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Accepted into dentistry school in Australia...undecided, need some advice.

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There are students that don't get in with the requirements that the dental school is asking for. I had a friend who had a 88% average for UWO and competitive DAT score and interview who was waitlisted but in the end didn't get into Schulich. There really is no difference between 88% and 90%. If you wanna talk GPA ya 0.1 difference but in the end it DOES NOT MATTER.

 

There are A LOT of qualified students that fail to gain a spot in the dental schools every year in Canada and if they do decide to go to Australia you label them as 2nd tier?

 

What about the states? If someone got into the states let's say NYU or Boston but didn't get accepted here will you also say they are 2nd tier? I don't think so.

 

To the OP: I think it's great that you have an acceptance from an Australian dental school. I think the ultimate choice is up to you whether you want to go or not. You have to dig deep down and ask yourself if this is what you want to do and whether you're ready for it.

 

*Sigh* we're talking cohorts, here, not individuals, but the reality is that people often don't have much individual information to go by.

 

And ya, I've seen it happen often that someone went to the states (e.g. NYU) because they didn't get in applying to Canada. You could have an excellent student and later excellent dentist come out of say, UBC or NYU, but with the UBC student you can give them a larger benefit of a doubt because they already passed through a tighter filter.

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*Sigh* we're talking cohorts, here, not individuals, but the reality is that people often don't have much individual information to go by.

 

And ya, I've seen it happen often that someone went to the states (e.g. NYU) because they didn't get in applying to Canada. You could have an excellent student and later excellent dentist come out of say, UBC or NYU, but with the UBC student you can give them a larger benefit of a doubt because they already passed through a tighter filter.

 

so are you saying you would trust a student that graduated from UBC more than a student that graduated from an Australian dental school or US dental school?

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so are you saying you would trust a student that graduated from UBC more than a student that graduated from an Australian dental school or US dental school?

 

Are you in Aussie dental school?

 

Why speaks so highly of Australian dental school in Canadian dental forum?

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so are you saying you would trust a student that graduated from UBC more than a student that graduated from an Australian dental school or US dental school?

 

I'm saying that without any other distinguishing factors I would hire the UBC student over the others.

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Are you in Aussie dental school?

 

Why speaks so highly of Australian dental school in Canadian dental forum?

 

no i'm not. I'm hating the bias here, what do you mean i speak "highly" of Australian dental schools? I'm starting to think that a lot of people on this forum is very tunnel visioned. Never did I say an Australian school is better or worst i'm simply saying they are equivalent when students graduate from them so you should treat them the same.

 

 

 

I'm saying that without any other distinguishing factors I would hire the UBC student over the others.

 

Why? Simply because you think the student from UBC will be a "better" dentist? Just because they graduated from a Canadian school? I really hope your opinion changes because carrying this type of bias heading into a school in Canada will give you a boost in ego which may in fact impact your career when you do meet doctors or dentist that have studied else where. Thinking that you are superior to them may cause problems further down the line for you

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*Sigh* we're talking cohorts, here, not individuals, but the reality is that people often don't have much individual information to go by.

 

And ya, I've seen it happen often that someone went to the states (e.g. NYU) because they didn't get in applying to Canada. You could have an excellent student and later excellent dentist come out of say, UBC or NYU, but with the UBC student you can give them a larger benefit of a doubt because they already passed through a tighter filter.

 

You just proved my point of thinking that graduates from Canada are "better" when they are not. They are equal.

I just want to add that the Vice-Dean of Schulich which is this guy http://brucegreydental.com/about-us/our-team/ got his dental degree from India first

and now is the vice-dean of Schulich. Would you not hire him? Just because he went to a foreign dental school?

 

See above, I'm not gonna bother repeating myself if you can't read.

 

Another thing, if you're gonna insult me and tell me that I can't read then you gotta go and open your tunnel visioned eyes.

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You just proved my point of thinking that graduates from Canada are "better" when they are not. They are equal.

 

 

 

Actually no. We Canadians have to earn an UG degree before dental school thus, making us more rounded/rewarding us better critical skills. IMO.

 

no brock,

 

earning an undergrad degree before dental school doesn't mean anything. Yes it teaches you some courses and basics that are related to dentistry or medicine but it doesn't mean you'll be a better dentist in the long run

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You just proved my point of thinking that graduates from Canada are "better" when they are not. They are equal.

I just want to add that the Vice-Dean of Schulich which is this guy http://brucegreydental.com/about-us/our-team/ got his dental degree from India first

and now is the vice-dean of Schulich. Would you not hire him? Just because he went to a foreign dental school?

 

 

 

Another thing, if you're gonna insult me and tell me that I can't read then you gotta go and open your tunnel visioned eyes.

1. I never once said "better". I said they passed through a tighter filter.

2. We're talking about Canadians, which as far as I can tell he was not at the time

3. Again, cohorts, not individuals. See earlier posts.

 

I'm finishing here.

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Speaking as a graduate of UofT dentistry, I can say that UofT produces terrible dentists. There are definitely academically easier school that graduate better prepared clinicians.

 

I have heard similar things from uoft grads.

One grad specialized in ny and said that you can get a way better clinical experience down south.

It is tougher to get into Canadian schools, but the US has tougher boards and requires FTDs to complete 2 yr programs. Clearly the US has a higher standard in dentistry compared to Canada who will let anyone practice dentistry.

 

Maybe if I was really naive or something I would only go to US trained dentists. Good thing I am not in highschool though.

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1. I never once said "better". I said they passed through a tighter filter.

2. We're talking about Canadians, which as far as I can tell he was not at the time

3. Again, cohorts, not individuals. See earlier posts.

 

I'm finishing here.

 

that "tighter filter" is only because the number of seats are so low in Canada.

It doesn't necessary produce better dentists.

 

And again I get it you're saying overall you trust canadian grads better and again i'm saying aussie grads and canadian grads are just as equally good

stop with the bias

 

i'm done here

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that "tighter filter" is only because the number of seats are so low in Canada.

It doesn't necessary produce better dentists.

 

And again I get it you're saying overall you trust canadian grads better and again i'm saying aussie grads and canadian grads are just as equally good

stop with the bias

 

i'm done here

 

I think your opinion depends on where you live. Canada lets any foreign dentist challenge the boards without a qualifying program now. They used to have it, just like the US. Technically, since Canada has this open policy, the cheapest thing to do would be to go to dental school in some third world country and try to pass the NDEB exam. Frankly, I think Canada's accredation of Aus schools doesn't mean much, especially because of this recently implemented open policy.

 

I'm sure if you lived in the States, where the ADA does not see Australian grads as equal, you would have a very different opinion on AUS schools. The guys on SDN would not be favourable towards AUS schools. At all.

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I think your opinion depends on where you live. Canada lets any foreign dentist challenge the boards without a qualifying program now. They used to have it, just like the US. Technically, since Canada has this open policy, the cheapest thing to do would be to go to dental school in some third world country and try to pass the NDEB exam. Frankly, I think Canada's accredation of Aus schools doesn't mean much, especially because of this recently implemented open policy.

 

I'm sure if you lived in the States, where the ADA does not see Australian grads as equal, you would have a very different opinion on AUS schools. The guys on SDN would not be favourable towards AUS schools. At all.

 

That's not entirely accurate as it's not really "open". Graduates from non-accredited programs have added hurdles (assessment of clinical skills and assessment of clinical judgement). NDEB cannot be challenged until those components are passed.

 

http://www.ndeb.ca/nonaccredited

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the discussion is getting messy from a bunch of non-dentist talking as if they already experienced dentists...

 

To the OP, check the school's curriculum. Five-year dental program should have 3 full years of clinical experience. One extra clinical year gives you a lot more exposures and experiences comparing to a four year program. You will be more confident (relatively) right after you graduate by having more clinical experiences. That is actually a plus side of attending a five year program.

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It's this simple:

 

I have friends studying from both US and AUS dentals

And I myself will be attending us dental this coming year.

So i have done lot of research in this area

 

Level of Competency and requirement is ABOUT THE SAME !!!

So getting into US dentals doesn't mean you are better candidate as dentist!!!!

 

HOWEVER!!

 

Thinking about Specialization? , go US

 

Want good connections? go US

 

Want to work in US ? go US

 

Want reputation? go US

 

 

 

IF you have very good gpa: GO CANADA

 

IF you have okay gpa : go US

 

 

If you can get into AUS, you can get into US as well.

 

You got into AUS, but not in US this year??

Wait and Reapply US next year. Taking extra years to get into US instead of AUS is worth it.

 

I'm not saying AUS dentals are bad. It's just that there are alot more opportunities if you go to US/Canada, and there are things you have to risk when you go to AUS

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From a previous thread, apparently quite a lot of Canadians actually end up staying in Australia after dental school for various reasons. Some reasons listed included finding an Australian partner/spouse, getting used to the more "laid back" slower lifestyle, nicer weather, beautiful place to be all in all. I don't think anyone could deny that Australia would be a great place to live and work as a dentist, but as for shelling out 350k and going there for dental school just to come back to Canada...when you could've easily went to the States in the first place... really doesn't seem like a good idea to me.

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Wow, well this thread was completely derailed. You all are so passionate in comparing the prestige of attending CAN/US/AUS dentistry schools....yet do you even really know WHY you want to become a dentist in the first place? That is what I was interested in knowing...

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Wow, well this thread was completely derailed. You all are so passionate in comparing the career path ease/difficulty of attending CAN/US/AUS dentistry schools....yet do you even really know WHY you want to become a dentist in the first place? That is what I was interested in knowing...

 

Fixed that for you.

 

If you're in this for prestige, then fine we can talk about that, but don't misinterpret the discussion.

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It's this simple:

 

I have friends studying from both US and AUS dentals

And I myself will be attending us dental this coming year.

So i have done lot of research in this area

 

Level of Competency and requirement is ABOUT THE SAME !!!

So getting into US dentals doesn't mean you are better candidate as dentist!!!!

 

HOWEVER!!

 

Thinking about Specialization? , go US

 

Want good connections? go US

 

Want to work in US ? go US

 

Want reputation? go US

 

 

 

IF you have very good gpa: GO CANADA

 

IF you have okay gpa : go US

 

 

If you can get into AUS, you can get into US as well.

 

You got into AUS, but not in US this year??

Wait and Reapply US next year. Taking extra years to get into US instead of AUS is worth it.

 

I'm not saying AUS dentals are bad. It's just that there are alot more opportunities if you go to US/Canada, and there are things you have to risk when you go to AUS

 

good summary bro

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For OP and others in a similar situation:

 

If you're unsure about the profession being right for you and think you might even quit after a year, do not go through with it. The only way to pay off the debt after just one year is to eventually find an equivalent or higher-paying job.

 

I'm surprised that Griffith made it so easy for students to get in, even if they're international.

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