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Found 52 results

  1. Hey guys! I was just wondering if any previous or current students or those who generally know a lot about the two universities could give me some pros and cons of the program, student life, placements etc.? Thanks
  2. So, I did my undergrad in Kinesiology at Queen's, and took all of my prerequisites for Queens PT (I.e. Anatomy, Psych, Stats, Physiology) in my first 1-2 years. However, I didn't do so well, and so I will be re-taking all of my prerequisites, except at Athabasca U since I no longer live in Kingston. Is this allowed/standard practice? Can I simply take the Athabasca equivalents for the Queen's prerequisites (As listed on the Queen's site) and choose to submit my prerequisites from the Athabasca courses instead of my old Queen's courses? If it makes a difference, the Queen's courses will not be a part of my sGPA, as they were taken early on in my undergrad. Thank you to anyone who has either done this or knows enough to chime in!
  3. Hi everyone, I apologize in advance, because I recognize that this question has been asked before. I have searched through all of Premed101 and read those threads carefully. However, I would still love some additional perspectives, specifically from graduates (or those in clerkship) in either McMaster Medicine or Queen's Medicine (although I welcome other perspectives on this as well). Coming from a mainly PBL-based background, I recognize that I have the potential to thrive at Mac, but I also recognize that PBL isn't always as effective. As a result, Queen's blend between PBL and didactic learning appeals to me. How do grads/clerks of either program feel that the curriculum is structured at their respective schools? I also recognize that McMaster is condensed into three years and their clerkship schedule can be a bit messy, with some students starting on electives and not being able to experience vital electives until post-CaRMS. I have heard that Queen's clerks have much greater flexibility with how their clerkship blocks and electives are structured. Do graduates/clerks from Mac feel they were disadvantaged because of the clerkship lottery and/or have they witnessed other peers being disadvantaged? Conversely, how do Queen's grads/clerks find their clerkship experience is structured/are they satisfied with it? I also want to ensure that I gain the maximum exposure possible to all different fields within medicine, as I am not yet certain what exactly I would like to do. With that being said, how satisfied are those at Mac and Queen's with the opportunities for observerships/electives at their respective schools? Are there ample opportunities to gain exposure to everything at both or would I be better off selecting one school over the other because of a difference in opportunities? With that, if I cannot find a specific elective at my school, is it difficult/harder to arrange a visiting elective at another school? Lastly, how has your overall experience at your respective school been? Have you enjoyed your time there? Have there been things you really liked? Have you had any qualms or disgruntlements with the program? I realize that those are a lot of questions and that different individuals' answers will vary. Regardless, thank you so much for taking the time to read this and possibly reply. I could really benefit from some additional perspectives.
  4. Hi, I was accepted to several undergraduate life science/medical science programs, but I am unsure about where I should go. If anyone has attended the following programs listed below, could you tell me about your experience? (e.g. quality of education, competition, bell curve, academic or extracurricular opportunites, atmosphere of the university/campus, etc.) For me, I feel like there are several pros/cons for each program/university, and I just don't know where I should go. McGill Life Sciences, Western Medical Sciences, uOttawa Biomedical Science, Queen's Science, Waterloo Biomedical Sciences, McMaster Life Science, McMaster Integrated Science. Thanks!
  5. Hi Everyone, I'm a 1st year OT student at Queens, and I will be looking for 3 people to join my house beginning in September. Its a two unit, and I live in the basement unit with another 1st year OT, but the upstairs I will be looking for 3 people. I figured I would create a platform where people searching for housing can also look for a roommate, as I think it would be great to have a house of OT/PT students. Once you get your acceptances there will be a facebook group created, and that also works as one excellent platform, so I highly recommend you join that as well. If you have any housing questions, or general questions about the OT program at Queens shoot me a message, I'd be happy to help Looking forward to meeting the class of 2020! Kind regards, Vanessa
  6. Does anyone know when we should expect to hear back from Queens PT for whether or not we got accepted?
  7. Hi All! I am a current Medical Student at the University of Toronto's medical school. I received 3 Canadian and 2 US MD acceptances in 2017. I would like to promote the interview prep company that helped me get over the hump: Medvisors. I was a very poor interviewer and was very nervous about the process but their practice and personalized packages made a huge difference for me. I am now a consultant for them and I help other students with interview preparation. Their most unique and popular (and cost effective) service is the VIRTUAL MMI CIRCUIT that they offer... you have 6 stations with 6 different graders and they give you a personalized feedback form at the end too. As far as I know, no one else offers that kind of seamless online setup where you switch rooms etc. Free prep is also great but sometimes the interviewees are more focused on their own prep rather than giving quality feedback. Also, Medvisors consultants are experts and have interviewed at your school of choice! Visit medvisors.org for more!
  8. Hello! This is an update to a previous post from last year's CaRMS match. I have provided the same information as last year, while including some information from our experience implementing it this last year. As many of you may know, Queen's implemented Competence By Design (CBD - the Canadian CBME curriculum) on an accelerated timeline. All first year residents in July 2017, in all Queen’s programs, started on the CBD curriculum. Residents will continue on that program in 2018. By way of introduction, I am a member of the Resident Subcommittee on Competency Based Medical Education at Queen's. Part of our mandate is to disseminate information about the CBD program being implemented this upcoming year to final year medical students applying for residency this year. This information will also apply to those applying for Anesthesia and ENT nationally, as Competence By Design is being introduced in those specialties across Canada. Many of you have already or will soon see an e-mail from the departments you are applying to with similar information. This post will hopefully answer any questions you may have about CBME at Queen's. Before I start - if this e-mail and the links at the end don't answer your questions, you can e-mail cbme@queensu.ca to reach the CBME Resident subcommittee. I will monitor this post, as well, to hopefully clarify any misconceptions in the discussion. Furthermore, there will be many opportunities to ask questions on your interview day and throughout the application process. *NOTE*: The following information is primarily for Royal College residency programs (ie. excluding Family Medicine), since Family Medicine transitioned to the triple C curriculum several years ago. 1. What is CBME? The bottom line: Residency will not change dramatically. The perks: Incoming residents will have multiple tools available to them to enhance their residency education. CBME shifts the focus of residency training from short-term, rotation based objectives, to long-term residency outcome objectives (ie. what does this physician need to know and be equipped with for independent practice?). The result is clearly outlined educational objectives with provision of more frequent assessment and feedback with tailored, actionable steps towards achieving your goal, or ‘competence’. The Royal College has mandated that all Canadian programs are structured under the Competence by Design (CBD – the Canadian CBME curriculum) curriculum by 2022, on a rolling timeline dependent upon the specialty. This is a hybrid model of CBME within a time-based structure so RESIDENCY WILL NOT BE SHORTENED. At least not in this upcoming year – there is a potential for this in the future. Queen's is implementing CBD on an accelerated timeline. All first year residents in July 2017, in all Queen’s programs, will be under CBD. Rather than the traditional PGY 1-5, residency under CBD is broken down into four stages: Stage 1: "Transition to Discipline" Stage 2: "Foundations of Discipline" Stage 3: "Core of Discipline" Stage 4: "Transition to Practice". 2) What are EPAs and Milestones? Milestones are observable markers of a learner’s ability along a developmental continuum. You can think of them like "steps across a pond". Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) are discrete, observable, clinical tasks that a supervisor may delegate to a resident who has demonstrated sufficient competence. A specialty’s EPAs are decided upon, by consensus, at the national level. For example, all anesthesia residency programs across Canada will use the same EPAs in tailoring their training structure and assessments. EPAs not only capture clinical knowledge and procedural competence, but also the intrinsic CanMEDS roles, such as advocate, collaborator, etc. EPAs incorporate a variety of milestones in a manner that allows learners to easily track their progress through residency. An example of an EPA from the Royal College in Medical Oncology: EPA: - Initial Care for urgent and emergent oncologic situations Milestones within that: - Recognize urgent and emergent oncologic issues, including but not limited to, pain crisis, febrile neutropenia, uncontrolled diarrhea, hypocalcemia, epidural cord compression and malignant bowel obstruction - Select and administer appropriate interventions for urgent and emergent oncologic issues - Identify the limits of their own expertise and appropriately seek assistance and supervision 3) Will Residency Be Shorter or Longer? No - see above. Although, there is a possibility for more elective time for residents who are progress through the stages at an accelerated rate. 4) Will I still have 4-week rotations in residency? Yes. The only difference is that your off-service rotation EPAs will make the experience more tailored to your specialty. 5) What about current residents? Current residents are going to benefit from the increased feedback and assessment in a similar way to the incoming residents, they just won't be officially under the CBD curriculum. 6) How is this going to change my job prospects after I'm done? It certainly won’t affect you in a negative way. If anything, the residency experience under the CBD curriculum will offer a unique experience in resident driven learning and assessment. This should have a positive effect on your ability to self-assess and continuing professional development – positive features of a job applicant. 7) After one year, how have things gone so far (information paraphrased from current CBME residents)? Overall, CBD has been implemented with success. Residents enjoy the more frequent, varied and high-quality assessment, as well as the earlier detection if certain skills are not being developed. Residents in most specialties note that most staff have been very enthusiastic about the change, and that there is an atmosphere that allows for open and receptive communication regarding residents' experiences with CBME Non-CBME residents in upper years have also enjoyed the increased opportunities to provide education. Surgical residents have noticed an increased focus on residency education. As with any transition, there have been some struggles. The time constraints of maintaining an OR schedule and ward rounds have made assessments during working hours difficult for some surgical residents. This has been mitigated by developing creative solutions, including retroactive assessments. Other challenges include technical problems that our dedicated information technology support team continues to improve upon as they arise. Here is the CBME e-mail for more questions: cbme@queensu.ca Thanks for reading. Once again, if this does not answer all of your questions, please feel free to e-mail the above address, e-mail the specific program you are applying to or post on here to get more information. Best wishes and GOOD LUCK on your upcoming match!
  9. Hello, Has anyone had any experience in the Queen's Health Science program as their undergraduate? If so how do you like it? I was considering this program for a second undergraduate.
  10. I've applied to Queen's this admissions cycle and just received my MCAT scores. I was hoping to get some thoughts on possible chances based on past experiences ... honesty or inspiration (lol) appreciated. In province 2nd Year MSc research based 3.85 wGPA ECs: well rounded, some long term and some short term, filled all 48 spots with only meaningful stuff so thats good I think (?) they def show who I am but who knows with med, strong references MCAT: My literal nightmare (as for many people)... I have written it 4x (1 old, 3 new) today: 126/124/127/126 (low due to balancing lab and only 2 months to study) previous: 129/124/128/126 (507 total, my highest score so far) 128/123/127/127 8/8/11 (phys/verbal/bio) Will def be writing again after I finish my MSc and hopefully that will help. Wont give up or anything... but given Queens way of looking at MCAT that is speculated... Im wondering if anyone in a similar situation to me has received an interview? Also does anyone know if Queens look at only your highest MCAT for specific section cut offs... or they look at all the MCATs you've written and take the highest mark for individual sections youve ever gotten from any of the rewrites? Gracias!
  11. Just wanted some input on my chances of getting into Queens, Toronto, Western and McMaster. I've had a hard time trying to gauge my GPA as I have gone to two different schools over my last 2 years, and both of them have different ways of calculating GPA, and one of them doesn't include a grade % in their transcripts, only letter grades. Here is a table of my last 20 classes with the suspected GPA correlating with the letter grade. School #1 A 3.9 A 3.9 B- 2.7 A- 3.7 A- 3.7 A- 3.7 B+ 3.3 A 3.9 B 3.0 A 3.9 B 3.0 A 3.9 GPA at school #1 = 3.55 School #2 92% A+ 4.0 72% B 3.0 79% B+ 3.3 92% A+ 4.0 91% A+ 4.0 93% A+ 4.0 76% B+ 3.3 81% A- 3.7 84.3% total =3.66 Average % at school #2 – 84.3% Total average GPA of the 2 schools using letter grades = 3.6 using whatsmygpa One question I have is using school #2 for calculating my GPA, I have an 84% which correlates to 3.66 using whatsmygpa, but when looking at ORPAS table, grade percentage of 84+ is >3.7gpa. Are there any other ways to determine what my GPA is over my last 20 courses? If I did add everything correctly, and my GPA is 3.6, are there any schools that would actually consider me? Thanks,
  12. Hi guys, Congrats to everyone who got accepted into PT programs this year. I have a question for people who are accepted to UBC, QUEENS, WESTERN, and University of Saskatchewan. What was the GPA cut-off this year? Also, if you feel comfortable are you able to tell me the GPA you were accepted with into these programs? How many hours did you volunteer and what made your application stand out? I graduated with a BA (history major) two years ago, and decided to work in the field I initially thought was for me. And even now, I enjoy my job but it’s not something I’m extremely passionate about. I always wanted to pursue physiotherapy because I used to volunteer at a senior’s home in the rehab department alongside some physiotherapists. I enjoyed it so much and thought about switching my majors in the last year of my undergrad but didn’t go through with it since I was almost done my undergrad, and looking at the admissions requirements for MPT, I was worried that it would take me so much longer to become a PT. After working for two years at a comfortable job, I still can’t get the idea of wanting to pursue PT out of my head. So I decided to follow my passion and at least TRY, otherwise, I will always regret it. I’ve already completed the anatomy and physiology prereqs, and working through the rest of the prereqs this year. I’m hoping to apply for next year’s program at UBC, QUEENS, WESTERN and University of Saskatchewan. I’m a 70 -75% average student (undergrad) and trying to get my GPA high by taking some electives currently. It’s a little disheartening when everyone keeps telling me that 80% will not be enough. I want this so bad and I’m trying my best to get my GPA high enough to be at least considered. I have LOTS of experience working with people. I have over 100 hours volunteering with kids (coaching, and working with cognitively impaired children), and about 50 hours working with seniors in the rehab department. I’m volunteering in a rehab clinic right now and with a non-profit disability society. Any advice or recommendation will be greatly appreciated. Thanks, B
  13. I want to apply to MD schools but i've had an abysmal first 2 years of college and I'm currently in my winter term of 3rd year GPA 1st year: 1.98 (F, Fsummer, 2D+s, Cs, 2Bs) GPA 2nd year: 2.75 (Cs and Ds, As in 2nd term) GPA 3rd year: 3.9 (?) ive had all As so far and 1 A+ MCAT: 518 (best: OrgChem&CriticalAn, worst: Phys/Math) ECs: Im doing 1st year of research (research component) I worked a part time job (first 2 years) I'm trying to get my book published (nonfiction/social-political, this process costs looots of $$$) I volunteered at hospital 3 years I volunteer with my church, public library, teach english etc in my community I've run a health blog for 5 years now (mostly mental, I make a lil cash from it too here and there) I speak 4 languages outside english fluently (? is this even an ec) I'm almost positive I have to do either a post-bacc or a Master's but even then are my chances too dim? Do I need more ECs? Another Bachelor degree? I have retook some of the courses should I retake all? Reasons for my failure is 2015 was a horrible year for me and my family, but I take full responsibility for not dropping those courses Thank you for your time!
  14. Hey guys, I've got about two weeks to decide where I'll be going for undergrad. My plan is to pursue general science (mayble a major in physics) for premed and then apply to med school. I've received a large scholarship to Queen's, so my options are down to Queen's and UofM. The cost to attend either of them is irrelevant. I'm most concerned about keeping up a high GPA and having opportunities to make myself competitive for medicine. I'm worried that, if I go to a highly selective school like Queen's, I will be overshadowed by the sheer number of high caliber students (based on entering averages). Also, does anyone know if they grade on a bell curve? From my limited research, it seems that a bell curve is quite harmful to GPAs if you're trying to be in the top 10% of the class. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks, Yashi
  15. I wanted to make a list of medical school requirements (what/how many courses you need, what year they look at, any special eligibility to drop grades (e.g. UofT if you take a full courseload, you get to drop your lowest mark during that year), if school looks at your summer GPA. I have a makeshift list so far, but if anybody could add to it that would be great <3 When people starts adding, I'll finish with a nicer looking chart. Just need help with UBC Dalhousie (NOTHING): To be eligible to apply to Dalhousie Medical School, a full course load of five full classes in each of the two most senior years of the baccalaureate degree submitted for assessment is required. This must be the case regardless of the course load required by the program in which you are enrolled. Only fall and winter terms are used for assessment. Summer courses do not count towards GPA or course load requirements. No specific courses are required, but students are encouraged to pursue challenging and diverse topics, and to have a natural progression in their course selection of the degree being completed. McGill: 2 biology, 2 chemistry, 2 physics, 1 organic chemistry McMaster: An overall simple average will be calculated using the grades from all undergraduate degree level courses ever taken (with the exception of credits taken on exchange outside of Canada/USA). Work of different years is treated equally. This average is calculated by the applicant on the OMSAS Academic Record Form and verified on the OMSAS Verification Report which is sent to applicants. McMaster University may also review and revise this average. The marks from supplementary and summer courses will be included in the GPA calculation. Courses for which a "Pass" grade is assigned are counted for credit, but will not be included in the GPA calculation. In order for the GPA to be evaluated, independent grades from a minimum of 5 half-year or 5 full-year courses in total, are required, without which the application will not be considered. Queens: Degree programs or individual courses are not considered a factor in the calculation of GPAs Calculations include grades from all courses included on the transcript, including repeated courses Courses with Pass/Fail grades or transfer credits (including International Baccalaureate, Advance Placement and CEGEP programs) are not included No adjustments are made based on course load or course levels Calgary (NOTHING): The Cumming School of Medicine does not require that students undertake a formal pre-medical program. No specific courses are required for application or acceptance to the MD program. The admissions committee recommends that applicants consider taking as many of the courses listed in the Applicant Manual as their schedules allow, as the content of these courses will be helpful in preparing for the Medical College Admission Test and during the MD program. Whether or not an applicant has taken these courses at the time of application will not be taken into consideration in scoring the academic record. Students should ensure that the courses they choose satisfy the degree requirements of the undergraduate faculty in which they are registered. Manitoba (what?): The College of Medicine welcomes applicants from all provinces and territories. Up to 5% of the class will be selected from this pool. The Admissions Committee defines Out of Province as those who are a citizen or permanent resident of Canada, but are not a permanent resident of Manitoba. Eligibility requirements remain the same for this applicant pool and you are welcome to apply if you meet or exceed the minimum requirements. However, the Admissions Committee discourages individuals from applying who have an AGPA lower than 3.94 and an operative MCAT score lower than 10.75. If you fall into one or both of these categories, you have a low chance of receiving an invitation to interview. You will need the science courses Chemistry 40S and Biology 40S or 40G in preparation for university studies. Many students also take Physics 40S in preparation for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). In addition, you will need Math 40S (pre-calculus or applied) and definitely need English 40S or French 40S. Ottawa (need org chem for an equivalent of 2 full year courses of chem): One full year course (or two semester courses) in General Biology including laboratory session; One full year course (or two semester courses) in Humanities / Social Sciences; The equivalent of two full-year courses (or four semester courses) of the following Chemistry courses: i) General Biochemistry without laboratory session; ii) General Chemistry with laboratory session; iii) Organic Chemistry with laboratory session. A full-time academic year where the equivalent of four (4) full-year courses is taken is accepted and counted in the WGPA calculation only if the missing course/credit is completed either as an additional course within another academic year or as a summer course. Individual courses taken during a summer session are accepted for the credit value in this instance however the mark obtained is not counted in the calculation of the WGPA. Any year with less than four full-year courses will not count as a full-time year of study. A full-time summer semester does not replace a semester of studies within an academic year. AP, IB and transfer credits are not recognized as fulfilment of full time studies requirement. Toronto: two full-course equivalents (FCEs) in life sciences and one FCE in a social science, humanities or language UBC: The fuck? 6 credits in english. How does this work. Is that 3.0 credits in English??? Western: Applicants must meet the minimum GPA in each of the two best undergraduate years with a full course load of 5 full or equivalent courses (30 credit hours) taken between September and April. Each of the two years used for the GPA requirement must have at least 3 full course equivalents whos e published level is at or above the year of study. For example, in your third year of study, 3 of 5 full course equivalents must be at the 3rd year-level or above. Academic transcripts must clearly show that applicants have met this course load/level requirement.
  16. What are your top choices for OT or PT and why? I want to go into OT but the programs seem similar to me in terms of curriculum. Does anyone have any helpful info/links distinguishing the programs from one another and what factors would personally influence your decision to choose one school over another? I've applied to UBC, Queens, Western, UofT, Alberta (all OT), McMaster (OT and PT).
  17. Just got my application confirmation email on the weekend. It states "Our sub-GPA cut-off this year will be approximately 3.68 but is subject to change as we move through the process." I'm not surprised they're finally increasing the cutoff. But I'm kind of concerned about how much higher it will go. Do you think they'll stick with that figure since that's a large increase already?
  18. I have a CARS score of 125 and on overall MCAT 508. My wGPA will be >3.8 and I have great ECs. I'm applying this year, but juts wanted some input from you guys. Maybe there is other ON schools that are better suited for me who don't take CARS so seriously. I know that Queen's process is relatively a mystery (as far as numbers are concerned). Any input would be great. Unfortunately, this was my 2nd MCAT try and so I think this is my true CARS score and can't improve much on it. Thanks.
  19. Kingston- Stunning 1 Bedroom Loft Available April 1 35 Rideau Street, Kingston, ON, Canada Posted on January 26, 2017 as seen on www.MedsHousing.com Listing ID #0012317 Located on the top floor this Appealing 1 bedroom features large bright windows that show a beautiful view of Lake Ontario. Right in the heart of downtown Kingston, located closely to some of Kingston’s major hot spots. Close proximity to Kingston’s Hospitals, as well as convenience to the K Rock Center. Two short blocks to Princess Street and many of Kingston’s popular restaurants. Some of the many apartment features include: • Large Bright Windows equipped with Solar Shades • Rustic Flooring • Exposed Architectural Limestone Features and Reclaimed Brick • Quartz Countertops • Beautiful Stainless Steel High Efficiency • In Suite Laundry • European Walk-in Shower Stalls • Wall mounted 42”-47 “Smart TV’s • High Quality Lighting, Plumbing Fixtures and Faucets • Cast Iron Radiant Heating • Air Conditioning • Parking may be available in a neighboring lot • Additional Storage, Bike Racks and Recycling Rent Includes Heat, Water & Sewer Price : $1,725/mo Contact landlord through MedsHousing.com
  20. Hello! I have a question regarding the specialty focus of MPT programs in Canada. I was told that UBC has a neuro focus while Alberta has a sports focus and Western has an orthopedic focus, is this true? Also, what do Queens and McMaster focus on? Thanks!
  21. Hello, I am finishing my first semester of university in a kinesiology program. I like it, it's okay, but I don't love it like some of my peers are loving their programs and schools. This bothers me because it is so expensive, a lot of effort, time and stress. I know I want to stay in a program like kin, but I have also had nursing bothering me in the back of my mind since applying to schools in grade 12. Some of the things I really like here are: the campus and surrounding areas, the vegetarian-friendly community, my volunteer placement and the content of most of my courses. However, compared to other schools I find this school to be boring & somewhat disorganized. Not many clubs, campus becomes a graveyard on weekends, not a good party scene. I just feel like I am not having a good time and all I do is school work. I don't know if this is me adjusting, or something else, but I just know this university is not as great as I thought it would be, and it is kind of upsetting. I want more out of this experience. Should I look in to other schools/programs? Should I wait another semester or two to see if this is where I want to stay? How do you know if you should transfer/consider transferring? Is it WORTH it to transfer?
  22. Hello, I am planning on applying to PT at UfoT, McMaster, and Queens for Fall 2017, and just want to know what my chances of getting in are. My subGPA (last 10 undergrad classes?) is ~3.9, and cumulative GPA is ~3.7. This is not including my graduate level courses for which my avg GPA for the 3 courses completed is around a 3.7. I'm currently completing a research-intensive master's program (ending Aug 2017) and was awarded a CIHR scholarship for my Master's thesis (which is highly related to PT). I've got a couple conference presentations/publications under my belt, and have worked a few summers in a PT clinic as well as volunteered plenty of hours in the past. My biggest concern is the fact that I got a really crappy grade in Human Physiology (61%) since it was taken in first year.... I did, however, input my exercise physiology grade (kin physiology course, which I did much better in) on the ORPAS application. I'm not sure how this will be accepted, but I figured I would try my luck with that. Any input is appreciated!!
  23. What are the minimum requirements for MCAT scores for each of the schools? I know McMaster requires at least 123 for CARS and U of T requires at least 125 in all 4 sections What about Queens, Western, and Northern Ontario? I've looked every where and I don't see these their minimum requirements.
  24. Hello, I was just wondering if anyone who went to Queen's knows which physiology courses are accepted by UofT? I know that every school accepts 214 but I was wondering if UofT accepts 210 as well? I found through googling that their pharmacy school does but that doesn't mean their dental school does.
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