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Hi everyone,

 

With the admissions process rolling in, we thought that it might be a good time to share a personal student project that has been going on at McGill Medicine. FAMM, or Faces at McGill Medicine, is an initiative that initially aimed to bring students within 1 medical class at McGill together. However, it is now gradually expanding as new possibilities and ideas arise. We hope that the posts made on a regular basis can give you an idea of what medicine at McGill is all about. Feel free to check it out at https://www.facebook.com/facesatmcgillmedicine/.

 

All the best!

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If someone has an interview during the last year of a second undergraduate degree, must one continue taking a full course load and graduate if accepted, or will the acceptee be disqualified if he drops a course and/or does not graduate?

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If someone has an interview during the last year of a second undergraduate degree, must one continue taking a full course load and graduate if accepted, or will the acceptee be disqualified if he drops a course and/or does not graduate?

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Applicants may be considered on the basis of a second, subsequent undergraduate degree (minimum 60 credits). However, 45 consecutive graded credits (in a second/alternate bachelor's degree program) must be completed by the November 1 application deadline. The remaining 15 (or more) credits must be completed by July 31 of the year of entry to medical school, and these must be at a level comparable to that which appears in the academic records submitted at the time of application. A marked decline in academic performance in the final term(s) may lead to withdrawal of an offer of admission. Please note that the second degree must be conferred before the start of medical studies.

Sorry for my last post, my phone bugged and can't delete it, but apparently the website says you have to graduate before starting medical school

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Applicants may be considered on the basis of a second, subsequent undergraduate degree (minimum 60 credits). However, 45 consecutive graded credits (in a second/alternate bachelor's degree program) must be completed by the November 1 application deadline. The remaining 15 (or more) credits must be completed by July 31 of the year of entry to medical school, and these must be at a level comparable to that which appears in the academic records submitted at the time of application. A marked decline in academic performance in the final term(s) may lead to withdrawal of an offer of admission. Please note that the second degree must be conferred before the start of medical studies.

Sorry for my last post, my phone bugged and can't delete it, but apparently the website says you have to graduate before starting medical school

 

We'd go with this too, definitely! But if you want to confirm, feel free to reach out to the adcom!

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Students who were accepted in prior years, did you remember completely messing up a station or two but still end up getting in? Just had my interview and it went relatively well, 'cept for the last station. Somehow brain seemed to have completely shut down by the time I stepped in, so what came out of my mouth wasn't exactly quality stuff...  

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Students who were accepted in prior years, did you remember completely messing up a station or two but still end up getting in? Just had my interview and it went relatively well, 'cept for the last station. Somehow brain seemed to have completely shut down by the time I stepped in, so what came out of my mouth wasn't exactly quality stuff...  

short answer: yes. I firmly believe that I messed one of my stations in 2014

It's rare that someone would do super well in every single one of their stations.

Also: screwing up is a subjective thing. It might have actually been okay, or at least, not as bad as you thought it was.

Basically, right now, since you're done, you're in that limbo stage where you have no idea what's going to happen, where you are on a constant roller coaster. Try to not think about it, since there isn't anything you can do about it. What is done is done.

Be positive and cross your fingers :)

Good luck! 

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short answer: yes. I firmly believe that I messed one of my stations in 2014

It's rare that someone would do super well in every single one of their stations.

Also: screwing up is a subjective thing. It might have actually been okay, or at least, not as bad as you thought it was.

Basically, right now, since you're done, you're in that limbo stage where you have no idea what's going to happen, where you are on a constant roller coaster. Try to not think about it, since there isn't anything you can do about it. What is done is done.

Be positive and cross your fingers :)

Good luck! 

Only ..... one month left !!

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Based on previous years, when they say "the week of March 21st" do they actually post it then or is it like for the interviews where they said Jan 25 but some came Jan 21?

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Based on previous years, when they say "the week of March 21st" do they actually post it then or is it like for the interviews where they said Jan 25 but some came Jan 21?

Bro what they said on the interview is that we should not expect 21th March 7 am. I recall from experiences (second time applicant) that it can be delayed and I don't think it will be released earlier only later. Good luck man.

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Based on previous years, when they say "the week of March 21st" do they actually post it then or is it like for the interviews where they said Jan 25 but some came Jan 21?

Last year they said week of March 16 (I think) and they came out on the afternoon of that same day.

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Students who were accepted in prior years, did you remember completely messing up a station or two but still end up getting in? Just had my interview and it went relatively well, 'cept for the last station. Somehow brain seemed to have completely shut down by the time I stepped in, so what came out of my mouth wasn't exactly quality stuff...  

 

Definitely can still get in. This is part of the beauty of the MMIs. One station is not representative of the entire interview, so don't worry too much about it! 

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Based on previous years, when they say "the week of March 21st" do they actually post it then or is it like for the interviews where they said Jan 25 but some came Jan 21?

 

The adcom works really hard to get the results out to you as soon as possible. On some years it is unfortunately delayed, on some years the decision might even come out early. They'll generally have a better idea as the date approaches, so you can always confirm with them ahead of time should you wish to do so. 

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Hello!

 

First off, thank you so much for doing this.

 

I am currently a first year science student. My first semester grade (r score) was pretty good (or at least I'd like to think it is). However, cal 2 and french this semester are dragging my grades down. It's making me very stressful and I'm scared it'll affect my final grade and drag my overall r score down.

 

Do grades play the majority role in acceptance? Or if I have an "average" overall r score (like low 30s) but I am also involved in clubs and community (volunteering), would that increase my chance of acceptance?

 

Thanks!

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Hello!

 

First off, thank you so much for doing this.

 

I am currently a first year science student. My first semester grade (r score) was pretty good (or at least I'd like to think it is). However, cal 2 and french this semester are dragging my grades down. It's making me very stressful and I'm scared it'll affect my final grade and drag my overall r score down.

 

Do grades play the majority role in acceptance? Or if I have an "average" overall r score (like low 30s) but I am also involved in clubs and community (volunteering), would that increase my chance of acceptance?

 

Thanks!

 

If you take a look at the following page, you'll see that in order to get an interview for the med-p category, your R Score counts for 70% of the evaluation portfolio: https://www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions/applying/selection-process

 

We understand that CEGEP can be stressful, but do keep in mind that depending on how you do generally, 2 courses are not necessarily going to completely drag your R Score down. Besides, you do still have your 3rd semester to bring it back up.

 

Being involved in causes that you are passionate about and doing things that you like (for your own wellness!) is definitely important. After all, 30% of the initial evaluation of the candidate's profile comes from your CV/personal statement. Although we would encourage applicants to have a good academic profile in order to maximize chances of receiving an interview, we hope that this can reassure you in the sense that McGill cares for more than just grades.

 

2nd semester should be almost over, you can do this!

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Hello! Me again.

 

Next semester, I'm going to have to choose science option courses. Would it be advised to choose classes that interest me but that demand more work and are slightly harder, or to take the ones that are not too related to what I want to study later on, but are easier (to boost my r-score)?

 

Also, do you guys organize interview practice sessions kind of thing?

 

Thanks!

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Hello! Me again.

 

Next semester, I'm going to have to choose science option courses. Would it be advised to choose classes that interest me but that demand more work and are slightly harder, or to take the ones that are not too related to what I want to study later on, but are easier (to boost my r-score)?

 

Also, do you guys organize interview practice sessions kind of thing?

 

Thanks!

 

I think the answer to your question depends greatly on how you learn and study as a student in general. Some students take easier classes, which might help with grades and leave them with extra time to get involved in other things, while other students would prefer to take something that interest them - even though the class might prove to be difficult, they might feel like it is a better investment of their time. Try to balance your schedule, if you only take difficult classes that interest you, you might end up feeling burnt out and unmotivated to pursue anything else. On the other hand, if you only take easy classes that don't interest you, you might not end up enjoying these classes for the semesters to come anyways. 

 

As for practice interviews, we don't formally organize them, but come the time of interviews, plenty of people on this forum do. You can also try to organize some with your classmates and friends who might have applied to the same programs.

 

Hope this helps!

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I read on the site that successful applicants usually have an R score over 33.5 and that the average is around 35.2. Do you only look at the global average? or do you also look at the core class r-scores separately as well? For example, if my global average is low-mid thirties (over 33.5), but then if my core (science) classes r-scores are around 35, would that bring some kind of an advantage or not really?

 

Thank you!

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I read on the site that successful applicants usually have an R score over 33.5 and that the average is around 35.2. Do you only look at the global average? or do you also look at the core class r-scores separately as well? For example, if my global average is low-mid thirties (over 33.5), but then if my core (science) classes r-scores are around 35, would that bring some kind of an advantage or not really?

 

Thank you!

 

Pretty darn sure it doesn't make any difference. At least it doesn't for the French schools and I'm pretty sure it's the same at McGill.

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I read on the site that successful applicants usually have an R score over 33.5 and that the average is around 35.2. Do you only look at the global average? or do you also look at the core class r-scores separately as well? For example, if my global average is low-mid thirties (over 33.5), but then if my core (science) classes r-scores are around 35, would that bring some kind of an advantage or not really?

 

Thank you!

 

From our knowledge it is globally only. 

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