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We Are Some First Year Year Ubc Medicine Students - Ask Us Anything!*

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*within the bounds of professional conduct

Given that interview invites are coming out pretty soon, we're sure you all have a lot of questions about what life as UBC medicine student is like. The following users will be answering your questions:

Myself
notanartist

Fleming

Gohan (he didn't agree to this but most likely he will) 

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how many hours of volunteering is necessary to not get rejected? Many reply saying it doesnt matter but what if u never volunteer 0, or do like 30 hours ur entire undergrad or do 1000 does it make any difference?

 

Obviously the more the better. Do you absolutely need 1000s? Probably not. But doing things that you've shown a long term commitment to and actually like will certainly help. If you've never done any volunteering, I'd imagine you'd have a tough time filling out the NAQ section. 

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Thanks for the reply! basically lets say I hav 30 hours of volunteering but 4000 hours of work experience and 2000 hours of extra curiccular experience (clubs etc). i am trying to improve on my volunteering but I am getting hopeless because the max I can achieve by the end of undergad is 120 hours or max 200 hours. Does that mean ur rejected because u didnt volunteer enough as other applicants? (this is not my profile just an example)

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Thanks for the reply! basically lets say I hav 30 hours of volunteering but 4000 hours of work experience and 2000 hours of extra curiccular experience (clubs etc). i am trying to improve on my volunteering but I am getting hopeless because the max I can achieve by the end of undergad is 120 hours or max 200 hours. Does that mean ur rejected because u didnt volunteer enough as other applicants? (this is not my profile just an example)

 

No. It's all about your holistic application. Lacking in one category doesn't mean you'll be rejected. 

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Questions:

1. Is there a competitive atmosphere in med school (I've noticed that this can happen during undergrad sometimes)?

2. What's something you now know about med school that you wish you knew before?

3. How did you guys prepare for interviews? 

 

Thanks :)

1. Not really, but it's still more competitive than I expected - there's still discussion about marks right after exams, people who are reluctant to share notes, etc. but overall, much less competitive than undergrad. 

2. How much material there is 

3. Read some basic medical ethics, did a lot of MMI practice

 

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Questions:

1. Is there a competitive atmosphere in med school (I've noticed that this can happen during undergrad sometimes)?

2. What's something you now know about med school that you wish you knew before?

3. How did you guys prepare for interviews? 

 

Thanks :)

 
1. A bit. Depends on who you talk to. Tomorrow we have a practice review session hosted by one of our classmates. Certainly this wouldn't have happened in my undergrad!
2. I wish I knew how cheap stethoscopes can be online (don't buy it from the bookstore!)
3. Lots of practice in groups of friends and strangers. At least being aware of current events and reading 1/3 of Doing Right.

1. Why do you never really participate in IceBowl?

2. Is there a secret passage in the MSAC?

3. What's the best hangout place for UBCmeds in Vancouver?

 

;)

 
1. I guess we don't like ice hockey as much as other schools.
2. There is, but it can't be used as an entrance
3. In school: The student lounge at LSC, I'd say. Outside of school: Restaurants. We love food.
 

Hi guys, thanks for doing this

 

question is stemming of removal of science pre-reqs

 

how essential are the chemistry, biochem, bio, ochem, for learning/ understanding the material, or is a lot of it retaught in med school. 

 

I wouldn't say it's essential. There are some introductory lectures that teach you basic concepts from these (especially cell bio and genetics), but things like ochem or biochem? It hasn't really come up yet. Sure, lecturers will mention sulfide bonds or make some references to amino acid structures- but these are basic concepts that can be google'd pretty easily and aren't imperative for understanding concepts.

 

If I was on the admissions board with the experiences I've had in first year, I would make physiology and anatomy prereqs rather than physics, ochem or biochem.

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I've never for the life of me understood why physiology and anatomy are not pre-reqs, yet organic chemistry is. Bizarre.

 

 

1. A bit. Depends on who you talk to. Tomorrow we have a practice review session hosted by one of our classmates. Certainly this wouldn't have happened in my undergrad!

2. I wish I knew how cheap stethoscopes can be online (don't buy it from the bookstore!)

3. Lots of practice in groups of friends and strangers. At least being aware of current events and reading 1/3 of Doing Right.

 

 

1. I guess we don't like ice hockey as much as other schools.

2. There is, but it can't be used as an entrance

3. In school: The student lounge at LSC, I'd say. Outside of school: Restaurants. We love food.

 

 

 

I wouldn't say it's essential. There are some introductory lectures that teach you basic concepts from these (especially cell bio and genetics), but things like ochem or biochem? It hasn't really come up yet. Sure, lecturers will mention sulfide bonds or make some references to amino acid structures- but these are basic concepts that can be google'd pretty easily and aren't imperative for understanding concepts.

 

If I was on the admissions board with the experiences I've had in first year, I would make physiology and anatomy prereqs rather than physics, ochem or biochem.

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I have a question

Would you say that any one of the sites are more supportive towards student's with children? As in they offer more supports, flexibility, etc? I've had my heart set on two of the distributed sites but sometimes I wonder if VFMP may be a better option for students with young families....

Thanks :)

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First of all, thank you to all the med students who are participating in answering our questions!

 

My questions is: What do you think about the new curriculum? What advice would you give about the new curriculum (in terms of preparing and so on) to those who will start next year?

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I have a question

Would you say that any one of the sites are more supportive towards student's with children? As in they offer more supports, flexibility, etc? I've had my heart set on two of the distributed sites but sometimes I wonder if VFMP may be a better option for students with young families....

 

Thanks :)

There are quite a few people with children, I can't imagine it would be significantly different between the sites - perhaps it may be harder to access childcare services at NMP? (That is just my uninformed first thought that comes to mind). Other than that, the satellite campuses are all very supportive for their small cohorts in general,  but it would be a great question to ask when you get to the interview stage :)  VFMP at the UBC campus, does have a lot of options for childcare/housing etc, but i wouldnt let that be the sole deciding factor. 

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I have a question

Would you say that any one of the sites are more supportive towards student's with children? As in they offer more supports, flexibility, etc? I've had my heart set on two of the distributed sites but sometimes I wonder if VFMP may be a better option for students with young families....

 

Thanks :)

I think the general consensus would be that the smaller programs are more accommodating for most things since they appear to be a bit more invested in their students. Anecdotally, the northern program typically has the most families and older students in it, but I'm sure there will be year to year variation.

 

Really, any site will work for a young family... You just have to be a strong advocate for what you want and also make friends with student affairs. I'd suggest moving close to your main site/hospital as a shorter commute and ability to dart home for lunch or a break would make a huge difference.

 

That's coming from a fourth year student... No kids, but older and married.

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First of all, thank you to all the med students who are participating in answering our questions!

 

My questions is: What do you think about the new curriculum? What advice would you give about the new curriculum (in terms of preparing and so on) to those who will start next year?

 

I'm a fan of the new curriculum. It's a bit rough around the edges, but I see it as a positive change from what previous students had. I like that our weeks are very theme based, so nearly every lecture, group activity, clinical skill, etc. in a week is related. As time goes on, I'm certain the curriculum will get more streamlined.

 

I would advise you to take the summer off. There's not really anything to be gained by being keen in the summer before you start. Once you start, focus on keeping up and always review. The new curriculum has an emphasis on 'spiraling'- meaning that many concepts will be re-visited weeks or months later. The ability to remember stuff from weeks prior is an advantage (and promotes long term understanding)

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Cool idea. Thanks a lot everyone. Just a few questions.

 

How's the work/life balance going for you all? Do you find that you have significant time to pursue other interests and social engagements, or is the time commitment to studying pretty heavy?

 

What's one thing about medicine/becoming a doctor you've experienced that you weren't expecting/weren't prepared for?

 

Does the 'race' ever end in medicine? Getting into the program is a great step, but are residencies a major thing on your mind? I really want to believe that after the bottleneck in the premed stage, everything chills out a little.

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