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maplesyrup

Questions about universities

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I'm planning on attending med school, but first I need my undergrad. Right now I'm looking at a BA in psychology, because I have an interest in the brain, and how it works. I am considering neurosurgery, so making sure I get my resume right is important, and I'm willing to take the time to do it correctly the first time. I would be able to take all the science courses my little heart desires, as well as the obvious psychology, and an English class (which is a very weird pre requisite some med schools around here have).
I have two issues with this, the first being that I question the level of interest a medical school would have in me as a BA. Secondarily, I have heard through the grapevine that if I ever did want to get into neurosurgery or the like, I'd better be ready to get a PHD, and I can't see myself getting that with a BA. I could go back to high school and complete the math pre requisites I never did, since I literally had no clue pre requisites existed until grade 12, and I am now 22. Does this sound appropriate to all of you, or is there something obvious I'm missing here. Thanks!
 

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In Canada no priority is given to the particular degree you have - you will based on your interests I suspect have to chose between your interest in how the brain biologically works - ie say a degree in neuroscience, or how the the brain functionally works - which is basically psychology. Of course you mix with electives etc aspects of both. 

What are the math prerequisites for? 

To get a phd you need to have a couple of things - one is a honours degree with high enough average, which if you get into medical school you basically will have. The next thing is some one willing to take you on as a graduate student - which means you would have to show some potential in that particular area of interest. 

It is common to have graduate degrees with neurosurgery - in fact often you have a year to do that within the residency program. The point is you can get the graduate degree later potentially - so like you say get ready to phd (which is not actually required for neurosurgery, but common enough) doesn't mean you have to jump on it right away either. I should say though like many things in medicine having higher education can help you get the residency program of choice in the first place. 

There is also a long to steps along the way you are planning out - not bad of course, but the primary focus for medical school probably still should be an undergraduate degree that gets you the high GPA (not average - they are different) that gets you into medical school in the first place. That might be a degree in psychology for you (although I should say you will have to be careful with the upper year courses in psych as they aren't exactly easy to get high grades in - ha, speaking from experience I guess as psychology is one of my degrees. Science was steady moderately hard all the way, but psych just got progressively worse ha. Hard to get 90s in essay courses). 

 

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1 hour ago, rmorelan said:

In Canada no priority is given to the particular degree you have - you will based on your interests I suspect have to chose between your interest in how the brain biologically works - ie say a degree in neuroscience, or how the the brain functionally works - which is basically psychology. Of course you mix with electives etc aspects of both. 

What are the math prerequisites for? 

To get a phd you need to have a couple of things - one is a honours degree with high enough average, which if you get into medical school you basically will have. The next thing is some one willing to take you on as a graduate student - which means you would have to show some potential in that particular area of interest. 

It is common to have graduate degrees with neurosurgery - in fact often you have a year to do that within the residency program. The point is you can get the graduate degree later potentially - so like you say get ready to phd (which is not actually required for neurosurgery, but common enough) doesn't mean you have to jump on it right away either. I should say though like many things in medicine having higher education can help you get the residency program of choice in the first place. 

There is also a long to steps along the way you are planning out - not bad of course, but the primary focus for medical school probably still should be an undergraduate degree that gets you the high GPA (not average - they are different) that gets you into medical school in the first place. That might be a degree in psychology for you (although I should say you will have to be careful with the upper year courses in psych as they aren't exactly easy to get high grades in - ha, speaking from experience I guess as psychology is one of my degrees. Science was steady moderately hard all the way, but psych just got progressively worse ha. Hard to get 90s in essay courses). 

 

Thanks!

I'd ideally like to do a little bit of both of neuroscience, and psychology, but I have to consider my GPA and what will serve me the best, and what I can learn independently. To get any bachelor of science, you have to have chemistry and pre calculus as grade 12 courses, which I don't have. I wasn't doing too well in grade 10 math so I was instructed to drop the calculus part (BAD IDEA). The teachers never warned me that this would have a direct impact on my further education, and because they lost all faith in me, I lost all faith in myself and did the bare minimum for the rest of my high school career. Thankfully I've smartened up. My particular research interests lie in concussions, post concussion syndrome, and brain injuries that don't show up on MRI, and I live in brain injury central because everyone here loves rodeos and contact sports. 

I was thinking that doing the higher education would be better suited to residency. For one thing, you are getting to practice what you preach, and you have more support system. Again, I wasn't sure if it was totally required or not before hand. I did a psychology course just this year in my own time and I did very well on the essays, although I hate talking about myself for grades. Next time I'm opening up about myself to others is at my autopsy.

Thanks again!

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4 minutes ago, maplesyrup said:

Thanks!

I'd ideally like to do a little bit of both of neuroscience, and psychology, but I have to consider my GPA and what will serve me the best, and what I can learn independently. To get any bachelor of science, you have to have chemistry and pre calculus as grade 12 courses, which I don't have. I wasn't doing too well in grade 10 math so I was instructed to drop the calculus part (BAD IDEA). The teachers never warned me that this would have a direct impact on my further education, and because they lost all faith in me, I lost all faith in myself and did the bare minimum for the rest of my high school career. Thankfully I've smartened up. My particular research interests lie in concussions, post concussion syndrome, and brain injuries that don't show up on MRI, and I live in brain injury central because everyone here loves rodeos and contact sports. 

I was thinking that doing the higher education would be better suited to residency. For one thing, you are getting to practice what you preach, and you have more support system. Again, I wasn't sure if it was totally required or not before hand. I did a psychology course just this year in my own time and I did very well on the essays, although I hate talking about myself for grades. Next time I'm opening up about myself to others is at my autopsy.

Thanks again!

Ha,

First I should mention that once you actually get into a program somewhere all of this rock solid rules you are taking about tend to disappear to a large degree. People with good grades in university can transition or take various courses it may not seems as easy for them to take otherwise. In particular at the very least you won't have  trouble getting a minor in neuroscience with psychology (assuming you are a university that offers both). That likely means access to labs and research if you wan to that way. That doesn't mean you have to either for that matter (and once you have a minor in something it is pretty easy to move that to a full degree if you wanted to). That being said you will really have to make sure no matter what you do you are getting the grades needed for the future goals you have. 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, rmorelan said:

Ha,

First I should mention that once you actually get into a program somewhere all of this rock solid rules you are taking about tend to disappear to a large degree. People with good grades in university can transition or take various courses it may not seems as easy for them to take otherwise. In particular at the very least you won't have  trouble getting a minor in neuroscience with psychology (assuming you are a university that offers both). That likely means access to labs and research if you wan to that way. That doesn't mean you have to either for that matter (and once you have a minor in something it is pretty easy to move that to a full degree if you wanted to). That being said you will really have to make sure no matter what you do you are getting the grades needed for the future goals you have. 

 

 

I'm doing a few college courses now and I have a 3.9 average THANK GOD. I'm going to really have to work at it but I am willing to, and I'll also be having some long conversations with universities about how to best get to where I need to be. I am a little older (22) so I'll be a lot older when it's all said and done, but I don't mind that.

Thanks again!

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1 minute ago, maplesyrup said:

I'm doing a few college courses now and I have a 3.9 average THANK GOD. I'm going to really have to work at it but I am willing to, and I'll also be having some long conversations with universities about how to best get to where I need to be. I am a little older (22) so I'll be a lot older when it's all said and done, but I don't mind that.

Thanks again!

you will still be a lot younger than many - check out the non-trad section of the forum for instance. Don't let your age be a distraction.

 

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7 minutes ago, rmorelan said:

you will still be a lot younger than many - check out the non-trad section of the forum for instance. Don't let your age be a distraction.

 

I won't, my great uncle was a surgeon, he didn't retire until he was 81 and that was because his wife made him. Age is just a number, and I will be that number if I follow my passions or not, so I might as well follow my passions.

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59 minutes ago, IMislove said:

Average age this year for queen's is 24, and honestly, a ton of us are over that. So yeah, don't let age make you worry. Everyone's journey is different, good luck :).

Aww, thank you! I'm not worried about age, and congratulations on getting in!

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