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We should also remember that a somewhat important proportion of the 75 applicants that will be admitted will refuse their place to go to a "french" university. (If I'm admitted to the 4 Quebec faculties, I will do that myself !) 

 

As a result, there will be more than 75 admitted at the end of the summer.

 

We must not lose faith !

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As an applicant for the MDCM stream this cycle, I can testify that the MMI was a lot of fun! And the best way is to be yourself (It's cheesy but very true in my case)

 

From my experience, I think the simulation centre can accomodate ~ 50 people/interview session. There are 2 interview sessions/day so that yields about 300 people/3 days of interview. 

 

Hope that helps!

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Then, they can clearly accommodate both MED-p and DENT-p applicants at the same time !

Don't forget that a certain number of ROQ-U IP applicants who will be interviewing as well. 

 

I've heard these claims a lot in the Anglo community, based on the increased presence of francophones in the program (which I think is true). I don't buy that there's any bias involved... The removal of the MCAT and changing demographics (more bilingual francophones than before) are the main reasons for the increase. People will invent conspiracy theories out of this.

 

Do it in the language you are MOST comfortable in. That is far more important, in my opinion.

 

Chacun voit midi a sa porte! It's kind of irritating to hear this, and I don't know if this is more specific to McGill than other schools but for some reasons everyone feels that they are discriminated against (Francophones, Anglophones and others)... 

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Hi guys,

I haven't seen anything on here yet about the waitlist movement since the decisions came out so I figured I'd provide a small update. I got an offer of admission a couple of days ago (I was initially waitlisted two weeks ago- I'm an IP applicant). I think that means there are some set waitlist rankings for IP but they are reserving some for those who will be interviewed at the end of April.

 

Good luck everyone!

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Hi guys,

I haven't seen anything on here yet about the waitlist movement since the decisions came out so I figured I'd provide a small update. I got an offer of admission a couple of days ago (I was initially waitlisted two weeks ago- I'm an IP applicant). I think that means there are some set waitlist rankings for IP but they are reserving some for those who will be interviewed at the end of April.

 

Good luck everyone!

Thanks for the update!! Congratulations!!!!

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Hi guys,

I haven't seen anything on here yet about the waitlist movement since the decisions came out so I figured I'd provide a small update. I got an offer of admission a couple of days ago (I was initially waitlisted two weeks ago- I'm an IP applicant). I think that means there are some set waitlist rankings for IP but they are reserving some for those who will be interviewed at the end of April.

 

Good luck everyone!

 

Congrats on the invite!!! So just to be clear you are a IP university level right?

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For CEGEP students, would my admission be rescinded if I do not graduate on time (end of May) and take a summer class to graduate before July 1st? For legitimate personal reasons, I'm struggling a lot this semester and may fail a class. Thank you!

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For CEGEP students, would my admission be rescinded if I do not graduate on time (end of May) and take a summer class to graduate before July 1st? For legitimate personal reasons, I'm struggling a lot this semester and may fail a class. Thank you!

 

The admissions website states that applicants to the Med-P program must not "have extended the length of their program for reasons of personal choice" or "have taken any of the prerequisite courses listed above outside of a regular semester." 

 

https://www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions/applying/requirements-edu/med-p-requirements --> see non-eligibility

 

Now, my personal take on it would be to contact the adcom directly to explain your situation. They might be able to consider it on a case by case basis, and hopefully, it will work out in your favour. 

 

We hope that the issues you are currently dealing with will eventually resolve, and wish you all the best on all of your future endeavours! Good luck!

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Hi McGillMedAmbassadors,

 

Thank you for answering the numerous questions that we have in this thread.

 

I have a question for you: How does the admission process works for Ph.D students that are almost done and want to apply to the MD.CM program?

 

Are the admission procedures the same as someone who completed a B.Sc?

 

Many thanks

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Kenjuro,

 

The admissions process for graduate students is indeed the same as it is for students with undergraduate degrees. One thing to keep in mind is that your prerequisite courses must have been completed within 8 years, even if you have been studying in a graduate program (see https://www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions/applying/requirements-edu/basic-science-prerequisites)

 

If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to ask.

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Concerning the location of the MMI at McGill - from the information they give, there is a coat check. How secure is this? I have to bring my laptop and school books with me to town... is it safe?

 

It should be okay - as far as we know, nothing bad has happened so far when it comes to coat check. Good luck on your interviews next week! We can't wait to meet you!

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I'm not an official ambassador, but I think it's roughly 10% of the med-p class that fails to be promoted. You can probably expect between 5-8 med-ps who don't meet criteria for promotion. However, they do have the opportunity to plead their case so the number who go officially un-promoted is not 100% clear. 

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Hi again! Hope you're still answering questions. Are there any stats on number of students failing to "graduate" P-Med? Thanks!

No school releases that kind of data publicly as it is somewhat ''shameful'', and highly variable. Why do you want to know that anyways?

Search the McGill forum. There was a discussion about this in a thread recently.

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Hi again! Hope you're still answering questions. Are there any stats on number of students failing to "graduate" P-Med? Thanks!

 

We apologize for the unclarity of our answer, but indeed, this number seems to vary every year. Indeed, even Med-Ps are not totally sure about who amongst their classmates will not be transitioning from Med-P to Med-1. It might be somewhere along the lines of 5-8 Med-Ps, although none of us would wish that on any of our future colleagues. Good luck!

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Hi McGillMedAmbassadors,

 

I've been reading the forum since last year but this is my first post. I don't know if you still answer questions after the admission period, but in case you do, I post my questions here. I am very concerned about the problem and really hope to have honest answers from current McGill MD students.

 

I was admitted this year at McGill and was approved for deferral until Aug 2016. Now I have a special personal situation that urges me to apply for a part time job and keep it for the coming years. I wonder if a part time job is compatible with MD first years, and to what extent. So here are my questions:

 

1) Could you give me an idea of the everyday academic schedule for a 1st year to 2nd year MD student at McGill? For example, when should you arrive in the morning to attend classes? When do you finish lectures at noon? When do you start and end group discussion in the pm? How about the other mandatory educational activities in parallel to the lectures and group discussions? What is a typical day like?

 

2) In average, how many hours do you need to study per day, besides the mandatory educational activities listed above, to pass the exams? (I know you may answer it varies from one to another, but in general, there should be an approximative standard for the study time. For example, 3 credits in university = per week 3 hours of lectures + 3 hours of lab + 3 personal hours. So what are the extra personal hours for a MD student per day or per week?) 

 

3) What are the longitudinal family med time requirements? Is it flexible or you need to follow a schedule that someone makes for you? (For example, is it during the spare time, like 5-7, weekends, or it's in the everyday schedule before 5 pm? Can you go freely as you want, or you must follow your doctors' office hours?) What is actually longitudinal family medicine?

 

4) Until which time point in the MD training should you totally forget to hold a part time job? (I guess "Core Clerkship" period and after doesn't allow you to have anything in parallel, but does the "Transition to Clinical Practice" still allow you to do a part time job?)

 

5) What is the average leisure time you can enjoy per day? (For example, during undergrad, I could afford to have about 2h every night to do things unrelated to study, like go shopping, reading books, do sports, go to restaurants etc.) Is MD 1st & 2nd years more time consuming than the undergrad?

 

I ask these questions in order to determine what kind of part time job I can apply, and for how long I can afford to do the job without jeopardizing my MD training. I will greatly appreciate your answers to each question and some practical advices if you want to share. (I just need to mention that the reason that I want to apply for the part time job is not at all financial. I am aware that as MD students you can get big loans from banks and money is not the issue. It is really a special family situation that I cannot find a better solution other than applying for a part time job).

 

Thank you in advance for reading my questions. I hope to hear from you soon. Welcome to all McGill MD students in the new curriculum to share your opinion on the topic. I really appreciate your support.

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Note: The information in this post is the personal opinion of one post-first-year McGill med ambassador. You should hopefully receive replies from multiple McGill med students to get a better idea about the likely ranges for time requirements as they are of course highly subjective.

 

1) Classes are from 8:30-11:30 every day. Small groups or afternoon activities usually start at 12:30 and can last until 3:30. Note that morning lectures are recorded so that you could miss the majority of them and watch them starting at 9 PM the same day (morning lectures are usually posted same day by 9 PM). Many of my classmates swear by this as you can watch lectures at a faster speed, pause when you need a break, sleep in, etc.

 

2) I suggest studying a minimum of 3 hours a day outside of lectures in order to pass exams. Note that the 3 hours of studying a day should include weekends!

 

3) There is protected time for the Longitudinal Family Medicine component, so it does not need to be scheduled outside of the curriculum.

 

4) I have not yet completed Fundamentals of Medicine and Dentistry, so I am not qualified to answer this question. I would not see a problem with holding a part-time job for the first year. I did and I know several of my classmates did as well who were not at risk of failing courses due to their part-time work.

 

5) You won't have two free hours every night, but I think most nights you should.
 

While you may be able to miss most mornings, I wouldn't find a job for 8-11 every morning because there will be some days that small groups will be scheduled for the morning hours. In general, though, you should have no trouble working a part-time job during Fundamentals of Medicine and Dentistry if you stay on top of your studies. I wouldn't suggest falling a week or more behind lectures while working part-time, though.

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Hi McGillMedAmbassadors,

 

I've been reading the forum since last year but this is my first post. I don't know if you still answer questions after the admission period, but in case you do, I post my questions here. I am very concerned about the problem and really hope to have honest answers from current McGill MD students.

 

I was admitted this year at McGill and was approved for deferral until Aug 2016. Now I have a special personal situation that urges me to apply for a part time job and keep it for the coming years. I wonder if a part time job is compatible with MD first years, and to what extent. So here are my questions:

 

1) Could you give me an idea of the everyday academic schedule for a 1st year to 2nd year MD student at McGill? For example, when should you arrive in the morning to attend classes? When do you finish lectures at noon? When do you start and end group discussion in the pm? How about the other mandatory educational activities in parallel to the lectures and group discussions? What is a typical day like?

-For most blocks, 8:30-11:30 are 3x50 minute lectures. Afternoons, we have labs (anat, histo) or small groups (public health, block relevant material, epidemiology, clinical method) and for most weeks, 1 afternoon of protected time for LFME. There are exceptions, such as labs the mornings and small groups in the mornings. On average (very gross average), you have 4 afternoons booked with school stuff and 1 completely off.

Attendance is only taken during small groups. You are free to never show up to any lecture nor labs. Lectures are recorded and available to download if you wish to listen to them because you want to relisten, or you don't attend class and you want to listen to them. You are obviously free not to watch lectures, nor to go to class.

 

2) In average, how many hours do you need to study per day, besides the mandatory educational activities listed above, to pass the exams? (I know you may answer it varies from one to another, but in general, there should be an approximative standard for the study time. For example, 3 credits in university = per week 3 hours of lectures + 3 hours of lab + 3 personal hours. So what are the extra personal hours for a MD student per day or per week?) 

-Highfly variable. Technically, if you have a fairly good science background, I think if you study 3 hours efficiently a day till 70% of the block has passed, and then start cramming for the exam, a grade of pass should be expected. Some blocks are heavier than others. For example, renal was unbelievably birdy, while GI and ID were much denser blocks. So, it's variable.  If you want to get honours, be ready to study a hell lot more. There are people who definitely study 5+ per day. Since it's med school, I would guess just like at any school, there would be people who study 7+ per day. I also know people who are at the other end of the spectrum too, who still passed the year. P=MD. As long as you pass, you're fine, and passing is really not that hard. Bottomline, it depends on how fast you learn, on your study methods, and on your objective (just pass, or get around the average or gunning hardcore for honours).

 

3) What are the longitudinal family med time requirements? Is it flexible or you need to follow a schedule that someone makes for you? (For example, is it during the spare time, like 5-7, weekends, or it's in the everyday schedule before 5 pm? Can you go freely as you want, or you must follow your doctors' office hours?) What is actually longitudinal family medicine?

-tldr: you are paired with a fam doc for the year. You need to go minimum 16 times at least 2 hours each to follow them in action in their clinics or hospitals. you get at the same time to learn a few things. You are obviously free to go to the preceptor's office outside of the protected time if the preceptor is okay with that. protip: be proactive. Life is unfair, because some students will get better preceptors than others and will get to do more and learn more. So the best you can do as a med student is to be proactive and to learn as much as you can and ask to do things. i.e. get supervised to do an IM injection, take a hx, do a physical exam before the preceptor and have them validate your findings etc.......

protip 2 (REALLY IMPORTANT): you don't have a car. You'll understand.

 

4) Until which time point in the MD training should you totally forget to hold a part time job? (I guess "Core Clerkship" period and after doesn't allow you to have anything in parallel, but does the "Transition to Clinical Practice" still allow you to do a part time job?)

If your part time job is only during weekends, I think it is feasible till the end of FMD if you're disciplined. However, would be possible to do it till the end of TCP? Not sure. For TCP, IM and comprehensive health blocks give you a lot of time off. However, TCP's surgery weeks are a bit hectic. Other than that, if you're highly efficient, and you work only during weekends, I would think it's possible to hold a part time job. (if you work less than 15 hours I suppose?)

Just a general warning: most people can't be disciplined enough to do that. I know that if I was perfectly disciplined, I would be able to have a job on the side. However, I tend to be lazy, since I'm a regular human being.

 

5) What is the average leisure time you can enjoy per day? (For example, during undergrad, I could afford to have about 2h every night to do things unrelated to study, like go shopping, reading books, do sports, go to restaurants etc.) Is MD 1st & 2nd years more time consuming than the undergrad?

-highly variable. 2 hours is completely realistic. It obviously is way more consuming than UG. 

 

I ask these questions in order to determine what kind of part time job I can apply, and for how long I can afford to do the job without jeopardizing my MD training. I will greatly appreciate your answers to each question and some practical advices if you want to share. (I just need to mention that the reason that I want to apply for the part time job is not at all financial. I am aware that as MD students you can get big loans from banks and money is not the issue. It is really a special family situation that I cannot find a better solution other than applying for a part time job).

 

Thank you in advance for reading my questions. I hope to hear from you soon. Welcome to all McGill MD students in the new curriculum to share your opinion on the topic. I really appreciate your support.

Edited by Arztin

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