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Borntobewild

The slow decay of dentistry

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4 hours ago, Confusedprehealth said:

Aus, NZ And IR grads can still practice in the US if they take a 2 year bridging program...

That's true for all international dentists. Except the bottom line cost of going to Australia, New Zealand, or Ireland for 4/5 years and then 2 years in the US will be the highest of any other options in the world for practicing general dentistry. We're talking at least $500,000 Canadian but probably more like $600,000 for tuition alone, not including living costs.

The incentive of going abroad to such an expensive program is that it is sufficient training to start working where you want to live. This is probably why we don't see a lot of students from those programs in the IS 2 year programs

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Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.

Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.

From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.

I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.

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10 hours ago, AncientDentist said:

Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.

Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.

From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.

I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.

Honestly, this was a refreshing perspective to read. I think a lot of us get lost in the doom and gloom and forget to be thankful for what we have and the opportunities that this profession provides us. Cheers. 

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