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mollz

Canada to UK (EU citizen)

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Hi everyone!

Is anyone here studying in the UK from Canada and has experience with graduate entry?

I'm completing a BSc in biomed and a EU citizen and I'm considering going to the UK. 

My GPA is about 8/10 which would be 1st honors (not sure), 2:1 at least. I'm thinking about applying to Oxbridge, maybe Edinburgh and Birmingham. Has anyone had experience with these schools?

I have clinical experience, a decent amount of ECs and starting research, and I don't know what my chances to get in are.

I'm younger than the average student so if I applied to regular programs (with school leavers), I'd be about the same age as them.

I'm a bit lost, should I apply to A100 or A101 programs? Any advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks! :)

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Make sure to go through each website carefully because details change overtime. Eligibility is crucial and it changes depending on the school and the program. I would apply to A101 and A100 programs at places you want to go. You will probably have to write different exams for different schools. These exams include the UKCAT, BMAT and MCAT in some cases. I wouldn't write the MCAT just for the UK, only if you've already written it. 

More importantly, why are you going to the UK? Is it because you can't get into medical school in North America? Keep in mind if you do go to the UK, you will have trouble coming back, only about 50-60% of UK medical grads are able to come back and not in any specialty or location they want. You can stay in the UK if you go, but you should probably research the UK medical system as it isn't as desirable a workplace as Canada. 

 

 

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Thanks for the reply :) That's what I've been doing, I have the French Baccalauréat Scientifique with Highest Honours so that covers pretty much all A-levels requirements.

I don't think that I'd get accepted in America because my OMSAS GPA will be 3.5/3.6 by the end of 3rd year and AMCAS 3.59ish. I'm an international here so it's basically impossible for me to get govt aid or student loans. I'll apply in the US anyway but I don't think that anything will come out of it.

My whole family is not too far from the UK so I don't mind moving there permanently.

What I'm concerned about is that if I apply to A101 programs, I'll be competing against PhD, MSc and people with a lot of experience. Would it be safer to only apply to A100 programs, with the added bonus of already having a BSc?

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23 hours ago, mollz said:

Thanks for the reply :) That's what I've been doing, I have the French Baccalauréat Scientifique with Highest Honours so that covers pretty much all A-levels requirements.

I don't think that I'd get accepted in America because my OMSAS GPA will be 3.5/3.6 by the end of 3rd year and AMCAS 3.59ish. I'm an international here so it's basically impossible for me to get govt aid or student loans. I'll apply in the US anyway but I don't think that anything will come out of it.

My whole family is not too far from the UK so I don't mind moving there permanently.

What I'm concerned about is that if I apply to A101 programs, I'll be competing against PhD, MSc and people with a lot of experience. Would it be safer to only apply to A100 programs, with the added bonus of already having a BSc?

In that case, definitely do medical school in the UK. 

I'm not sure if the A101 programs fall under UCAS or not. In UCAS, you can only apply to 4 medical schools. If they don't fall within UCAS, then definitely apply to them since you don't lose out. If they do, then I would only consider applying to one or two of those programs and apply to a few A100 programs. The A101 programs are supposed to be more competitive than the A100 programs but you shouldn't give up just because of that, otherwise you will never know if you could have gotten in. 

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On 6/8/2018 at 6:48 PM, Edict said:

Make sure to go through each website carefully because details change overtime. Eligibility is crucial and it changes depending on the school and the program. I would apply to A101 and A100 programs at places you want to go. You will probably have to write different exams for different schools. These exams include the UKCAT, BMAT and MCAT in some cases. I wouldn't write the MCAT just for the UK, only if you've already written it. 

More importantly, why are you going to the UK? Is it because you can't get into medical school in North America? Keep in mind if you do go to the UK, you will have trouble coming back, only about 50-60% of UK medical grads are able to come back and not in any specialty or location they want. You can stay in the UK if you go, but you should probably research the UK medical system as it isn't as desirable a workplace as Canada. 

 

 

Why isn't it a desireable workplace in comparison to Canada?

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11 hours ago, medpak said:

Why isn't it a desireable workplace in comparison to Canada?

Income is lower, however better hours in general, slower training though, hard to find a consultant position due to few positions and as a result you end up as a middle grade staff for longer. 

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Super late reply, but UCAS isn't due for another month so I thought I might as well.  I'm starting graduate entry medicine at Oxford in September with a Canadian BSc.  I would say definitely go for it, especially if you are willing to work as a junior doctor in the UK.  Oxford requires the BMAT while most other schools require the UKCAT - for graduate entry they didn't seem to care about BMAT scores as much as they did at the undergraduate level. 

As far as extracurriculars are concerned, clinical and research experience are excellent and they don't really care all that much about other extracurriculars. Generally in the UK, some clinical experience (even just shadowing for a week) is almost expected.

As for graduate entry (A101) I wouldn't worry too much about competing against people with higher degrees - while people do have more schooling it is in a very specific area which can limit them somewhat.  My course is about 1/3 people with bachelors, 1/3 masters, and 1/3 PhDs.  You are limited to four medical schools by UCAS (this includes both A100 and A101) and you can certainly do a mix of both.  Graduate programs tend to be smaller and entry can be quite competitive, but they tend to take a more holistic approach to evaluating applications rather than undergraduate (A100) programs which tend to be a bit more mark focused. Overall, I would suggest finding programs that appeal to you and apply whether or not they are graduate. 

 

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On 8/28/2018 at 12:32 PM, medea said:

Super late reply, but UCAS isn't due for another month so I thought I might as well.  I'm starting graduate entry medicine at Oxford in September with a Canadian BSc.  I would say definitely go for it, especially if you are willing to work as a junior doctor in the UK.  Oxford requires the BMAT while most other schools require the UKCAT - for graduate entry they didn't seem to care about BMAT scores as much as they did at the undergraduate level. 

As far as extracurriculars are concerned, clinical and research experience are excellent and they don't really care all that much about other extracurriculars. Generally in the UK, some clinical experience (even just shadowing for a week) is almost expected.

As for graduate entry (A101) I wouldn't worry too much about competing against people with higher degrees - while people do have more schooling it is in a very specific area which can limit them somewhat.  My course is about 1/3 people with bachelors, 1/3 masters, and 1/3 PhDs.  You are limited to four medical schools by UCAS (this includes both A100 and A101) and you can certainly do a mix of both.  Graduate programs tend to be smaller and entry can be quite competitive, but they tend to take a more holistic approach to evaluating applications rather than undergraduate (A100) programs which tend to be a bit more mark focused. Overall, I would suggest finding programs that appeal to you and apply whether or not they are graduate. 

 

just out of curiosity what was your GPA?

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