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Adhd And Premed

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Any PreMed-ers here have ADHD? I was diagnosed with it during third year and I feel like this has screwed up any chance of getting into medical school. My grades from first to beginning for third year are crap, and because of that no research experience could be gained. Any tips/advice that you may have?

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Any PreMed-ers here have ADHD? I was diagnosed with it during third year and I feel like this has screwed up any chance of getting into medical school. My grades from first to beginning for third year are crap, and because of that no research experience could be gained. Any tips/advice that you may have?

 

Why don't you consider methods of studying that are suitable for you? I have a few friends with ADHD and they realize that flashcards are the best approach. Takes about a few hours sporadically in a term to make them, and you just flip through cards for about 5-10 mins at a time. No need for extensive study sessions that you feel you can no longer focus or get distracted; quick and easy way for constant exposure and studying. 

 

And you don't need research for med school. It's an unwritten rule of getting in (either it helps you get in or those who get in just do research too) but its not necessary. 

 

Remember, ADHD doesn't define you but it is still an integral part of your being. Don't push it under the rug or consider it a weakness. It's part of who you are and try to manage life with it. Maybe use it as inspiration for your experiences (e.g. working with students who have learning disabilities, trying to work in a psychology lab about attention, etc) and show that you have made the most of your time using ADHD to make a greater difference and not let it get in the way of what you dream of :) 

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I assume you're working with your school's student learning department - if not, find them NOW!

-Pomodoro-type short, timed sessions for a specific learning goal so you're not stuck trying to figure out a whole chapter at a time

-an agenda/schedule to plan absolutely everything from classes to appointments

-a well chosen study group/partner may help you stay on topic and more productive (or suck you off topic too)

-my school had tutoring groups for certain classes, check with the library

-http://calnewport.com/blog/

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I assume you're working with your school's student learning department - if not, find them NOW!

-Pomodoro-type short, timed sessions for a specific learning goal so you're not stuck trying to figure out a whole chapter at a time

-an agenda/schedule to plan absolutely everything from classes to appointments

-a well chosen study group/partner may help you stay on topic and more productive (or suck you off topic too)

-my school had tutoring groups for certain classes, check with the library

-http://calnewport.com/blog/

I've used them since my first year, and stop using them recently since I got a better hang of what I was doing, as well it should open spots to students who need it, since I've already gotten 3 years of advice. 

 

Been using Pomodoro, and it's great, but still manage to get sucked off track sometimes. 

My agenda is my life; plan everything with it and if something comes up, it's in there or else it's not happening. 

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Are you on meds? 

 

If you do very well now that you are diagnosed, you could write about this in the optional essay on OMSAS, I think. 

I've been doing better. First/second year had about an average of 2.7 (each year), whereas in third year it jumped to 3.0-3.3. It's not at the 3.7 mark this year (I'm in fourth year), but I'm trying to get that 3.7. I'm probably going to take another year. I've also applied to other programs, where hopefully I'll get that 3.7 as well.

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It sounds like you're doing a good job of improving over time! I must have misread, I thought you were earlier in the process of finding help.

I'm currently on meds, and started exercising regularly last week. I'm getting accommodations through my school's disability services, and marks have gone up since my diagnosis. First two years: 72% whereas third year (total) was 76%. First semester prediagnosis is about a 72-73, whereas post-diagnosis second semester is close to an 80%. However, marks still have been fluctuating a bit and things within school has been rocky in terms of emotions and whatnot, so definitely affecting things.

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I have been diagnosed with it since high school.  It definitely is possible to get good grades.  Although my first undergrad GPA weren't the greatest (2.5;3.0;3.55;3.87) my second undergrad GPAs are better (3.96; 4.0 [unless I really fuck up finals this April])

- I recently started using the services that let you write in exams in another room, with more time, and using a word processor.  I found that the tests that hurt my grades the most were the ones where I had to write essays or short answers.  I didn't know how much to write so I just wrote way too much, which killed up all my time, these services really helped me get over the time I wasted writing too much. 
- the meds definitely helped a lot, I didn't start taking them regularly until 4th/5th year, but that was also when I decided I wanted to become a doctor.  I noticed that if I ate a lot after taking my meds in the morning/afternoon that my attention wouldn't stay at an appropriate level compared to if I ate less.  This kind of sucked because I like eating, but to get around it I had a big breakfast in the mornings, then had nutritious beverages (Ensure Plus and protein shakes) at lunch, and finally bigger meals at dinner and for snacks.  
- I found that the best way for me to study was to be in a busy library where there was a quiet section with booths to study in.  With good earplugs in, I could study alone with no distractions for a long time, and when I got bored/needed a break I could walk around the library and look at people/things.  Exercise definitely helped too, if I noticed I was being too wound up in the mornings/afternoons I would plan my exercise in the mornings.

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I have been diagnosed with it since high school.  It definitely is possible to get good grades.  Although my first undergrad GPA weren't the greatest (2.5;3.0;3.55;3.87) my second undergrad GPAs are better (3.96; 4.0 [unless I really fuck up finals this April])

- I recently started using the services that let you write in exams in another room, with more time, and using a word processor.  I found that the tests that hurt my grades the most were the ones where I had to write essays or short answers.  I didn't know how much to write so I just wrote way too much, which killed up all my time, these services really helped me get over the time I wasted writing too much. 

- the meds definitely helped a lot, I didn't start taking them regularly until 4th/5th year, but that was also when I decided I wanted to become a doctor.  I noticed that if I ate a lot after taking my meds in the morning/afternoon that my attention wouldn't stay at an appropriate level compared to if I ate less.  This kind of sucked because I like eating, but to get around it I had a big breakfast in the mornings, then had nutritious beverages (Ensure Plus and protein shakes) at lunch, and finally bigger meals at dinner and for snacks.  

- I found that the best way for me to study was to be in a busy library where there was a quiet section with booths to study in.  With good earplugs in, I could study alone with no distractions for a long time, and when I got bored/needed a break I could walk around the library and look at people/things.  Exercise definitely helped too, if I noticed I was being too wound up in the mornings/afternoons I would plan my exercise in the mornings.

In terms of the meds, it seems like the other way aroudn for me. I skip breakfast as part of intermittent fasting, but it seems like the drugs wear off sooner. I usually have to use a coffee to boost its effects. I'm still looking for a place to consistently study, but the library cubicles seem to work. 

 

I tend to overthink answers and it's actually the written ones where I do better on; anyone got any advice how to stop overthinking things?

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