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RoamingRhino

Which Program is Best for Medical School in Canada?

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I'm a grade 12 student that is graduating this year. I want to go to medical school, but I want to go to an undergrad that prepares me the most for it (GPA, MCAT) and other requirements. My options I'm thinking of right now are:
Waterloo Biomedical Science (no co-op)
Pros: Good structure and has many courses that are perquisites for med schools Cons: I heard it was hard (courses like embryology) which I won't be able to get a high GPA
Waterloo Honours Science (no co-op)
Pros: Lots of flexibility in terms of electives (so you can boost GPA)
Cons: Idk (no structure?)
 
Waterloo Life Science (co-op)
Pros: Idk
Cons: Idk
 
McMaster Life Science (co-op)
Pros: McMaster is known for their sciences
Cons: Enrollment says 1000 so large class sizes? Waterloo ranks higher than McMaster in terms of reputation (if that matters). Waterloo is known for co-op.
 
Guelph Biomedical Science (don't think so)
Pros: Idk
Cons: Haven't heard much about it (like it doesn't have a big reputation)
 
Would co-op matter? Like if I don't get into med school would it get me a higher chance to get jobs and would it be good for graduate school? Which school has the better co-op? In terms of GPA, which program is the best? In terms of preparing me for the MCAT, which program is the best? Which school is best in terms of marks, ECs, community? I'm thinking of McMaster Life Science because they have a medical school and I've heard McMaster is a good school for science (not sure tho).
 
In general, which program would give me the highest chance of getting into med school?
 
Can you provide me a more in-depth explanation of why this program is good (if you took it)?
Are there any other programs I should consider (other than McMaster Health Science and Western Medical Science which I did not get into)?
 
Correct me if I'm wrong with any of the programs (I really don't know much about them).

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I don’t know anything about the programs you mentioned. Generally speaking, it is not about the program, it is aboutbyou, your priorities, motivation, focus, discipline, time management, stress management, studying right for you, knowing when to go for help, working hard and smart consistently, and having a structured life so that you are not derailed, e.g., hanging with party animals, having a s.o. Who does not have common values and goals, who becomes too much of a distraction and can pull you down.

i took a specialized program in exer+sir science that had internships allowing me to apply my theoretical knowledge with the elderly who had chronic diseases, thereby reinforcing my knowledge, giving me practical experience and better preparing me for medicine. I balanced my courses that had voluminous material with easy electives such as acting and other courses having multiple choice exams dependent upon the course text which allowed me to study the text rather than attend the lectures. One prof made fun of me when I did attend one lecture, however, my strategy paid off as I got the highest grade in my class. 

I worked exceedingly hard.in undergrad, again my strategy worked as I became a straight A student, despite the fact I was far from the strongest lightbulb in the classes. I worked smart and hard and was exhausted at the end of every semester. I also lost all my friends in the process but it was well worth it as I achieved my goal. My best friends are now classmates from med school, however, he hardly see each other as we are in different cities and each, as residents, have virtually no time available. 

In acceptances, I also see many students study geography? which has nothing to do with medicine. It is always good to have a Plan B, as life is uncertain at best. Good luck! :P

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Where you go doesn't really matter. If you're truly good,  then you'll likely do well anywhere, and vice versa if you're not, then you won't.

When it comes to admission to professional schools, undergrad isn't so much a time for preparation as it is a time for performance. The bulk of your preparation is actually complete by the end of high school, where you've hopefully developed the right habits and attitudes that will serve you well later when it counts.

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On 6/1/2019 at 2:50 AM, RoamingRhino said:
I'm a grade 12 student that is graduating this year. I want to go to medical school, but I want to go to an undergrad that prepares me the most for it (GPA, MCAT) and other requirements. My options I'm thinking of right now are:
Waterloo Biomedical Science (no co-op)
Pros: Good structure and has many courses that are perquisites for med schools Cons: I heard it was hard (courses like embryology) which I won't be able to get a high GPA
Waterloo Honours Science (no co-op)
Pros: Lots of flexibility in terms of electives (so you can boost GPA)
Cons: Idk (no structure?)
 
Waterloo Life Science (co-op)
Pros: Idk
Cons: Idk
 
McMaster Life Science (co-op)
Pros: McMaster is known for their sciences
Cons: Enrollment says 1000 so large class sizes? Waterloo ranks higher than McMaster in terms of reputation (if that matters). Waterloo is known for co-op.
 
Guelph Biomedical Science (don't think so)
Pros: Idk
Cons: Haven't heard much about it (like it doesn't have a big reputation)
 
Would co-op matter? Like if I don't get into med school would it get me a higher chance to get jobs and would it be good for graduate school? Which school has the better co-op? In terms of GPA, which program is the best? In terms of preparing me for the MCAT, which program is the best? Which school is best in terms of marks, ECs, community? I'm thinking of McMaster Life Science because they have a medical school and I've heard McMaster is a good school for science (not sure tho).
 
In general, which program would give me the highest chance of getting into med school?
 
Can you provide me a more in-depth explanation of why this program is good (if you took it)?
Are there any other programs I should consider (other than McMaster Health Science and Western Medical Science which I did not get into)?
 
Correct me if I'm wrong with any of the programs (I really don't know much about them).

If you couldn't  get into western med sci, you should be a bit careful. Unless things have changed, Western med sci was never that competitive of a program to get into. If you didn't work hard in high school and know you can and will work much harder in university its fine to focus on life sci, but if not I would be cautious and have a solid backup option. Medical school is very competitive and I was really saddened to find out how little some of the non-healthcare professions get to do in healthcare (except for nursing). 

 

All in all, if you think you can work a lot harder in university and you really want to become a doctor, Mac Life Sci is not a bad choice. 

If you worked pretty hard in high school, you aren't really at the top of your year in high school, i'd probably choose Waterloo w/ co-op because if your GPA doesn't look so good in first year UG you can focus on co-op, business and alternative careers without wasting too much time or money. 

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To add an alternative view point to above, I would not stake too much at this point on your high school performance. Looking back, high school marks really don’t say much since there are huge cultural differences in regard to marking difficulty between schools to the point where an 80 at one high school may be a 90 at another. For example, I graduated high school with an average under 90 and am now in med school, while I know a lot of people who got above 90 and are not in med school or who are still pursuing it after trying for a few years (a pretty common scenario actually). All this to say that it’s very hard to assess where you stand compared to peers until you have completed a year or 2 of undergrad. In regard to your program, it doesn’t matter from a med school perspective as long as it will play to your strengths and give you the background to write the mcat. In terms of back up plans, something with coop is nice to ensure you have some built in work experience and practical skills. Good luck in your choices!

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Just go to whatever school you will have the most social supports at, and pursue a course of study that is interesting to you. When you choose courses, go for ones that have professors with good reviews and evaluations that are MCQ based. Get involved on campus and in your community. That's it.

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I agree with much of the advice above. I would suggest visiting all the schools and choosing the one you feel like you would fit in the most because undergraduate reputation is not considered by med school admission committees. This is a choice that will stay with you for the next several years so make sure it is a good one. I currently go to Guelph and I regret not visiting every school before making a choice - I haven't adjusted well to the environment since coming. However, people are very supportive and friendly, and I was able to achieve a 3.93 GPA first year, without overworking myself - a feat that is not shared with my peers at UofT. I was able to juggle school with tons of extracurriculars and performing music. 

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+1 Guelph

Pros: excellent professors who actually care about you, opportunities for medicine relevant courses, fairly reasonable to do well with GPA, few pre-meds = non-competitive/non cutthroat environment, beautiful campus/city, amazing food, lots of opportunity for research, the bullring, wind your toy.

Cons: no teaching hospitals so limited ability to gain clinical exposure (which IMO is overrated anyway), not too many resources for premeds (but take some initiative and it doesn't matter).

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