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RichardUnderwoodMTB

Biology vs. BioMedical vs. Health Sciences

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Hey all, here's the thing. I've been accepted into UOttawa's Biology (BSc), Health Sciecne (BHSc), and Biomedical Science (BSc) and I'm struggling to decide which of these programs I should go for. Anyone faced this dilemma before? Does one degree stand out over the rest or could Med schools care less about what the degree is and just look at the GPA? I'm into most of the courses in BioMed but really dont want to take physics or calculus. Biology is pretty basic and 3rd/4th year are basically all electives so very customizable (but BIOLOGY just sounds really general and doesn't have the ring BioMed does lol). Health Science is a wild card as it all seems ok  (not really interested in all the socialogy and physcology involved in that) but its BHSc so it might narrow my path if Med school doesn't pan out. I really like anatomy and tangable things and less into pure sciences and math. Any thoughts on this matter? 

 

Cheers,

Richard

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Finishing up at uO. Your degree does not matter at all. Take the program that will give you the highest GPA, don't worry about how the program sounds, or its future potential if med doesn't work out. GPA is basically the #1 most important thing in Canadian admissions. 

Take the program with the courses you're most interested in. Pretty sure you need calculus for biology and biomed, but for biomed, I believe you can take BPS2110 (pharmaceuticals) instead of physics. 

Keep in mind that you can also do a major in biology with a minor in something else etc. There are lots of degree combinations but if your goal is med, GPA is key and your program doesn't matter. 

 

Hope that helps :) 

 

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All of those degrees are equally unemployable.

Please avail yourself of the search function, re: GPA >> MCAT > ECs.

Med schools don't care what your degree is in. Please go to their school websites for info re: prerequisite courses, course load criteria, etc. for MD admissions.

Pursue a program that interests you as you will have to work hard for your grades. Interest in the subject matter will make this more tolerable.

Also, please chill out you're in grade 12 and have a long journey ahead. Medicine isn't the end all be all, and is not worth idolizing. When you get to university, focus on adjusting academically and socially first.

Lastly, stay off this forum and go have some fun.

Good luck.

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I'm going to sidebar here and talk a bit about interest and motivation. An average student will do better in courses they like, and noticeably worse in ones they don't like. The hallmark of a truly strong student is the ability to do consistently well regardless of interest level, because they're able to maintain the same good discipline and study habits from one course to another. It helps to be interested in what you're studying, but ideally it shouldn't matter, and won't always be the case anyways, especially in a terminal degree simply meant to be a stepping stone to something else.

I did a Biology degree. It sounds general and boring, and a lot of it certainly was. That being said, boring is highly underrated. When it comes to getting high grades, I'll take boring and predictable any day. The more routine and streamlined your process is, the better. Much like in medicine, when stuff gets exciting, then something's probably going wrong. Of course though, individual opinions will vary. At the end of the day, only you know your abilities and the circumstances you need to do well. Just follow whatever that is.

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What types of courses do you enjoy? Math, science, psychology, sociology?  Courses where the answer is either “right” or “wrong?” Courses where you do lots of writing? All of those will determine which program you will enjoy the most. Do the minutiae of biology interest you? The social determinants of health (which are huge by the way)? Are you better at lab work or writing papers? Examine your strengths and weaknesses, and choose your program based on those, combined with your actual interests (you tend to do better in courses that you actually enjoy).

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