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Accepted/Rejected/Deferred/Waitlisted for Current Applicants

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My score this year was 65.45 and seeing as the average IP accepted score was ~74, I'm wondering if it is even possible for me to get near close to that by next year? It's hard not to self doubt. For any of you who were rejected in the past, did you find that focusing on your weaknesses really improved your scores over the year? For me, it's the interview that I'll need to work on (26/40).

 You should call Dal and set up an appointment to get feedback! I remember a Med1 telling me about this at the interview weekend, they will look at your scores specifically and answer your questions

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My score this year was 65.45 and seeing as the average IP accepted score was ~74, I'm wondering if it is even possible for me to get near close to that by next year? It's hard not to self doubt. For any of you who were rejected in the past, did you find that focusing on your weaknesses really improved your scores over the year? For me, it's the interview that I'll need to work on (26/40).

I'd echo everyone's feedback. You can do it!

 

- MMI is a skill that *significantly* improves with practice. Since you are IP, start practicing for MMI now. You will develop confidence and can boost your score up by several points by Nov.

- As stated previously, schedule an appointment with Dal to go over your application. Make a list of questions to ask beforehand on your scores, experiences and what change they'd recommend. They are very helpful. Make notes during the meeting and understand what your weak areas and make changes appropriately. This exercise will boost up your points as well. 

 

Good luck! 

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I also got rejected this year, but I do want to say that you definitely shouldn't give up. A 26/40 isn't terrible - the average for accepted people was around a 31, which with more preparation, you can definitely achieve. Reflect on what went wrong, on where you could have improved, prepare a while in advance, and give it another shot. 

 

In the mean time, I'm assuming your EC score wasn't exceptionally high either. That being said, ECs are an area where improvement isn't overly difficult. Ask for some feedback on your essay, adjust it accordingly, and pick up some more volunteering work during the next year (or however many more until you apply again). 

 

A few friends of mine who got rejected after their undergrad but accepted this cycle after finishing their Masters had similar scores (in the 60s) the first time around. 

 

Don't give up! You can do this. You spent years working hard to even just get the interview. You can make this final push, I guarantee it.

 

Thank you! My ECs was like 21.5, so just about 1.5 points behind the average which isn't bad. I'll be finishing my Masters before the next application and have already started a few new jobs/volunteer positions since the application was due in September. I'm thinking that section will be okay. I'm definitely going to ask for some specific feedback on the essay - do they give it to you? I've heard from friends that the feedback appointments are very general, but it would be great if they could give some concrete suggestions! Now just to write the new MCAT and be on my way with applying again. Thanks for the support! 

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My score this year was 65.45 and seeing as the average IP accepted score was ~74, I'm wondering if it is even possible for me to get near close to that by next year? It's hard not to self doubt. For any of you who were rejected in the past, did you find that focusing on your weaknesses really improved your scores over the year? For me, it's the interview that I'll need to work on (26/40).

 

I'm in the same boat as you, and I'd say it's definitely possible to improve enough in a year to gain acceptance. I'd second the feedback appointment, they'll be able to go over your supplemental and say where they'd like to see you add more activities. As for the interview, start prepping slightly earlier by keeping up with medical news and practicing your answer structure. My interview score was slighter higher than yours (31), but I still feel like if I could make my answers just sound a little more put together, I'd see a higher score next time around. It's possible!

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I'd echo everyone's feedback. You can do it!

 

- MMI is a skill that *significantly* improves with practice. Since you are IP, start practicing for MMI now. You will develop confidence and can boost your score up by several points by Nov.

- As stated previously, schedule an appointment with Dal to go over your application. Make a list of questions to ask beforehand on your scores, experiences and what change they'd recommend. They are very helpful. Make notes during the meeting and understand what your weak areas and make changes appropriately. This exercise will boost up your points as well. 

 

Good luck! 

Did you get into Dal?

If so, do you mind sharing your stats ... GPA? MCAT? Interview? IP/OOP status? Extracurriculars etc.

Also, did you join any MMI practice groups?

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks yeghz!

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On 3/22/2016 at 3:51 PM, mt2120 said:

Did you get into Dal?

If so, do you mind sharing your stats ... GPA? MCAT? Interview? IP/OOP status? Extracurriculars etc.

Also, did you join any MMI practice groups?

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks yeghz!

 

I did. My stats:

 

Accepted; It still hasn't hit me yet!

 

NS (IP)

Extracurriculars: 3 publications, public health background, multiple global health experiences, student governance and leadership, plenty of research assistant jobs, awards etc. Worked really hard on my essay and reviewed it plenty of times.

MMI: Felt confident but this was my strongest score in my first two tries so I knew what worked for me. The questions were very fair.

 

My 2 cents to applications/re-applicants:

- Low GPA can be an uphill battle but working on the other sections can change the tide in your favor!

- While it is very important be have strong ECs on all the application sections, how you describe those activities is KEY! This is what got me on my second try. On my third, I asked several people to read them, revised and clearly articulated the link to the application section and the career of medicine (within reason ofc). 

- Asked friends, colleagues and mentors to review application. Frankly, I did not do this in my first two tries and I regret it. It is very insightful to have a fresh pair of eyes to look at your responses and you'd be surprised how much your answers can be improved. Ofc this means planning ahead but if you are applying this year, start now and you are ahead of the game!

- MMI: Consistent practicing made all the difference for me! I practiced for over 6 months with 20+ people on skype/in person of people applying to different schools. 

 

Things that worked for me -- I made notes, grouped key talking points for topic areas, listed keywords that would highlight skills of a physician (ex- empathy, critically evaluate, safe spaces etc), attended mock MMI sessions (free) in the university and consistently practiced. When I found that someone had an interviewing skill set I could learn from, I practiced with them several times; taught them what I did well in and learned back from them! This process worked really well for me and I made some great friends along the way! 

 

I normally follow news and am keen about public health/medicine in general hence keeping up-to-date about news was not an issue but I practiced my critical thinking by listening to White Coat Black Art and other stuff but, WCBA is gold! 

 

Having practiced with several people I learned that good MMI answers are not just about content but also delivery. If you had a low MMI score this year, think about how you organize your answers. Is you interviewer able to follow you? Do you set the stage for your answer by listing key points and then getting into details? Do you add some personal experience to give your interviewer something to remember you by? Do you make a summary statement to close? Do you leave 2 mins for follow-up qsns? 

-- I am not sure if this is 'right' but these are elements that worked for me.

 

In short, I have been there and understand that (re)applying can be very intimidating/disheartening. There is some very valuable advice on this thread. If medicine is your passion, stay persistent and continue to build, learn and grow. Plan ahead. Reflect on what worked and what didn't. Talk to friends, mentors etc; people are always willing to help! 

 

Given my experience, I strongly feel that admissions committee evaluates applicants as a whole. Low GPA is NOT a deal breaker. 

 

Wishing you all the best and if I can help, feel free to PM me. 

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NS waitlisted with a score of 69.45

 

I'm thinking I might be on the lower end of the wait list?

Definitely have some stuff to improve on but I can't not be excited about the chance that it could turn into an acceptance!

 

1st time applicant

 

I don't think there is any way to know exactly where you are on the waitlist. I was rejected last year and when I had my feedback call from admissions, they mentioned that the real scores come from the z-scores (my understanding was in each category separately). Depending on your z-score in various categories (the 35 points is actually made out of 6 categories), a person with a score of 70 could be higher on the waitlist than someone with a score of 72. 

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Hey thats great! Why did you decline and if you dont mind what was your final score? :)

 

For anyone on the NB waitlist, I just declined an acceptance off the waitlist so there's definitely already been some movement :)

Good luck everyone!

 

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Hey thats great! Why did you decline and if you dont mind what was your final score? :)

 

My final score was 67.34! I was accepted at MUN so I'm currently deciding between that and another program entirely (it's complicated haha). Good luck!

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Accepted off OOP waitlist! Non-trad.

GPA: 4.0
MCAT: PS 10 VR 13 BS 10 (wrote the new MCAT as well but after the deadline)
ECs: Non-trad stuff, PM for details
Interview: Not the best, IMO. Did well on 3-4, poorly on at least 2, and probably about average on the rest. 

 

Incredibly grateful to Dal for offering this opportunity and for a well organized and warm interview weekend. Have declined the offer to accept at an ON school.

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Could someone explain how people last year knew their "score" - made up of interview, ECs, MCAT, GPA, etc.? Was this information emailed to them in their accepted/rejected/waitlisted letters?

 

After the interview stage, should we be able to log on and monitor our application? 

 

Thanks for the help!

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Could someone explain how people last year knew their "score" - made up of interview, ECs, MCAT, GPA, etc.? Was this information emailed to them in their accepted/rejected/waitlisted letters?

 

After the interview stage, should we be able to log on and monitor our application? 

 

Thanks for the help!

 

Yes they give you this information in your rejection letter.  Acceptance letters do not give your scores, but you will know the average scores for each of the sections. 

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Yes they give you this information in your rejection letter.  Acceptance letters do not give your scores, but you will know the average scores for each of the sections. 

 

Thanks! After the interview stage, should we be able to log on and monitor our application?

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Accepted: IP

 

GPA: 3.9
MCAT: 508
ECs: Lots of variety with involvement in university-related stuff and a decent amount of meaningful medical volunteer experience
Interview: Honestly just felt great being there- low stress the entire time- felt iffy about delivery at a few stations but walked away with a positive feeling- lucky to have some health professional friends who i bounced lots of ideas off in the weeks leading up to the int

 

​This hasn't really hit me yet- to those who didn't receive good news today, keep moving forward, best wishes

 

Edit: First time applicant

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Hey folks, 

 

Second cycle applying to Dal, and I'm so happy to say I've been accepted as an NB resident.

 

3.7 GPA (UG + PhD)

512 MCAT

Interview - To be honest, felt great during, but afterwards thinking about stuff, I was not optimistic at all.

ECs - Lot of solid research (publications + conferences), involvement with a children's oncology camp for the past 5 years, bunch of university-wide and some national committees.

 

It took a lot of hard work (and rejection) to get where I am today, so to those of you who didn't get the news you were hoping for, keep pushing.

 

To my new classmates - can't wait to meet you all!

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