a fantastic guy and works very hard to make the process as level a playing field for everyone as it can be.
  20. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from CLIC5A in Have anyone's verifiers been checked yet?   
    Verification is random. Many people may never have their verifiers contacted; mine weren't. Not to worry :). Best of luck!
  21. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in apply to med in your thirties?   
    In at 35 after going back for additional undergrad for a few years before being accepted. I've often reflected on whether I would do the whole thing again. It was a very, very difficult period of time. It was also a realistic possibility that I would never gain acceptance--getting into med school in Canada is quite difficult. I'm not sure I would undertake the process again, but I'm very happy to be in medicine. I love it just about every day. It does require a lot of sacrifice and the expectations are pretty unrealistic. Especially if you have a family already. I would just say, know what you're getting yourself into before taking the leap. 
  22. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from Edict in Nervous about number of unmatched CMGs   
    It's really nasty and likely only to get worse in years to come... some really great people in my class did not match. I feel for them. I also realized through the CaRMS tour that another factor is personality. Once you get an interview somewhere, a really large part of the match is how you connect with your interviewers. It doesn't much matter who you are on paper whether it's # of publications, PhD, etc. if there isn't good chemistry. Inevitably, the process seems to favour extroverts. I feel very fortunate to have matched and feel horrible for people that weren't as lucky.
    From my understanding, last year 95% matched in 1st iteration. This year, 91.5% matched in first iteration. 8% of my class was unsuccessful in the first round. Only slightly above the national average.
  23. Like
    Borborygmi reacted to humhum in Unfilled carms spots   
    People obsess over what electives they took, and how many specialties they can apply to, with who they are doing research etc. and how it all gets interpreted by the selection committee.  All of these factors are absolutely dwarfed by the monstrous magnitude of one singular factor: that is, someone on the selection committee really liking you. You could have done 20 weeks of psych, and 2 weeks of plastics, and if you have one guy on the plastics selection committee that will go on the bat for you, not only are you guaranteed an interview, but you have a higher chance of matching to plastic than someone who has done 10 publications in the field. I have seen this scenario over and over- if you don't believe me, ask the residents in each competitive specialty what they did in their third and fourth year.
    How do they get to like you, and be your champion? It helps if have someone on the inside who is a family member, or buddy of your mom or dad, or someone that lives in your own hood, or has early male pattern baldness like yourself, or finds you sexually attractive, or likes that you are ugly so you don't threaten their self-esteem, or maybe plays the trumpet like you, likes the sound of your voice, likes that you talk a lot, or likes that you don't, etc. etc. etc., and a million other unmodifiable factors that are pure luck and circumstance.
    I'm telling you this because I have personally been on both sides of this. A selection member of a surgical specialty asked me to apply and told me point blank I would rank me top 3, and I had done nothing but be a friend of a friend. For fuck's sake, my suturing skills were poorer than the psychiatry gunner on rotation with me. (I didn't want to do that specialty so I didn't apply). Another PD point blank told me she would not write me a letter of reference, after I was basically running half her clinic independently and demonstrated I could manage her patients at an R2 level. Why? She could not even remember my name when I asked for the letter.  Another selection member wrote me a glowing letter that got me an interview at the country's most competitive program for that specialty, but I didn't even get an interview at my own home university. Why? Because on the first day we talked about our love of indie music, and didn't stop talking about it for next 4 weeks. On one of the interviews, the interviewers sounded shocked I had actually done an elective with them just three months prior. They had no recollection of me whatsoever. That program was my number 1 rank. I didn't match to it, but my classmate who had it as one of his bottom choices, matched to it. At the end I matched to my second choice program, but had not even done an elective there. And you can guess why I got in.
    This is why you have to hedge your bets, and pay attention to the stats. If you apply to FM, Internal, and Psych, across the country, you are guaranteed a match. Based on the stats, it is nearly impossible not to match - short of showing up naked at the interviews.  But if you are applying to Derm/Plastics/Emerg, etc, you better do a very realistic appraisal of yourself: do you have someone to be your champion on the inside? No amount of studying, elective time, volunteer call hours, and publications will make up for this. If you bust your ass, maybe you can make it to the interview. But from those 30 they are interviewing for the 1 spot, they will pick the one they like in their gut over the forgettable contender, no matter if the latter can clinically perform at a level of an R2. 
    Which brings me to my last point, if you are an MSI1/MSI2/MSI3 reading this, find a back-up and learn to LOVE it. Better yet, stop calling it back-up. It is your parallel plan. How on earth do people do 4 years of med-school, and decided at the end of it, they rather risk going unmatched than do something like FM or IM? It is all a matter of finding a charismatic mentor in any field to convince you that at the end, the work becomes the same crap - the impact and meaning is what you bring into it, not the speciality. It is idiotic for a urology gunner to think 10 years from now, doing their billionth DRE in a row of their 70th patient of the day is somehow more glamorous than consulting a mother who just got the news that they son has autism. It is all medicine.
  24. Like
    Borborygmi reacted to NLengr in Keeping busy until Match day   
    I spent time this morning doing USMLE psych questions (LMCC prep) with the med student on my service right now while we waited for my cases to start (I'm surgical staff at a community hospital). I guess thats how she is passing her time. 
     
    I told her I'll give her a poor eval if she shows up on match day. 
  25. Like
    Borborygmi got a reaction from MDhopetobe in apply to med in your thirties?   
    In at 35 after going back for additional undergrad for a few years before being accepted. I've often reflected on whether I would do the whole thing again. It was a very, very difficult period of time. It was also a realistic possibility that I would never gain acceptance--getting into med school in Canada is quite difficult. I'm not sure I would undertake the process again, but I'm very happy to be in medicine. I love it just about every day. It does require a lot of sacrifice and the expectations are pretty unrealistic. Especially if you have a family already. I would just say, know what you're getting yourself into before taking the leap. 
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