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Chiropractice Scope

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Guest Physioprospect

I am just curious if anyone knows anything about chiropractic scope of practice and their skill set compared to an FCAMPT trained physio? I feel like some of the time the public thinks they are superior due to the fact they call themselves Dr.? Any insight would be awesome.

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i consider physios superior to chiropractors.

 

 

imo they don't rlly do anything...

 

think spine/headache

 

lots of hands-on work (massage, manipulating joints beyond physiological limit aka "paraphysiologic space")

 

the chiropractic college isn't even associated with a university...so idk if they even deserve the "dr" title...

 

i didnt know a doctorate degree was that easy to attain

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Not sure what an FCAMPT-trained physio is, unless you're talking about manual therapy. Chiropractors are only seen as higher on the scale when they boast about the amount of money the very select 2% make that's equal to a GP wage. Most of them make less than a regular physio or equal to it. Another reason the public may see chiropractors as higher is because these sessions are much nicer for the patients themselves. You go in, you lie down, someone pokes or cracks your back, and you're out. In physio, there's so much more included (massage, manual therapy, IFC, ultrasound, exercises) etc. that many patients don't favour their physios over their chiros all the time just because the physios tend to push them more to do their exercises and get better themselves.:P

 

Chiros can only call themselves Doctors of chiropractic medicine. It's the same as any other Ph.D sort of degree, like how a nurse with a Ph.D can call themselves a Doctor of Nursing.

 

In general, if you ask around the public will be pretty equal in terms of these professions because they really just don't know everything that each of them does unless they have experience working with them. Now if you ask the medical community, physios win hands down. Chiropractors are seen very badly by doctors, nurses, anybody really in the medical community, mainly for their reputation of high velocity, high frequency (whatever it's called where they rip your back to crack it that can cause strokes) techniques. They're also seen badly because of how they try to expand outside of their scope of practice. Meaning, they try to treat things like asthma with their nerve re-alignment.

 

Were you thinking of going a chiropractor route over physio or just curious of their relationship only:confused:

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Chiros can only call themselves Doctors of chiropractic medicine. It's the same as any other Ph.D sort of degree, like how a nurse with a Ph.D can call themselves a Doctor of Nursing.

 

Actually, under the regulated health professions acts, chiropractors are entitled to use the title "Doctor" (at least in Ontario).

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Actually, under the regulated health professions acts, chiropractors are entitled to use the title "Doctor" (at least in Ontario).

 

Yes, as I explained before they are a type of doctor. Anyone with that status or Ph.D can call themselves a "doctor". I was moreso referring to the fact that it's a doctor of chiropractic medicine, they cannot call themselves a "doctor of medicine" or "medical doctor" because those titles are reserved for M.D's.

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Guest Physioprospect

Im currently in PT school, its just that my friend has had some awesome results lately going to a chiro and Im getting discouraged with how much neuro, cardio rehab we have to learn as well as some MSK, where as I would think chiro would focus way more directly on MSK and have a better skillset.

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Yes, as I explained before they are a type of doctor. Anyone with that status or Ph.D can call themselves a "doctor". I was moreso referring to the fact that it's a doctor of chiropractic medicine, they cannot call themselves a "doctor of medicine" or "medical doctor" because those titles are reserved for M.D's.

 

A PhD can call themselves doctors only in academic settings... they can't do so in clinical settings. A chiro can!

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i consider physios superior to chiropractors.

 

 

imo they don't rlly do anything...

 

think spine/headache

 

lots of hands-on work (massage, manipulating joints beyond physiological limit aka "paraphysiologic space")

 

the chiropractic college isn't even associated with a university...so idk if they even deserve the "dr" title...

 

i didnt know a doctorate degree was that easy to attain

 

My experience with my chiro was actually very pleasant. I have scoliosis and after going to the chiro for a few times, my posture was significantly more straight, and my specialist even vouched for it. I went to a physio as well, but they made my back hurt even more and eventually I had to stop going to them. Of course this is only my own opinion but I think chiros can be very useful and should be on par with physios

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Okay well if you want to get super, super technical, yes a chiropractor, a physician, a nurse, a specialist, etc.etc. anyone who's working in their scope of practice can call themselves a doctor in those settings. Wherever you earn your doctorate, you can call yourself a "doctor", it's not a reserved title or fought over.

 

As for the whole physio vs. chiro debate, you will find good and bad physios/chiros everywhere. I would say you're more likely to find more chiros that are worse, but that's just my opinion based on the fact that chiro school is much easier to get into and spews out more students every year than there is demand. If you're thinking of switching over, I would seriously consider the job implications and training required before making a move. To study chiropractic medicine is very similar to medicine in many ways and the amount of depth you will go into may far surpass physio training in different levels (it will focus even more on MSK, nerves, but less rehabilitation or cardio i would assume). They are heavy on the nerve training as they're all connected to the spinal cord.

 

Did your friend choose chiro over physio specifically? Both of them can achieve many of the same results if done properly, just in a different fashion.

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Okay well if you want to get super, super technical, yes a chiropractor, a physician, a nurse, a specialist, etc.etc. anyone who's working in their scope of practice can call themselves a doctor in those settings. Wherever you earn your doctorate, you can call yourself a "doctor", it's not a reserved title or fought over.

 

Restriction of title “doctor”

 

33. (1) Except as allowed in the regulations under this Act, no person shall use the title “doctor”, a variation or abbreviation or an equivalent in another language in the course of providing or offering to provide, in Ontario, health care to individuals. 1991, c. 18, s. 33 (1).

 

Note: On a day to be named by proclamation of the Lieutenant Governor, section 33 is amended by the Statutes of Ontario, 2007, chapter 10, Schedule P, subsection 20 (1) by adding the following subsections:

 

Same

 

(1.1) Subsection (1) does not apply to a person who is a member of the College of Naturopaths of Ontario. 2007, c. 10, Sched. P, s. 20 (1).

 

Naturopathic doctor

 

(1.2) A member referred to in subsection (1.1) shall not use the title “doctor” in written format without using the phrase, “naturopathic doctor”, immediately following his or her name. 2007, c. 10, Sched. P, s. 20 (1).

 

See: 2007, c. 10, Sched. P, ss. 20 (1), 21 (2).

 

Idem

 

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a person who is a member of,

 

(a) the College of Chiropractors of Ontario;

 

(B) the College of Optometrists of Ontario;

 

© the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario;

 

(d) the College of Psychologists of Ontario; or

 

(e) the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario. 1991, c. 18, s. 33 (2).

 

 

For more information, refer to the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 >>> http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/html/statutes/english/elaws_statutes_91r18_e.htm#BK30

 

 

So, the title "Doctor" is restricted to chiro's, optometrists, medical doctors (physicians and surgeons), psychologists and dentists. A nurse can NOT call herself a doctor when providing health care.

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Although I don't know much, I would assume that chiros have a little bit more freedom in terms of manipulation around the spine (which I don't think physios can do).

 

As of chiros vs. pt - it depends. There are horrible PT/chiros out there some which I've experienced first hand. Chiros definitely have top notch education (once again, its what you do with it). Chiros are also not restricted to just manipulations, they are also able to use active release therapy (ART) etc. Don't think all chiros are quack (they might be down in USA); however, CMCC is highly evident based from what I heard.

 

In terms of scope, I would research whether chiros are able to prescribe energy applications like electrotherapy/ultra sound/laser etc. I know PTs can do it but I am not sure about chiros.

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The Chiro I knew could do ultrasound and light therapy. CMCC actually does a VERY good job at educating future chiropractors - I have heard many good reviews of its teaching styles and learning methods. They took out the high velocity, high whatever it is that had and still has many physicians skeptical about chiro practice. It's not taught at CMCC, which is what makes a huge difference in the chiropractors they put out. Some chiros can be quite the quack, here or in the US unfortunately, and it gives a really bad name to the profession. It only takes one cracked back to paraplegic or one person saying they can cure everything by poking you with an instrument for the entire medical industry to conclude your profession is quackery.

 

And yes, chiros have more freedom for manipulation. They are supposedly THE experts in it, especially around the spine. Physios are more for muscles and strength, not so much your back and the bones.

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Guest Physioprospect

Physios can do every manipulation a chiro can do if they pursue post graduate mannual therapy training.

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