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Over40

Oldest First Year Med School Student You Know Of

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Hello Over40,

 

Brian Levy went into medicine in his late 40s.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/pursuing-a-dream-after-corporate-life/article4297034/?page=all

 

I remember that there was a show called "Med Students" that came on many years ago about medical students at McMaster. There was a student that was a retired high school teacher and I'm guessing he was in his 50s.

 

I think that age is just a number, so don't let it hold you back.  :)  I'm VERY close to 40 and have been rejected twice now, but am still going to try again.

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Hello Over40,

 

Brian Levy went into medicine in his late 40s.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/pursuing-a-dream-after-corporate-life/article4297034/?page=all

 

I remember that there was a show called "Med Students" that came on many years ago about medical students at McMaster. There was a student that was a retired high school teacher and I'm guessing he was in his 50s.

 

I think that age is just a number, so don't let it hold you back.  :)  I'm VERY close to 40 and have been rejected twice now, but am still going to try again.

hats off to you sir. i admire your dedication and determination. it will happen... it will happen  :lol:

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As much as I admire these people dedication I want to say if you get into med in your 50 it is to some extent wasting of resources by our health care system. Imagine you get into med when you are 50. in the shortest possible way you are out of school at 56 and lets say you work till 70. It is only 14 years. Why a school should lose a student who can be out of school in like mid 30 and work for 30-35 years and take someone older. It is a strategic mis-use of resources, so while I have a HUGE respect for these people I think there should be some sort of restriction at certain age specially cause our educational system is subsidized by taxpayers. 

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There are also people that go into medicine when they are younger and then decide to change careers when they are in their 40s and 50s so I would say that it all balances out.

 

It's not as if there are hundreds of 50 year olds being admitted every year.

 

Non-traditional applicants are also more likely to choose family medicine, which is where most of the physicians are needed.

 

They have also been working in other fields and contributing to society in other ways (and paying a lot of income tax that will help to subsidize their med school education :-)).

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As much as I admire these people dedication I want to say if you get into med in your 50 it is to some extent wasting of resources by our health care system. Imagine you get into med when you are 50. in the shortest possible way you are out of school at 56 and lets say you work till 70. It is only 14 years. Why a school should lose a student who can be out of school in like mid 30 and work for 30-35 years and take someone older. It is a strategic mis-use of resources, so while I have a HUGE respect for these people I think there should be some sort of restriction at certain age specially cause our educational system is subsidized by taxpayers.

That's a slippery slope argument and a weak one.

 

Reminds me of the old-age GP I met once who insisted women shouldn't go into med because they would only work part-time or stop working when they have kids.

 

There's no control over young physicians either, moving into a different nonclinical field or otherwise.

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Hello Over40,

 

Brian Levy went into medicine in his late 40s.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/pursuing-a-dream-after-corporate-life/article4297034/?page=all

 

I remember that there was a show called "Med Students" that came on many years ago about medical students at McMaster. There was a student that was a retired high school teacher and I'm guessing he was in his 50s.

 

I think that age is just a number, so don't let it hold you back.  :)  I'm VERY close to 40 and have been rejected twice now, but am still going to try again.

 

Wow a really interesting read, changed my view on older medical students. 

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We have two 32 year olds, maybe some that are older that I don't know about. They are some of the most grounded people and bring an insight that makes me realize just how young I actually am. Mac would definitely be the place to be for a non-trad.

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That's a slippery slope argument and a weak one.

Reminds me of the old-age GP I met once who insisted women shouldn't go into med because they would only work part-time or stop working when they have kids.

There's no control over young physicians either, moving into a different nonclinical field or otherwise.

Precisely, and it is an argument that has been used against women entering a variety of fields, not just medicine.

 

I have zero intention of going part time or not pulling my weight just because I have kids. I *like* working. A lot. I am not the domestic sort. Tried it. We were all miserable.

 

Also, I've known doctors who worked into their eighties. Probably not going to see a neurosurgeon do that, given, but I know family doctors whose retirement plans involved only a headstone. You don't stop being useful to society at some arbitrary age.

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As much as I admire these people dedication I want to say if you get into med in your 50 it is to some extent wasting of resources by our health care system. Imagine you get into med when you are 50. in the shortest possible way you are out of school at 56 and lets say you work till 70. It is only 14 years. Why a school should lose a student who can be out of school in like mid 30 and work for 30-35 years and take someone older. It is a strategic mis-use of resources, so while I have a HUGE respect for these people I think there should be some sort of restriction at certain age specially cause our educational system is subsidized by taxpayers. 

 

I've met a doctor gearing up to retire in their 40's and another still working while approaching 80 (quite efficiently too). Plenty of physicians do minimal or no clinical work (moving into research or administration). Age tells you less than you'd think about how long someone will practice.

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As much as I admire these people dedication I want to say if you get into med in your 50 it is to some extent wasting of resources by our health care system. Imagine you get into med when you are 50. in the shortest possible way you are out of school at 56 and lets say you work till 70. It is only 14 years. Why a school should lose a student who can be out of school in like mid 30 and work for 30-35 years and take someone older. It is a strategic mis-use of resources, so while I have a HUGE respect for these people I think there should be some sort of restriction at certain age specially cause our educational system is subsidized by taxpayers. 

 

except we aren't allowed to discriminate in Canada on the basis of age in such a way. There is no way to create that sort of barrier. It is important to maintain those freedoms collectively - they are the foundation of so much. You cannot say someone shouldn't do something because it doesn't maximize the benefit to society if that act actually attacks fundamental rights that are the basis of that socieity :)

 

and yes it is subsidized by taxpayers - although from the doctors point of view he/she will have paid back many times over in tax that cost given to him by the time he/she is done. Even in as short a time as 14 years. Plus they also contributed tax dollars for many years prior to going to medical school. One could argue unlike younger candidates they have earned their position from a cost point of view.

 

It is also worth it to through in people from various background into medicine. Sometimes you really need someone that thinks a bit differently to solve a problem. If we are all the same it weakens us. Diversity is strength.

Edited by rmorelan

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There is a lovely gentleman at my school in his fifties who is going for medicine.

 

I'm only 28 but feel older. Does that count?

 

Hooray for the 28 year old geezer club! *makes T-Shirts*

 

---------------

 

A physician working for 14 years and retiring? I know a good number are sadly deceased after short careers (an unavoidable fact) but my family doc is pushing 90 and still as sharp as ever... the energy that man has puts most people to shame. And mind you, he's been practicing since he was 21...

 

In other words, I think it's quite reasonable for many physicians to practice well beyond what one might consider typical retirement. Unfortunately we have no way of knowing the longevity and practicality of a given applicant's application...so our guiding principle is simply "May the best man (or woman) win." If the best is a 63 year old, so be it.

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Agree. Age is not a factor. Once you get a bit older and enter the working world you meet a whole lof of interesting people who have had some amazing life and work experiences, changed careers or changed the focus of their careers. It's not how you imagine life at 19 where you MUST choose a University program then MUST stay in that path forever and ever. You can actually do whatever you want with your life, if you have the drive to.

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Thank you all for your thoughtful responses. I will certainly apply. I am sure I would have so much to learn from the younger future doctors, but also so much to offer... I entered university for the first time at the age of 17 for a 6 year psychology course leading to a title of psychologist. Despite the young age, my grades were outstanding and I had the respect of my professors and colleagues. Two specializations and half of a master's degree later, I was immigrating to Canada with my spouse and young child, planning to stay for 3 years, learn the language, complete a master's degree and go back home. I had absolutely no English language skills. (Someone told me that in three months one could learn the language... and I believed it! :rolleyes:). Tough times with immense feelings of regret (and stupidity). Going back and restarting my career would be as hard as trying to make it work  here, so I decided to study hard and learn the language to be able to show the type of professional I was. Exactly a year later I was landing an excellent job in mental health with one of the major hospitals of the province. Two years later, the psychiatrist in the team mentioned that I should apply for med school instead of pursuing registration with the College of Psychologists (which would require a master's degree and 5 years of post-master's experience). I was way to insecure about my broken English to even consider that, and unaware of ways to finance the course. I decided  to complete my master's, but taking time off work was not an option, for financial reasons. I took my masters over two and half years on weekends and  evenings, while working full-time. I completed it with a 3.89 GPA, 6 months after having my second child. (Don't ask me how I managed it... I still don't know  :)). At that point I was again considering med school or a PhD, but after 6 years of incredibly hard work and so much stress, a young child and the chance to just enjoy life a little, I decided that I would just focus on my profession and my family for a while. This year I will finally become registered as a psychologist. I started looking for PhDs again, but none of the options seems to ignite my passion. Med school continues to be a desire (Family Medicine/Psychotherapy or Psychiatry) so I decided to apply and see what happens. I am staring to familiarize myself with the process, reading about the MCAT, CASPer, MMI, etc. I am not confident, but not discouraged either. Just wishing and hoping.  I am keeping it from everyone around me just to reduce the pressure of expectations, questions, comments, etc. The worst case scenario is that I will not get in, I will continue in my profession which I also love, and life will go on. The best case scenario...I will open the letter that starts with "CONGRATULATIONS!" and that will possibly inspire and motivate many others who may think they are too old to pursue their dreams.

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I too think you have the right stuff to apply!

 

If you need any help realistically assessing your chances at particular schools (based on ECs, your year by year GPA breakdown, MCAT etc) be sure to post! The non-trads are all solid people looking to help, and who have a tremendous wealth of knowledge.

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I'll be 35 when I walk into my first medical school class in July. Very excited!

Congratulations!!!!!! I've remembered your having posted stuff or answered stuff I asked, a while ago.  :D

 

 

Remember that your class might have MD/PhD students as well who are re-entering after doing their PhDs..... you most definitely will not be the oldest!!!!!

 

Ooh, why would MD/PHD be older? Cuz it takes them longer, is that why?

Those applying to medicine after doing their PhDs... yes these would likely be in their late 20's right?

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