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KeyzerSoze

Thinking of getting highlights in my hair...

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Now persoanlly I can't imagine how anyone could possibly see highlights as being unkempt or egregious, but heaven forbid some extremely conservative interviewer thinks this way. Do you think there's any chance I'd be judged negatively at interviews for having highlights in my hair? I'm a guy, which is why I' asking...

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It's not about interviewers being conservative. It's about you making, ahem, style choices consistent with being a tool and/or douchebag. So... don't do it. One of my friends had highlights as an R1 and he was rightly taken to task for it. 

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12 minutes ago, A-Stark said:

It's not about interviewers being conservative. It's about you making, ahem, style choices consistent with being a tool and/or douchebag. So... don't do it. One of my friends had highlights as an R1 and he was rightly taken to task for it. 

I see subtlety is not your forte...just as well I suppose. There are probably many people in the medical field who have the same opinion as you...probably too many for me to take any risks. Not that I agree with your attitude, because I absolutely don't.

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We obviously can't answer this for you. The goal is to look as clean and professional as possible for the interview. If they look professional, then fine. If you have to question it (and it messes with your interview confidence) then it's a definite no. You've got plenty of time after you interview to do whatever you'd like. Play it safe and wait it out!

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Why would you open yourself up to a bias like that? You may think it is just a fashion choice but people will make their own inferences, maybe to you even making unwise/rash choices in the future. Yes, for girls it isn't as bad, but as a guy it's much more likely to raise some eyebrows. With appearance, you want to look professional and how interviewers want the school to be represented by its students. Who knows, your interviewers might even think that future patients will not have confidence in you from the start. No can say whether it may or may not have any effect, but there would be more potential negatives than positives with it. Just hold off on it and do it once you're in.

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4 minutes ago, SomethingCool said:

Why would you open yourself up to a bias like that? You may think it is just a fashion choice but people will make their own inferences, maybe to you even making unwise/rash choices in the future. Yes, for girls it isn't as bad, but as a guy it's much more likely to raise some eyebrows. With appearance, you want to look professional and how interviewers want the school to be represented by its students. Who knows, your interviewers might even think that future patients will not have confidence in you from the start. No can say whether it may or may not have any effect, but there would be more potential negatives than positives with it. Just hold off on it and do it once you're in.

Yeah I have family friends in medicine, and despite the progressive agenda that schools like UofT push, many people in the field are still very traditional, so yeah I think I'm going to hold off.

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Like every other single thing applicants do, the answer is "it depends". There is a spectrum of style choices that you can make and there really is no way to know what will or will not hurt you during an interview. Obviously be yourself, but your choices should not be a distraction to interviewers. Just be smart and exercise good judgement.

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Ha, you know this is where the fact that medicine is still and probably will continue to be so just such a conservative profession comes into play. That comes up in so many ways both subtle and overt - and honestly once you get into the field you probably don't even notice how conservative it is until someone does something just a bit outside of the norm or asks a question like this. That forces you to confront it a bit. 

For instance I don't know any male doctor at any of the sites I work that that has hair highlights - a fact I have never even thought about before. Almost none of them have what could be described as having a non conservative hair style in any fashion actually - the most extreme I have seen is hair a bit on the long side, and that is about it. Even there when you see it is more likely to be somewhat specialized places - more rural areas, working with particular populations - more niche stuff I suppose(?) 

This goes into a lot of other areas as well - and again particularly for male doctors. It is a part of the professional uniform as it where. It extends to what goes up in social media (ha there was quite the purge of facebook posting around CARMS time). 

Not saying all of this is perfectly justifiable of course - just that this is how medicine is. 

Edited by rmorelan

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1 hour ago, Intrepid86 said:

You're applying to be a doctor, not a salesperson at Hot Topic.

And whether or not I get accepted, I've demonstrated through my grades, research and ECs that I'm more than competent of becoming one. Kind of unfortunate that it ultimately might come down to whether or not I have streaks of color going through my hair, but that's the way it is I guess.

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3 hours ago, KeyzerSoze said:

And whether or not I get accepted, I've demonstrated through my grades, research and ECs that I'm more than competent of becoming one. Kind of unfortunate that it ultimately might come down to whether or not I have streaks of color going through my hair, but that's the way it is I guess.

you are right - that's the problem. As silly as it sounds appearances in medicine still matter. 

It won't come down to that - because you wouldn't get the interview without all that stuff you mention. But when things are things competitive - and they are that competitive - something thinks like that can impact the end outcome. Medicine in many was is very conformist - that can be a strength and a weakness in the field. 

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I don't buy the conservative argument in Canada. I see it made on SDN, but here there are so many med students with coloured hair, gauged ears, etc. etc. I seriously doubt it's much of a risk at all.

I'm a current male med student with various aesthetic choices that are not conservative, and I've never had a staff say anything or glower at me because of it. Gotten along just fine with elderly, fussy doctors, got good evals from them, really no issues.

If you're dressed professionally, there's really such a minimal chance that they think anything but "Oh that's what the kids are doing now" and move on

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A couple people in my class with coloured hair, like lavender, blue, grey. Some have been told to change it. Not sure if they had it during interviews. 

I'm a guy and I was told point blank to take out my nose ring by a resident. 

If you get highlights, i would keep it to natural hair colours. I don't think it affects people's ability to be a doctor, but perception is everything. 
yeah, don't care what others think of you, do what you want with your body. Just be aware that it's super conservative looks wise. 

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I got a single hot pink hair streak as a resident due to hairdresser error (it was supposed to be platinum). I got it covered after 3 days with a deep red which, while obvious, didn’t get the squinty eyed attention that the other colour did. I felt self conscious and awkward with the pink. 

At this point, I’m saving crazy colours once I’m settled in staff life.

my advice to you is...if you think it could be a deal breaker for you, all other things being equal why take a risk? You don’t want to agonize afterwards about it.

 

 

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13 hours ago, Intrepid86 said:

You're applying to be a doctor, not a salesperson at Hot Topic.

Are people here trolling? Do you guys know what highlights are? We aren't talking about pink or green streaks people, LOL. I know a bunch of people who have natural highlights. Oh man.....

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56 minutes ago, PhD2MD said:

1. I don't mean to offend, but why is this a serious conversation?

2. Several of my peers were admitted with tattoos showing, and very nom conservative hairstyles.

1. If it were up to me it wouldn't be.

2. Which school was this exactly?

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12 hours ago, KeyzerSoze said:

1. If it were up to me it wouldn't be.

2. Which school was this exactly?

1. You are the one asking this....it's not a problem...really. I hope everyone reading this realizes that stops worrying about it.
2. U of T & McMaster.

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Umm I guess it depends what color as well as the hairstyle to begin with. Natural colour highlights with a well groomed haircut may not be that bad. You want med school students to be able to express themselves and not be too restricited in personal choices like fashion (we are in our 20s and young). But medicine is a pretty conservative profession and i can see some ppl looking at you funny lol. Also you are kinda representing your school or workplace when you interact with patients and clients so I can see why they would ask you to change. Might come accross as unprofessional or project some sort of a negative image. Personally i wouldn't care but bc I can see how some people would, I dont see why you would risk it especially for interviews.

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3 hours ago, NLengr said:

Pretty sure every single nurse at my center (male or female) have at least one giant sleeve tattoo.

While I'm definitely for freedom of aesthetic expression, I have to say that I think being a nurse requires far lower qualifications than being a doctor.

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8 hours ago, KeyzerSoze said:

While I'm definitely for freedom of aesthetic expression, I have to say that I think being a nurse requires far lower qualifications than being a doctor.

Much higher gossiping qualifications though.....

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