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Found 18 results

  1. Hi there, So I am currently a high school student in Grade 11, and am considering to go into the medical stream. My first semester grade 11 marks, in my opinion, are good, but are not necessarily that stellar (currently averaging at 89). During second semester, I'm doing better with an anticipated average of around 93 (mostly business courses, hardest course is functions). Considering the fact that medical school heavily weigh GPA as well as MCAT, I was just wondering if this program is a "GPA killer"? From what I know, in this program, the college courses taken at Centennial College count as university credits and are presumably easy and high-school like in nature. As a result, I assume these are an easy way to bring up your GPA. However, the UofT courses (the mandatory life science ones) are considered hard and are specifically calibrated to bring the averages down if too high (bell curve). Is that true? One of the main factors that contribute to this program to be first on my list of choices is the fact that in addition to getting a degree, you also get a useful diploma which enables you to get a highly demanded job, as a paramedic. Other programs that I am considering are either a bio program at either Ryerson or Brock (to simply get a higher GPA) as well as Life Science at McMaster. With these programs, however, the potential possibility of not making it into medical school can be devastating. However, if the correct courses are taken, there is a chance to venture my way into dentistry or podiatry. Ultimately, what do you think would be the best course of action for me?
  2. Hi guys, I just finished my first year of university and am now a second year student! Do you guys have any suggestions for extracurricular activities at the University of Waterloo? I was involved with the pre-vet club last year. Thanks
  3. Hi guys, I am a second year health studies student at the University of Waterloo. For my fall term I am taking three health courses (HLTH 201, HLTH 202, HLTH 204) and KIN 217, which are required. I took MATH 127 (calculus 1 for the sciences) as my elective. Although I consider myself to be good at math, do you think this is a good choice for an elective. I am not able to take CHEM 123, a prerequisite for organic chemistry 1 in the fall term because it is only offered online. Are there any other courses that you would recommend I take? Thanks
  4. Hey guys, So this may be a silly question, but if I apply to medical school in fourth year (my undergraduate degree is five years) then does that mean that I won't be able to finish my undergraduate degree as I will be starting medical school in the upcoming year? Also, considering my degree is five years long, when do you suggest that I apply to medical school (I will be beginning my second year in the fall). Thanks
  5. I am a First Year at a Canadian University and I am just wondering if changing my degree 2 times in this year will affect my application? I believe that my first year in university is somehow experimental where I am still in the process of deciding what I really want to do. Please, your insight about this will be greatly appreciated. Thank you
  6. Greetings! Each year, the Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) Interest Group at Schulich holds an Ultrasound Symposium for medical students to learn about the use of ultrasound in a clinical setting. However - this post isn't for medical students! No, this post is for pre-med students. In past years, we’ve been fortunate to have pre-med students help us out at the Ultrasound Symposium as patient models. This is exactly what it sounds like – volunteers who act as patients, allowing medical students to learn the basics of point-of-care ultrasound by scanning on a real person. They will be taught by physicians and residents. We’re asking for any students who will be in the London area on Saturday, August 19th, 2017 to consider helping us out. We'd be more than happy to answer questions volunteers may have about medical school in general, and/or ultrasound's role in medicine. Please find details and FAQ below! Details What: Volunteer Patient Model for ultrasound scanning at the Western Student Ultrasound Symposium When: Saturday, August 19th, 2017 [approximately 8:00am~6:00 pm, with lunch and breaks included] Where: CSTAR, at University Hospital in London, Ontario, Canada How: Sign-up here! https://goo.gl/forms/yfg8OnsTRytRl1AN2 FAQ What does being a patient model involve? Mostly, it involves lying down and following a few simple instructions given by the physicians teaching the sessions, such as rolling on one side or holding a breath. That's about it! We handle all the set-up, clean-up, and organization of the Symposium, so all the traditional volunteer work is taken care of - we just need your help to teach medical students about ultrasound. What’s in this for me? The inner satisfaction of helping others learn valuable skills! Ok, ok, besides that. You’ll be spending time with physicians, residents, and medical students in a professional setting, learning about an area of medicine – point-of-care ultrasound – that is growing in scope and importance. Being a patient model is one of the best ways to learn the ins and outs of ultrasound. More importantly, if you'd like, during breaks, we can offer patient models instructions in ultrasound scanning, as well as some hands-on scanning time with the machine. We’ll also feed you lunch and give you a fancy certificate for participating! Can I use this on my CV or in my application for medical/professional schools? Of course! It’s only a one-day event, but we do hope it will be a valuable experience to mention on your application and/or in your interviews. We are also more than willing to serve as a verifier for applications to medical school or other professional schools that require one. Do I have to expose any body parts that I don’t want to? Absolutely not! This is a PG event – and we intend to keep it that way. Most of the scans are done on the abdomen, so the stomach is exposed and we do ask that all patient models be comfortable with at least that. We do hold a Cardiac workshop as part of the symposium that involves some scanning around the chest, which we try to get more male models to do, though many female models have participated in the past without difficulty. We always give patient models final say – we try to make every scan as comfortable as possible, as we would have for real patients, but all models have the right to refuse to participate in a scan without consequence. Loose-fitting clothing - namely shorts and a T-shirt, plus a sports bra for women - is highly recommended to provide sufficient exposure for those scanning while maintaining privacy for patient models. We also provide gowns, sheets, and other coverings so that every effort is made to only expose areas necessary for the scan. Is this really a worthwhile experience? Having been involved with the Ultrasound Symposium firsthand as well as volunteering, it is certainly a unique opportunity to see a very practical part of medicine, one which is still being developed and refined. You'll get an inside look at medical education at the student level. Plus, you get to see CSTAR, which is a phenomenal start-of-the-art training centre! I have more questions. Who do I talk to? Please feel free to ask a question in the thread below! In addition, our sign-up sheet (see FAQ) also has a field for questions. Ok, I’m interested! Where do I sign-up? Sign-ups can be made here. Please make sure your e-mail is correct – someone from Point-of-care Ultrasound Interest Group will be in touch with you after signing up to provide further details and verify participation. We hope to see you there! #This post was adapted from an original forum post by "ralk"
  7. Hey guys, I am currently an undergraduate student, however, I just have some questions about the Caribbean Medical School. Although I will be applying to Canadian medical schools and possibly American medical schools, I feel it is beneficial to also know about the Caribbean Medical School program. Have any of you attended the program and if so what are your thoughts on it? How does it compare to Canadian or American medical schools? Thanks!
  8. Hey guys, Hope everything's going well! I'm wondering if someone who got accepted into medical school can post a list of what extracurriculars he/she did during each year of undergrad. Thanks
  9. Bonjour, Alors voila j'ai une cote R assez faible de 29 mais j'envisage peut importe le moyen de rentrer en médecine, je ne me vois absolument pas faire quelque chose d'autre. Je suis au courant de mes options qui sont soit d'augmenter ma cote R au cégep, ou faire un bac à l'université. Je suis maintenant à ma 3ème session et il me reste 12 cours pour obtenir mon diplôme, cependant j'aimerais ça annuler 2 cours cette session et la session prochaine pour rajouter une 5ème session de 4 cours, afin de mieux me concentrer pour remonter ma cote R. Cependant j'ai appris que McGill et l'UdeM ont des exigences pour que le DEC soit obtenu en 2 ans, sauf si bien sûr une raison oblige de le tarder (sports-études,maladie,...). Est-ce vrai que l'UdeM n'accepte pas un DEC qui a pris plus que 2 ans à completer? Que faire? Suis-je mieux de poursuivre un BAC ou de faire mon DEC en 2 ans et demie et postuler à une autre université? Est-ce plus facile d'être accepter avec un BAC ou durant celui-ci (les notes au BAC influence-t-il grandement la cote R)? Merci tout le monde. Des conseils de personne ayant été accepter aussi sont grandement apprécié, surtout si vous aussi vous deviez augmenter votre cote R.
  10. Greetings! Each year, the Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) Interest Group at Schulich holds an Ultrasound Symposium for medical students to learn about the use of ultrasound in a clinical setting. However - this post isn't for medical students! No, this post is for pre-med students. Each year, we’ve been fortunate to have pre-med students help us out at the Ultrasound Symposium as patient models. This is exactly what it sounds like – volunteers who act as patients, allowing medical students to learn the basics of point-of-care ultrasound by scanning on a real person. They will be taught by physicians and residents. We’re asking for any students who will be in the London area on Saturday, August 20th, 2016 to consider helping us out. We'd be more than happy to answer questions volunteers may have about medical school in general, and/or ultrasound's role in medicine. Please find details and FAQ below! Details What: Volunteer patient model for ultrasound scanning at the Western Student Ultrasound Symposium When: Saturday, August 20th, 2016 [approximately 8:30am~4:00 pm, with lunch and breaks included] Where: CSTAR, at University Hospital in London, Ontario, Canada How: Sign-up here! http://goo.gl/forms/J0Tmd7o36wzCgR7G3 FAQ So, what does being a patient model involve? Mostly, it involves lying down and following a few simple instructions given by the physicians teaching the sessions, such as rolling on one side or holding a breath. That's about it! We handle all the set-up, clean-up, and organization of the Symposium, so all the traditional volunteer work is taken care of - we just need your help to teach medical students about ultrasound. What’s in this for me? The inner satisfaction of helping others learn valuable skills! Ok, ok, besides that. You’ll be spending time with physicians, residents, and medical students in a professional setting, learning about an area of medicine – point-of-care ultrasound – that is growing in scope and importance. Being a patient model is one of the best ways to learn the ins and outs of ultrasound. More importantly, if you'd like, during breaks, we can offer patient models instructions in ultrasound scanning, as well as some hands-on scanning time with the machine. We’ll also feed you lunch and give you a fancy certificate for participating! On a bit of a side-note, I'd also be happy to discuss potential career paths or to go over medical school applications with undergraduate students. After all, I've been there too! Can I use this on my CV or in my application for medical/professional schools? Of course! It’s only a one-day event, but we do hope it will be a valuable experience to mention on your application and/or in your interviews. I am also more than willing to serve as a verifier for applications to medical school or other professional schools that require one. Do I have to expose any body parts that I don’t want to? Absolutely not! This is a PG event – and we intend to keep it that way. Most of the scans are done on the abdomen, so the stomach is exposed and we do ask that all patient models be comfortable with at least that. We do hold a Cardiac workshop as part of the symposium that involves some scanning around the chest, which we try to get more male models to do, though many female models have participated in the past without difficulty. We always give patient models final say – we try to make every scan as comfortable as possible, as we would have for real patients, but all models have the right to refuse to participate in a scan without consequence. Loose-fitting clothing - namely shorts and a T-shirt, plus a sports bra for women - is highly recommended to provide sufficient exposure for those scanning while maintaining privacy for patient models. We also provide gowns, sheets, and other coverings so that every effort is made to only expose areas necessary for the scan. Is this really a worthwhile experience? Having been involved with the Ultrasound Symposium for a few years, I found it to be a unique opportunity to see a very practical part of medicine, one which is still being developed and refined. You'll get an inside look at medical education at the student level. Plus, you get to see CSTAR, which is a phenomenal start-of-the-art training centre! I have more questions. Who do I talk to? Please feel free to ask a question in the thread below! In addition, our sign-up sheet (see next FAQ) also has a field for questions. Ok, I’m interested! Where do I sign-up? Sign-ups can be made here. Please make sure your e-mail is correct – someone from Point-of-care Ultrasound Interest Group will be in touch with you after signing up to provide further details and verify participation. We hope to see you there! #This post was adapted from an original forum post by "ralk", credit where credit is due.
  11. Hi guys, I don't know what I should do this summer so I'm looking for a little bit of guidance. Stats: -going into 5th year -did MCAT last summer while working (11/10/9) and a worse mcat before that with a summer off - gpa is sitting right now ~3.45. Should be near ~3.5 next year graduation (best/last two year gpa will be ~3.9, but this will only make me competitive for application after I graduate so I'd need a year off) - 1 year research experience (no reference though), 3 years other research experience (well known study, but mostly an administrative position) - 2-3 really strong academic references - average volunteering - potential thesis pub but not taking that into account cause nothing is set in stone Basically, I've been offered two full-time research positions this summer and I've narrowed it down to one. This would be a good reference and it would help me expand into a research role. The work is policy related and seems kind of interesting. No mention of any publication potential but eh, I'm satisfied with the offer. Do I take 2.5 months off to study and do my mcat (and then work full time at current job), or do I accept the new jobs full time offer? I've done mcat with work before and I found it hard to focus. This is most likely my last attempt at writing and I want to give it my all. I think I'm capable of a pretty good score and I've gotten into a good academic mindset this year (mental health/family issues made grades suffer first few years of ugrad). I just feel guilty not taking the research position since my family is in the midst of a divorce and while finances aren't dire, I feel bad not being able to contribute a whole lot. I also have a long distance relationship and would like a week or two of freedom to travel. Basically, I'd like to get into some sort of program right after my fifth year. I've taken my LSAT and will be applying to law, will be looking into grad school, and I'd love to be a good candidate for med school. I think doing well on my mcat gives me a better chance than a new reference. However, I'm afraid that I won't have any chance of getting into medical school until after my graduation so that all of my fifth year marks can be taken into consideration. I understand this, but I'm not sure if I'm happy about a year off after I graduate. I feel as if I'm delaying everything. Plus, if I do wait a year with the intention of getting into med and then don't get it, I'll regret just not going into grad school/law school right way. Should I do a course-based masters during that year off? Again, not financially sound and I don't know how much of an advantage it gives me. Studying for my MCAT while doing this is also not a great option. Going abroad to study is not feasible given my financial situation. I may give cheaper US MD/DO schools a shot this round but I feel as if I'll be late in the process with a late mcat and that it'll be a waste of application money. I'm really scatter-brained. Does anyone even have a career before 30? Even law school is so long. Why did I not go abroad immediately I don't care much about living in Canada. tl;dr: work this summer or take mcat? do fifth year and wait year(s) and then apply until I get in, or go into another program (i.e. law) and stick to that? DO I PURSUE MEDICINE AT ALL? Thanks for parsing through this.
  12. Hello I am a freshman studying at a liberal arts school in Michigan that is highly reputable. I am a pre-med and biochemistry major. I plan on applying to med school in Canada. I have recently been told that converting Gpa using the OMSAS has led to some trouble for American undergrads. Since my school does not use the A+. My Gpa would be hurt significantly when applying to Canadian med school. Has anyone encountered this problem? What did you do? I need to figure this out soon incase I have to transfer to a Canadian school. I would be very appreciative of any help and direction I could receive on this problem.
  13. **This event is intended for future applicants who consider themselves 'non-traditional applicants'. Current applicants who consider themselves 'non-traditional' are welcome to attend as well. We are pleased to announce the UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium 2014! This MD student run event sponsored by the Faculty of Medicine. The UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium is an annual event designed to educate future applicants about medical school. The event is geared toward those individuals who may consider themselves ‘non-traditional’ applicants. Reasons for considering oneself non-traditional include a non-science background, a difficult family or financial background, recent immigration to Canada, aboriginal ancestry, parenthood and career changes. The event is run by current UBC medical students with the support of the UBC faculty of medicine. The event will take place Sunday, November 16th 2014 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM in Vancouver, Victoria, Prince George and Kelowna. Traditional applicants - please be on the lookout for future events more geared towards your needs! Sunday, November 16th, 2014 –10:00 am to 4:30 pm (Lunch will be provided.) Vancouver: Medical Student Alumni Centre (2750 Heather St) Victoria: University of Victoria Medical Sciences Building (3800 Finnerty Rd), Room 131 Prince George: Donald Rix Northern Health Sciences Centre (3333 University Way), Room 9-370 Kelowna: Kelowna General Hospital (2268 Pandosy St), Room 228 Please RSVP by November 7th, 2014 with your name, site you will attend, and any dietary restrictions. e-mail: premed.diversity@gmail.com Pre-med Poster 2014 - web.pdf
  14. Registration is now open for the University of Colorado School of Medicine's three 2015 Pre-Med Emergency & Wilderness Medicine Program sessions. The Program includes Emergency Department shadowing with medical school faculty, EMS ride-alongs, labs, lectures from about 20 different faculty and many different specialties, a career panel, talks from the Admissions Office, CPR certification, optional Wilderness First Responder certification, and a camp-based experience. Sessions will be run in January, May-June, and August. The program is aimed at junior and senior level pre-med (or other health studies) students, but it is open to any and all undergraduate students and recent graduates. Three need-based scholarships--covering 100% of the University's fee--will be awarded for each of the three sessions. More information about the nearly two week program, held at our medical school in Denver and at a nearby Rocky Mountain summer camp and backcountry, can be found at our web site athttp://www.coloradowm.org/undergraduate_courses.html. Please contact Dr. Todd Miner at todd.miner@ucdenver.edu with questions.
  15. We are pleased to announce the UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium 2014! This MD student run event sponsored by the Faculty of Medicine. The UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium is an annual event designed to educate future applicants about medical school. The event is geared toward those individuals who may consider themselves ‘non-traditional’ applicants. Reasons for considering oneself non-traditional include a non-science background, a difficult family or financial background, recent immigration to Canada, aboriginal ancestry, parenthood and career changes. The event is run by current UBC medical students with the support of the UBC faculty of medicine. The event will take place Sunday, November 16th 2014 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM in Vancouver, Victoria, Prince George and Kelowna. Traditional applicants - please be on the lookout for future events more geared towards your needs! Sunday, November 16th, 2014 –10:00 am to 4:30 pm (Lunch will be provided.) Vancouver: Medical Student Alumni Centre (2750 Heather St) Victoria: University of Victoria Medical Sciences Building (3800 Finnerty Rd), Room 131 Prince George: Donald Rix Northern Health Sciences Centre (3333 University Way), Room 9-370 Kelowna: Kelowna General Hospital (2268 Pandosy St), Room 228 Please RSVP by November 7th, 2014 with your name, site you will attend, and any dietary restrictions. e-mail: premed.diversity@gmail.com Pre-med Poster 2014 - web.pdf
  16. We are pleased to announce the UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium 2014! This MD student run event sponsored by the Faculty of Medicine. The UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium is an annual event designed to educate future applicants about medical school. The event is geared toward those individuals who may consider themselves ‘non-traditional’ applicants. Reasons for considering oneself non-traditional include a non-science background, a difficult family or financial background, recent immigration to Canada, aboriginal ancestry, parenthood and career changes. The event is run by current UBC medical students with the support of the UBC faculty of medicine. The event will take place Sunday, November 16th 2014 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM in Vancouver, Victoria, Prince George and Kelowna. Traditional applicants - please be on the lookout for future events more geared towards your needs! Sunday, November 16th, 2014 –10:00 am to 4:30 pm (Lunch will be provided.) Vancouver: Medical Student Alumni Centre (2750 Heather St) Victoria: University of Victoria Medical Sciences Building (3800 Finnerty Rd), Room 131 Prince George: Donald Rix Northern Health Sciences Centre (3333 University Way), Room 9-370 Kelowna: Kelowna General Hospital (2268 Pandosy St), Room 228 Please RSVP by November 7th, 2014 with your name, site you will attend, and any dietary restrictions. e-mail: premed.diversity@gmail.com Pre-med Poster 2014 - web.pdf
  17. We are pleased to announce the UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium 2014! This MD student run event sponsored by the Faculty of Medicine. The UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium is an annual event designed to educate future applicants about medical school. The event is geared toward those individuals who may consider themselves ‘non-traditional’ applicants. Reasons for considering oneself non-traditional include a non-science background, a difficult family or financial background, recent immigration to Canada, aboriginal ancestry, parenthood and career changes. The event is run by current UBC medical students with the support of the UBC faculty of medicine. The event will take place Sunday, November 16th 2014 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM in Vancouver, Victoria, Prince George and Kelowna. Traditional applicants - please be on the lookout for future events more geared towards your needs! Sunday, November 16th, 2014 –10:00 am to 4:30 pm (Lunch will be provided.) Vancouver: Medical Student Alumni Centre (2750 Heather St) Victoria: University of Victoria Medical Sciences Building (3800 Finnerty Rd), Room 131 Prince George: Donald Rix Northern Health Sciences Centre (3333 University Way), Room 9-370 Kelowna: Kelowna General Hospital (2268 Pandosy St), Room 228 Please RSVP by November 7th, 2014 with your name, site you will attend, and any dietary restrictions. e-mail: premed.diversity@gmail.com
  18. We are pleased to announce the UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium 2014! This MD student run event sponsored by the Faculty of Medicine. The UBC Pre-Med Diversity Symposium is an annual event designed to educate future applicants about medical school. The event is geared toward those individuals who may consider themselves ‘non-traditional’ applicants. Reasons for considering oneself non-traditional include a non-science background, a difficult family or financial background, recent immigration to Canada, aboriginal ancestry, parenthood and career changes. The event is run by current UBC medical students with the support of the UBC faculty of medicine. The event will take place Sunday, November 16th 2014 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM in Vancouver, Victoria, Prince George and Kelowna. Traditional applicants - please be on the lookout for future events more geared towards your needs! Sunday, November 16th, 2014 –10:00 am to 4:30 pm (Lunch will be provided.) Vancouver: Medical Student Alumni Centre (2750 Heather St) Victoria: University of Victoria Medical Sciences Building (3800 Finnerty Rd), Room 131 Prince George: Donald Rix Northern Health Sciences Centre (3333 University Way), Room 9-370 Kelowna: Kelowna General Hospital (2268 Pandosy St), Room 228 Please RSVP by November 7th, 2014 with your name, site you will attend, and any dietary restrictions. e-mail: premed.diversity@gmail.com Pre-med Poster 2014 - web.pdf
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