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OT/PT accepted/waitlist/decline 2020 cycle

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On 5/30/2020 at 9:12 PM, AlliPT said:

Applied (all PT): Mcmaster, Queens, Western, U of T 

Accepted: McMaster, Queens, U of T

Waitlisted: Western (upper 3rd)

CGPA: 3.88

SubGPA: 3.93

Experience: OTA & PTA diploma with placements in a clinic, LTC, and consolidation in a hospital, as well as positions on Dean's Council and Student Representation Committees, 4 years' work experience in a multidisciplinary clinic with a Chiropractor, naturopath, and physio as a rehab assistant, and some volunteer with a local homeless support organization. 

References: one from my current employer at the clinic, and from an OT who was also the OTA/PTA program coordinator and my former professor.

I am leaning toward McMaster at this point! Originally Western was my first choice, and I feel like I may still get an offer but I like the Mac catchment area better, and their NSS opportunity is super cool! 

Congrats to everyone who got accepted and waitlisted! They're all big accomplishments! 

Hey! I have an OTA/PTA diploma and am interested in doing a bridging degree program and applying to PT/OT, do you mind if I ask where you did your degree? Did you get many transfer credits from your diploma?
I have been hesitant to apply to any Universities because I wasn’t sure if it was possible to get accepted In a masters from a bridging program, but your comment gives me hope! Congratulations on your offers! 

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I graduated as an OTA/PTA/RTA almost 3 yrs ago and decided to do the bridging program to finish my degree. I’m in BC and I had 2 options for universities to finish with my degree with- Thompson Rivers Uni and University of Calgary. Definitely recommend! I was able to work full time as an OTA/PTA and finish my degree over 2 years. I ended up getting my BHSc at TRU

Edited by SpringOT2020
Meant to reply to A987

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3 hours ago, PTcruiser said:

Nothing for me. Do you know which half of the waitlist you're on? When I asked, they said I was on the bottom half of the NS waitlist. I'd love to know how long the list is, but they couldn't tell me that.

I was told I was in the top half but as you said it’s super hard to judge not knowing how long the list is. I couldn’t really find much info on past forums either about how much it moves or how many people are on it 

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30 minutes ago, A987 said:

Hey! I have an OTA/PTA diploma and am interested in doing a bridging degree program and applying to PT/OT, do you mind if I ask where you did your degree? Did you get many transfer credits from your diploma?
I have been hesitant to apply to any Universities because I wasn’t sure if it was possible to get accepted In a masters from a bridging program, but your comment gives me hope! Congratulations on your offers! 

Hey!! I did mine at Thompson rivers university! I applied through my colleges articulation program. They transferred 54 credits, and for pt school I ensured that I took year 1 anatomy and physiology 1 and 2, and year 1 psychology 1 and 2, and stats! It was a great experience and I think really teaches you to problem solve and learn on your own! It took me 3 years as I worked full time as a rehab assistant in a clinic :)

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6 minutes ago, AlliPT said:

Hey!! I did mine at Thompson rivers university! I applied through my colleges articulation program. They transferred 54 credits, and for pt school I ensured that I took year 1 anatomy and physiology 1 and 2, and year 1 psychology 1 and 2, and stats! It was a great experience and I think really teaches you to problem solve and learn on your own! It took me 3 years as I worked full time as a rehab assistant in a clinic :)

 

14 minutes ago, SpringOT2020 said:

I graduated as an OTA/PTA/RTA almost 3 yrs ago and decided to do the bridging program to finish my degree. I’m in BC and I had 2 options for universities to finish with my degree with- Thompson Rivers Uni and University of Calgary. Definitely recommend! I was able to work full time as an OTA/PTA and finish my degree over 2 years. I ended up getting my BHSc at TRU

Hey, just wonder are those programs at TRU and UOfC undergrad or master programs? What is the difference after you graduate from those programs and graduate from other master programs?

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25 minutes ago, rrxxccooll said:

 

Hey, just wonder are those programs at TRU and UOfC undergrad or master programs? What is the difference after you graduate from those programs and graduate from other master programs?

Both are undergrad- you get you BHSc from TRU and Community Rehabilitation degree from UofC. I don't think there's really that big a difference between the programs, but UofC does have a practicum component whereas TRU does not. I'm not really sure about the degree from UofC, but the one from TRU is basically just a bridging degree, you can't really do much more career wise with it once you have it. I have a friend who got her community rehab degree from UofC and is now just finishing her QY for PT at McGill. 

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I just accepted my offer to Queen's OT so spots should be opening up on the UofT and Western waitlist! Good luck to everyone. 

Also, does anyone know if there is a Facebook group for Queen's OT? 

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3 hours ago, OT18 said:

I just accepted my offer to Queen's OT so spots should be opening up on the UofT and Western waitlist! Good luck to everyone. 

Also, does anyone know if there is a Facebook group for Queen's OT? 

Yes there is! It was sent in the original acceptance email on May 29! At least they sent the link in my PT acceptance letter, if you need a link just lemme know because it’s a OT/PT group!

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13 minutes ago, OTPLEASE2382 said:

for those who have firmly accepted their acceptances, does it take sometime for it to appear on orpas or does it appear immediately?

I accepted mine yesterday and it shows Firmly Accepted. 

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hi guys, i provisionally accepted my offer for OT at UoT. Was wondering if I still had to pay the deposit due on June 12 even tho i haven't firmly accepted the offer yet. Thanks

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8 hours ago, OT18 said:

I just accepted my offer to Queen's OT so spots should be opening up on the UofT and Western waitlist! Good luck to everyone. 

Also, does anyone know if there is a Facebook group for Queen's OT? 

Hey what made you choose Queens?

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Hi all,

I'm still very much on the fence about OT schools and still deciding between UofT, mac, and queens. I wanted to choose the program that will set me up for success and ease me into the clinical stuff. I've looked into the courses but really they all teach the same stuff. Also UofT and queens do still implement case studies everywhere in their curriculum so I don't see how it really becomes different than problem based learning.

Only things I found different were

- McMaster does the first placement very early (which makes me a bit nervous)

- UofT does musculoskeletal and neuro in the same semester together whereas mac and queens separate it, so I'm thinking that would be challenging. 

- Queens seems to have a way heavier course load (6-7 courses)

Can someone help! What made you guys make your decisions?

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16 minutes ago, OT1996 said:

Hi all,

I'm still very much on the fence about schools and still deciding between UofT, mac, and queens. I wanted to choose the program that will set me up for success and ease me into the clinical stuff. I've looked into the courses but really they all teach the same stuff. Also UofT and queens do still implement case studies everywhere in their curriculum so I don't see how it really becomes different than problem based learning.

Only things I found different were

- McMaster does the first placement very early (which makes me a bit nervous)

- UofT does musculoskeletal and neuro in the same semester together whereas mac and queens separate it, so I'm thinking that would be challenging. 

- Queens seems to have a way heavier course load (6-7 courses)

Can someone help! What made you guys make your decisions?

Hey!! I've been on the fence with U of T and Mac, but a few things about mac: their curriculum on their website (for PT I'm assuming), they dont do neuro and msk separately- mac does a spiral curriculum where they do msk, neuro, and cardiorespiratory each semester and each unit and start basic and build on complexity. This is actually very relevant to the real world because in a clinic or hospital you may have a patient with shoulder pain from an injury, also a concussion, and could be suffering from diabetes. This is msk, neuro, and cardiometabolic all at once and we have to be able to switch things up and do assessments of multiple systems. U of t does block semesters where you learn msk and then dont touch it again til the national exam - msk, then neuro, then cardio, and it's all segregated. While this is nice for learning, it's not as practical. U of t also does their placement in like may/june, so if you get an msk placement you havent done it since december. I dont know much about queens but I think it's more didactic.

They all do problem based learning, yes, and queens and u of t were recently on probation. Mac never has been, and it seems that the other schools are implementing criteria from mcmaster. Having an early placement can be good because you can learn all the theory you want but until you've been put out of your comfort zone, real learning cant happen. Queens does their first placement early as well I believe. I'm leaning toward mcmaster because 

1. The spiral curriculum seems difficult, but the most relevant to the real world. 

2. They do 4 longer placements rather than 5 shorter placements, giving the opportunity to build stronger relationships and get more deeply involved with patients, and see some from intake to discharge.

3. Toronto is big, loud, and expensive (some people love it, not for me)

4. The smaller class size can allow for more of a community feel and allow for more time with professors if needed. 

Overall, PT school wont be easing into the clinical world, and growth occurs outside our comfort zone! I've asked a billion questions to mac and u of t so let me know if I can help anymore!

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50 minutes ago, AlliPT said:

Hey!! I've been on the fence with U of T and Mac, but a few things about mac: their curriculum on their website (for PT I'm assuming), they dont do neuro and msk separately- mac does a spiral curriculum where they do msk, neuro, and cardiorespiratory each semester and each unit and start basic and build on complexity. This is actually very relevant to the real world because in a clinic or hospital you may have a patient with shoulder pain from an injury, also a concussion, and could be suffering from diabetes. This is msk, neuro, and cardiometabolic all at once and we have to be able to switch things up and do assessments of multiple systems. U of t does block semesters where you learn msk and then dont touch it again til the national exam - msk, then neuro, then cardio, and it's all segregated. While this is nice for learning, it's not as practical. U of t also does their placement in like may/june, so if you get an msk placement you havent done it since december. I dont know much about queens but I think it's more didactic.

They all do problem based learning, yes, and queens and u of t were recently on probation. Mac never has been, and it seems that the other schools are implementing criteria from mcmaster. Having an early placement can be good because you can learn all the theory you want but until you've been put out of your comfort zone, real learning cant happen. Queens does their first placement early as well I believe. I'm leaning toward mcmaster because 

1. The spiral curriculum seems difficult, but the most relevant to the real world. 

2. They do 4 longer placements rather than 5 shorter placements, giving the opportunity to build stronger relationships and get more deeply involved with patients, and see some from intake to discharge.

3. Toronto is big, loud, and expensive (some people love it, not for me)

4. The smaller class size can allow for more of a community feel and allow for more time with professors if needed. 

Overall, PT school wont be easing into the clinical world, and growth occurs outside our comfort zone! I've asked a billion questions to mac and u of t so let me know if I can help anymore!

Hey I should have specified, it's for OT.

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