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TrueBlueTenenbaum

The Next Step For A Repeat Applicant

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Hey guys,

I've applied in Canada twice already and failed to get an acceptance.
In the interest of time, I intend this upcoming cycle to secure an acceptance, in Canada, US, or Internationally (Preferably in the UK).

My stats are 5 year undergrad; 2.8 - 2.6 GPA 1st year, 3.8 2nd year, 3.75 3rd year, 3.77 4th year, ~3.6 5th year.
My MCAT is good, getting slightly over a 10 in all sections, for a total of 35S(Don't know how the WS is considered these days); however I wrote the exam in the summer of 2012 so it has been over 3 years.

I was wondering what specific schools or countries I should narrow my search to?
In terms of extracurriculars, I've had short term experiences (Summers) in a variety of medical settings such as family clinics, OB/GYN clinics, Nuclear medicine wards, palliative care as well as in the gift shop getting to know the local physicians. I currently work retail part time while looking to volunteer for the summer possibly doing research.

My major predicament is that I want to stop wasting time in stagnation, as well as use my fairly strong MCAT while it's applicable. However, I understand that many British schools require the BMAT instead, a task I am extremely bitter about performing since I've been through the grueling MCAT process already.

If anyone has any advice that would help me get into medicine somewhere I would be glad to listen!
I would like to come back to Canada in the future, but it is not the be-all end-all factor in these decisions.

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Hey guys,

 

I've applied in Canada twice already and failed to get an acceptance.

In the interest of time, I intend this upcoming cycle to secure an acceptance, in Canada, US, or Internationally (Preferably in the UK).

 

My stats are 5 year undergrad; 2.8 - 2.6 GPA 1st year, 3.8 2nd year, 3.75 3rd year, 3.77 4th year, ~3.6 5th year.

My MCAT is good, getting slightly over a 10 in all sections, for a total of 35S(Don't know how the WS is considered these days); however I wrote the exam in the summer of 2012 so it has been over 3 years.

 

I was wondering what specific schools or countries I should narrow my search to?

In terms of extracurriculars, I've had short term experiences (Summers) in a variety of medical settings such as family clinics, OB/GYN clinics, Nuclear medicine wards, palliative care as well as in the gift shop getting to know the local physicians. I currently work retail part time while looking to volunteer for the summer possibly doing research.

 

My major predicament is that I want to stop wasting time in stagnation, as well as use my fairly strong MCAT while it's applicable. However, I understand that many British schools require the BMAT instead, a task I am extremely bitter about performing since I've been through the grueling MCAT process already.

 

If anyone has any advice that would help me get into medicine somewhere I would be glad to listen!

I would like to come back to Canada in the future, but it is not the be-all end-all factor in these decisions.

 

I would strongly consider Edinburgh. 

 

They look at the MCAT, however they also require you to write the UKCAT. They are generally a pretty competitive school but i think you'll have a good chance with your MCAT and your 3.5+ cGPA. 

 

I'm not exactly sure how they will calculate your degree classification but my guess is you will get an upper 2nd class honours. If they drop your first year (which WES might do) you might have a chance at getting a 1st class honours but i'm not sure. 

 

Either way, I would recommend Edinburgh for sure. You are better off writing the UKCAT since its easier to study for and allows you to apply to more schools. The BMAT is only used by a select few schools, but again if you want to apply to schools like Imperial, Oxford, Cambridge, UCL, Keele you might want to write it. 

 

Consider GEM programs as well. The UK is basically a huge mess of application systems, preferences. You'll need to really sit down and explore every school every GEM program and find out what each one requires out of a Canadian applicant. 

 

Good luck

 

Another recommendation is Ireland. Ireland is an easier application process because the system they use the AB is accustomed to North American grades and applicants. You are definitely going to get in if you apply to Ireland's 4 year GEM programs. The same goes for Australia. 

 

You may also want to consider the US but this is not my area of knowledge so better ask on the US subforum. 

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If it was me, I would apply to USDO schools if they are still accepting your MCAT(check the aacomas CIB) before elsewhere. You would definitely get a few interviews with the 35mcat.

As of late, looks like DO will be IMG when applying for canadian residency so I would proceed with caution with that one

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As of late, looks like DO will be IMG when applying for canadian residency so I would proceed with caution with that one

As a AMG, you would still be far better off than any offshore school by going to a USDO school, in the US NRMP match. Added benefit of being able to go on F1 visa OPT during R1 to secure an H1B which non-US grads don't have the flexibility of doing.

 

And yes, for CaRMS, USDO would be on par with other IMGs, except in BC where they still have CMG status.  Shame they were put in the IMG class, but politics is politics. 

 

 

 

 

 

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As of late, looks like DO will be IMG when applying for canadian residency so I would proceed with caution with that one

I don't understand why some people look down on DO. DO=100% north american residency. IMG=lottery residency. How can you even compare the two?

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I don't understand why some people look down on DO. DO=100% north american residency. IMG=lottery residency. How can you even compare the two?

 

I'm not condoning this at all but the reason some people look down on DO is because of the whole: 

 

1. Alternative medicine - sure most DOs don't practice OMM at all but the profession still teaches it

2. European osteopaths - some countries like France still won't recognize a DO, at international conferences, I wonder how this might play out if you meet european

3. Less competitive - DO schools generally are less competitive schools to get into compared to MD schools

4. Not ranked/less research - DO schools are rarely ranked on the world rankings or US rankings and have less research than MD schools

5. Lack of recognition - DO isn't as recognized as the MD degree in North America by patients  

6. Good old fashioned dislike - The old guard MD may not have as much respect for DO  

 

Once you get past the residency issue, if DO bothers you its a thing that goes with you your entire career while residency is just a hurdle. 

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Tbh though, most US patients don't even know the difference between their NP, PA and MD/DO.

 

At the end of the day its mostly just the individual self esteem issues if anything lol. Grass is always greener.

 

I just find it funny that MBBS and all the other foreign degrees just jump on the MD and pretend like its no different either, but I digress.

 

I still stand firm that for most north american natives, if Canadian or USMD isn't an option(or the preferred option/location) then USDO beats majority IMG programs simply based on the political nature.

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I'm not condoning this at all but the reason some people look down on DO is because of the whole: 

 

1. Alternative medicine - sure most DOs don't practice OMM at all but the profession still teaches it

2. European osteopaths - some countries like France still won't recognize a DO, at international conferences, I wonder how this might play out if you meet european

3. Less competitive - DO schools generally are less competitive schools to get into compared to MD schools

4. Not ranked/less research - DO schools are rarely ranked on the world rankings or US rankings and have less research than MD schools

5. Lack of recognition - DO isn't as recognized as the MD degree in North America by patients  

6. Good old fashioned dislike - The old guard MD may not have as much respect for DO  

 

Once you get past the residency issue, if DO bothers you its a thing that goes with you your entire career while residency is just a hurdle. 

You are comparing Canadian/US MD to DO. I was comparing DO to IMG. Different comparisons.

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Tbh though, most US patients don't even know the difference between their NP, PA and MD/DO.

 

At the end of the day its mostly just the individual self esteem issues if anything lol. Grass is always greener.

 

I just find it funny that MBBS and all the other foreign degrees just jump on the MD and pretend like its no different either, but I digress.

 

I still stand firm that for most north american natives, if Canadian or USMD isn't an option(or the preferred option/location) then USDO beats majority IMG programs simply based on the political nature.

 

It really isn't but if you ask Brits they are very proud of their MBBS/MBChB and its history, try calling their MBBS a MD and you'll be corrected. Even their surgeons when they qualify refer themselves as Mr. which i've heard is considered a higher title amongst surgeons as trainee surgeons are still called Dr. There is a long history as to why Brits call their degrees MBBS. The MD in the UK is a higher doctorate basically a 2 year research degree. However trainee surgeons will not do a MD but a MCh, or masters of surgery in order to allow their surgeons to be referred to as Mr. 

 

It was actually the English who first called their degrees MB, or bachelor of medicine. The MD was a higher doctorate.

 

However Scotland is where the MD was first invented as the primary medical qualification, which was first adopted in NA by Columbia University. Initially in the first medical schools in the US the degree was called MB. 

 

Its really only Canadians/Americans who go abroad to Britain/Ireland/Aus who are bothered by being an MBBS which is the reason why Aus switched to MD recently.

 

From a match point of view I agree that DO is better than most IMG programs if not all if you specifically want residency in the US. From a self esteem point of view... I can sympathize with those who might prefer to not be a DO or don't like their alternative viewpoints. Of course one might wonder why anyone would prefer a DO degree over a MBBS degree but once any allopathic doctors enters residency they are "given" the MD title. Either way its a bit ridiculous, you'll see many British educated physicians in North America continue to refer to themselves as MB ChB or MBBS as per what they were given when graduating.   

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It really isn't but if you ask Brits they are very proud of their MBBS/MBChB and its history, try calling their MBBS a MD and you'll be corrected. Even their surgeons when they qualify refer themselves as Mr. which i've heard is considered a higher title amongst surgeons as trainee surgeons are still called Dr. There is a long history as to why Brits call their degrees MBBS. The MD in the UK is a higher doctorate basically a 2 year research degree. However trainee surgeons will not do a MD but a MCh, or masters of surgery in order to allow their surgeons to be referred to as Mr. 

 

It was actually the English who first called their degrees MB, or bachelor of medicine. The MD was a higher doctorate.

 

However Scotland is where the MD was first invented as the primary medical qualification, which was first adopted in NA by Columbia University. Initially in the first medical schools in the US the degree was called MB. 

 

Its really only Canadians/Americans who go abroad to Britain/Ireland/Aus who are bothered by being an MBBS which is the reason why Aus switched to MD recently.

 

From a match point of view I agree that DO is better than most IMG programs if not all if you specifically want residency in the US. From a self esteem point of view... I can sympathize with those who might prefer to not be a DO or don't like their alternative viewpoints. Of course one might wonder why anyone would prefer a DO degree over a MBBS degree but once any allopathic doctors enters residency they are "given" the MD title. Either way its a bit ridiculous, you'll see many British educated physicians in North America continue to refer to themselves as MB ChB or MBBS as per what they were given when graduating.   

Oh for sure haha, my point was that its just people on an individual level caring about their degree names.

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