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Hey everyone, just looking for some advice.

 

I really want to travel this summer for a bit, however I don't exactly have the finances to do so, my parents could probably spot me but honestly I hate asking for money and I have been financially independent since I left home in high school - so my plan is however this:

 

I was thinking of taking out a LoC and spending 5K on a trip 2-3 weeks. I received good news that I will be able to keep my job while I am in medical school - pretty good paying and I can make my own hours. I was hoping to pay off my LoC as I work in medical school and just try to mitigate debt accrual on my loans.

 

For me I like to live life fullest and want to try to take advantage of this summer before medical school to see some of the world - something I havent really been able to do yet in my life besides the traveling I did for competitive soccer. Thus, I feel like it would be worth it to bite the bullet and spend a little, however, I feel like I shouldnt just feel that I can spend a little bit more money since I got into medical school.

 

Such conflicting ideas/thoughts, wondering if anyone else could chime in.

 

Thank you!

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Hey everyone, just looking for some advice.

 

I really want to travel this summer for a bit, however I don't exactly have the finances to do so, my parents could probably spot me but honestly I hate asking for money and I have been financially independent since I left home in high school - so my plan is however this:

 

I was thinking of taking out a LoC and spending 5K on a trip 2-3 weeks. I received good news that I will be able to keep my job while I am in medical school - pretty good paying and I can make my own hours. I was hoping to pay off my LoC as I work in medical school and just try to mitigate debt accrual on my loans.

 

For me I like to live life fullest and want to try to take advantage of this summer before medical school to see some of the world - something I havent really been able to do yet in my life besides the traveling I did for competitive soccer. Thus, I feel like it would be worth it to bite the bullet and spend a little, however, I feel like I shouldnt just feel that I can spend a little bit more money since I got into medical school.

 

Such conflicting ideas/thoughts, wondering if anyone else could chime in.

 

Thank you!

 

Go and be free.

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Thanks - I was genuinely curious. I would hope that such a plan does go ahead (because they are correct that doctor shortage is a real issue) but only with a comprehensive plan to increase residency spots that is developed in conjunction with UBC, the college, and currently working doctors.

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Thanks - I was genuinely curious. I would hope that such a plan does go ahead (because they are correct that doctor shortage is a real issue) but only with a comprehensive plan to increase residency spots that is developed in conjunction with UBC, the college, and currently working doctors.

 

I just don't realistically see how they are just going to add 100+ residency spots. And if they add medical spots without adding residency spots, then there isn't going to be an increase in practicing doctors.

 

This seems like a ludicrous, unattainable goal set up by a group of politicians who are simply trying to appease the public without any real plan in place.

 

If they can somehow make that work then hats off to them, but I would be really surprised to say the least.

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Thanks - I was genuinely curious. I would hope that such a plan does go ahead (because they are correct that doctor shortage is a real issue) but only with a comprehensive plan to increase residency spots that is developed in conjunction with UBC, the college, and currently working doctors.

 

also going to be interesting if say they tailor any created residency spots to just family medicine (again following the pressure). Not surprising just increasing medical school spots doesn't equate to an equal number of people wanting specifically family medicine. It can skew the relatively competitiveness of things. 

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Feeling pretty damn lucky.

 

I've been on this forum, watching people share their struggles, successes, and setbacks. 2 years ago I was inspired to try to chase my pipe dream of medicine after starting a successful career in nursing.

 

I was discouraged by people saying it was nearly impossible succeed on the MCAT without formal education in the required sciences, and by my relatively low GPA. I spent the next two years pursuing open studies to remedy my GPA, and self studying for the MCAT.

 

After the long process of exam writing, applying, and working and going to school, I was admitted to medical school. I found these forums a safe place to seek help, and advice, while concurrently gaining insight by reading about others.

 

I would say to those who are older, and uncertain, and facing self doubt - pack it up, box it, put it aside and try. You don't win the lotto without buying a ticket, and you don't get in to medicine without trying.

 

I'm writing this, not to gloat, but to share my story, and hopefully encourage others not to give up on dreams.

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Feeling pretty damn lucky.

 

I've been on this forum, watching people share their struggles, successes, and setbacks. 2 years ago I was inspired to try to chase my pipe dream of medicine after starting a successful career in nursing.

 

I was discouraged by people saying it was nearly impossible succeed on the MCAT without formal education in the required sciences, and by my relatively low GPA. I spent the next two years pursuing open studies to remedy my GPA, and self studying for the MCAT.

 

After the long process of exam writing, applying, and working and going to school, I was admitted to medical school. I found these forums a safe place to seek help, and advice, while concurrently gaining insight by reading about others.

 

I would say to those who are older, and uncertain, and facing self doubt - pack it up, box it, put it aside and try. You don't win the lotto without buying a ticket, and you don't get in to medicine without trying.

 

I'm writing this, not to gloat, but to share my story, and hopefully encourage others not to give up on dreams.

 

ha hey, congratulations :) Feel free to post in the non trad thread if you like on your story. 

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Not very impressed with the Ottawa Civic Hospital right now.  Yesterday my dad had a stroke, IN the hospital, but because the nurse caring for him was new, she didn't realize that it was NOT normal for him to have a drooping face on one side, to not be able to move his right side at all, and to not be able to talk coherently.  Despite us telling her this was NOT normal for him.  Finally, a medical student came to check on him and we told her it was NOT normal for him.  Four hours after we think he had the stroke (we think we know the time because the nurse told us he fell out of his chair at that time) he was FINALLY evaluated by a neurology resident and sent for a CT scan.  So it was almost too late to give him the tPA by the time they could confirm he had had a stroke.  So likely he'll have more permanent damage than he might have otherwise if only we had been listened to, or if the nurse had been more aware of stroke symptoms (how can a nurse NOT be aware???)  Of course, he may not even make it at this point, given we were told that the first three days after a stroke and tPA administration are critical periods.

 

The only good thing was that once the neurology resident called the stroke code, things went into action very quickly.  But up until that point, no one seemed concerned at all.  Despite the fact that my dad was in a lot of pain and clearly unable to communicate (despite being very lucid and communicating the night before - but with a different nurse on duty).  Still, very frustrating that it took so long!  I guess it's a bad idea to fall ill on a long weekend.

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Sorry to hear this. You tried your best to advocate. Unfortunately, stroke treatment can be more delayed when it occurs in the hospital, rather than being in the community where the family would have just called 911.

Officially, the patient voice is recognized - hopefully there will be more education on stroke symptoms and improved ability for family concerns to activate the stroke code:

https://www.ottawahospital.on.ca/wps/portal/Base/TheHospital/QualityAndSafety

Hope your dad pulls through with a minimum of permanent damage.

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I'm so very sorry to hear that. I really hope your dad does well and recovers without deficits. That sounds very frightening and frustrating to experience as a family member. I hope you guys have people supporting you as well right now, as your family deals with this. 

 

This is absolutely the sort of experience that needs to be brought to the attention of hospital patient feedback pathways. Hopefully when things settle down, that's something you might consider doing so that this sort of thing can be avoided in the future. 

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Thanks Lactic Folly and Birdy. I have to say, now that he's in the NACU, his care is exceptional. Amazing staff all around, from the orderlies to the nurses to the physiotherapists. What a contrast with general medicine. Of course we aren't happy that he is in the NACU, but they do take wonderful care of the patients there. Thankfully my dad is having an easier time talking today and can move his right leg a bit, although he still can't move his right arm. He is still rather confused and thinks he lives in the city where he grew up (not Ottawa) but we are seeing some improvement. And as a dietitian I approve of the enteral feeding regimen he is on. The SLP comes tomorrow to see if he can be transitioned to foods (even if puréed).

 

I'm having to head home today (fortunately we are only a few hours from Ottawa) but my mother and sister will still be able to visit him this week, and I'll be back next weekend, wherever he is at that point. I'm just glad that, as a health care professional, I'm able to provide my mom and my sister with some reassurance, as I understand a lot of what's going on, and what they shouldn't be pressured into doing (i.e. They don't have to take the first LTC spot that's available if that's what determined my dad needs upon discharge).

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Feeling pretty damn lucky.

 

I've been on this forum, watching people share their struggles, successes, and setbacks. 2 years ago I was inspired to try to chase my pipe dream of medicine after starting a successful career in nursing.

 

I was discouraged by people saying it was nearly impossible succeed on the MCAT without formal education in the required sciences, and by my relatively low GPA. I spent the next two years pursuing open studies to remedy my GPA, and self studying for the MCAT.

 

After the long process of exam writing, applying, and working and going to school, I was admitted to medical school. I found these forums a safe place to seek help, and advice, while concurrently gaining insight by reading about others.

 

I would say to those who are older, and uncertain, and facing self doubt - pack it up, box it, put it aside and try. You don't win the lotto without buying a ticket, and you don't get in to medicine without trying.

 

I'm writing this, not to gloat, but to share my story, and hopefully encourage others not to give up on dreams.

Good for you - always great to hear these stories and I agree these forums can be wonderful safe places for advice :-)

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Well, I remain rather unimpressed with the Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus.  The staff in the NACU were amazing, but all the other departments/floors seem to have staff that really don't care about their work and show very little empathy.  My father was supposed to have surgery this morning at 8am, and while I realize that emergencies take priority, he still hasn't been prepped for surgery, but he's naturally had to fast all day.  So he is hungry, frustrated, and continues to be confused.  He also fell out of his bed, again, when they were supposed to arrange things so that he didn't have another fall.

I understand that people work long hours, and that there are too many patients for too few staff.  But it would be nice to see people taking just a little bit of care and having a bit of empathy.

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On 2017-5-21 at 5:44 PM, NutritionRunner said:

Not very impressed with the Ottawa Civic Hospital right now.  Yesterday my dad had a stroke, IN the hospital, but because the nurse caring for him was new, she didn't realize that it was NOT normal for him to have a drooping face on one side, to not be able to move his right side at all, and to not be able to talk coherently.  Despite us telling her this was NOT normal for him.  Finally, a medical student came to check on him and we told her it was NOT normal for him.  Four hours after we think he had the stroke (we think we know the time because the nurse told us he fell out of his chair at that time) he was FINALLY evaluated by a neurology resident and sent for a CT scan.  So it was almost too late to give him the tPA by the time they could confirm he had had a stroke.  So likely he'll have more permanent damage than he might have otherwise if only we had been listened to, or if the nurse had been more aware of stroke symptoms (how can a nurse NOT be aware???)  Of course, he may not even make it at this point, given we were told that the first three days after a stroke and tPA administration are critical periods.

 

The only good thing was that once the neurology resident called the stroke code, things went into action very quickly.  But up until that point, no one seemed concerned at all.  Despite the fact that my dad was in a lot of pain and clearly unable to communicate (despite being very lucid and communicating the night before - but with a different nurse on duty).  Still, very frustrating that it took so long!  I guess it's a bad idea to fall ill on a long weekend.

Sorry to hear about your Dad.

I don't know the full details of why he was admitted in the hospital in the first place but are you planning on sueing the hospital ?

I am not a stroke expert but presumably the earlier the initiation of rtPA the better the outcome. 

Of course the most important thing right now is for him to make it, it's just that I have recently written a post in the lounge called "Do we really care about patients" and your example just seems classical. I wouldn't be surprised that the reason why he is getting exceptional care now is because he was neglected earlier and they are worried about the possibility being sued.

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21 hours ago, SEAL said:

Sorry to hear about your Dad.

I don't know the full details of why he was admitted in the hospital in the first place but are you planning on sueing the hospital ?

I am not a stroke expert but presumably the earlier the initiation of rtPA the better the outcome. 

Of course the most important thing right now is for him to make it, it's just that I have recently written a post in the lounge called "Do we really care about patients" and your example just seems classical. I wouldn't be surprised that the reason why he is getting exceptional care now is because he was neglected earlier and they are worried about the possibility being sued.

These cases of neglect happen way too often; It is very sad and unfortunate ----> and something has to be done about it. Few weeks ago, my dad had to do a biopsy and he had to get IV antibiotics for about 30 mins before the surgery ( the standard protocol).  However, the doctors were in a rush and decided to only give my dad the IV injections for 10 mins and start the surgery. B/c of docs lack of care, my dad developed sepsis, which was quite serious. He finally recovered but he stayed in the hospital for over a week.  It was also a totally avoidable mistake. 

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Just now, End Poverty said:

These cases of neglect happen way too often; It is very sad and unfortunate ----> and something has to be done about it. Few weeks ago, my dad had to do a biopsy and he had to get IV antibiotics for about 30 mins before the surgery ( the standard protocol).  However, the doctors were in a rush and decided to only give my dad the IV injections for 10 mins and start the surgery. B/c of docs lack of care, my dad developed sepsis, which was quite serious. He finally recovered but he stayed in the hospital for over a week.  It was also a totally avoidable mistake. 

What ! That is not a misdiagnosis, that's intentional negligience ! Please tell me you guys plan to sue ! This is ridiculous !

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