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Foreign Trained Dentists Flooding The Market Ndeb Equivalency Process. Your Thought And Observation As New Grad?

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264 licenses were granted in 2014 ,  242 license were granted in 2015, and more are coming this year according to https://ndeb-bned.ca/en/resources/historical-pass-rates

 

I am practicing  as an associate dentist  in Toronto graduated from dental school in 2012. I have seen my boss getting more and more  dental associate applicants recently got their license through equivalency process. Many of them are willing to work during odd hours like Sundays and doing scalings  in my boss's office because there are no patients available. Most of them were recent immigrants settled down in GTA and have kids, so their chance of  moving to rural area to practice dentistry is basically zero.  I noticed  that because most of them are fresh off the boat immigrants , they can't relate to the patients growing up in Canada, so most of them are only treating patients of their same race in their community. Most of them are experienced dentists back home so my boss hires them to do specialty procedures like complex endo or 3rd molar exo's referring out less to the specialists. I also don't understand how some of them can pass the equivalency exam with limited English. One of them asked me what is full mouth series on her first day of work with my boss. So my conclusion is that you just need to be a good exam taker to become licensed though NDEB Equivalency Process and most of them will stay in major city like GTA to practice dentistry. Therefore, the Equivalency Process doesn't solve the shortage of dentist in rural Canada. It's just a cash cow for the  dental association who granted them dental license. What is your thought and observation about NDEB Equivalency Process?

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264 licenses were granted in 2014 ,  242 license were granted in 2015, and more are coming this year according to https://ndeb-bned.ca/en/resources/historical-pass-rates

 

I am practicing  as an associate dentist  in Toronto graduated from dental school in 2012. I have seen my boss getting more and more  dental associate applicants recently got their license through equivalency process. Many of them are willing to work during odd hours like Sundays and doing scalings  in my boss's office because there are no patients available. Most of them were recent immigrants settled down in GTA and have kids, so their chance of  moving to rural area to practice dentistry is basically zero.  I noticed  that because most of them are fresh off the boat immigrants , they can't relate to the patients growing up in Canada, so most of them are only treating patients of their same race in their community. Most of them are experienced dentists back home so my boss hires them to do specialty procedures like complex endo or 3rd molar exo's referring out less to the specialists. I also don't understand how some of them can pass the equivalency exam with limited English. One of them asked me what is full mouth series on her first day of work with my boss. So my conclusion is that you just need to be a good exam taker to become licensed though NDEB Equivalency Process and most of them will stay in major city like GTA to practice dentistry. Therefore, the Equivalency Process doesn't solve the shortage of dentist in rural Canada. It's just a cash cow for the  dental association who granted them dental license. What is your thought and observation about NDEB Equivalency Process?

 

Why are you lamenting the shortage of dentists in rural areas when your post specifically states that you don't work there either?

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If you look at the "looking for" job listings, locums wanted listings, etc., and just ask clinic owners, yes, there is a huuuuuge proliferation of foreign dentists (this is my experience in the GTA).

 

The upside: independent operators, small corps, don't really want to hire them. I've heard this first hand from a lot of owners who get dozens if not hundreds of applications for their positions and a lot of them are from foreign grads. A lot of job listings also now say "international grads need not apply" or demand at least 2-3 years of "domestic experience." 

 

The downside: larger corps, which are only getting larger, couldn't give two shits, and just want someone to see patients. And they are free to open/buy practices as they please.

 

If you leave the GTA (at least beyond 1-1.5 hours of it, and I mean 1-1.5 hours from any edge of the GTA), you'll probably find a much different story.

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i also want to point out that the flood of foreign dentists will not only harm dentists but it will harm patients as well. We are seeing a lot of over treatment and low quality dental care due to over saturation and increased competition. The public needs to be educated about this and we need to take action to stop the flood of foreign dentists. 

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I am not lamenting about the shortage of dentists in rural area. In fact, I don't think there is shortage of dentist in Canada at all. The increasing number of foreign trained dentists through equivalency process has been increasing every year. More foreign trained dentists get their license through equivalency process than domestic dental school grad. https://ndeb-bned.ca/en/resources/historical-pass-rates

 

some of those  foreign trained dentists  I work with are clinically more experienced than me. Cases that I usually refer to specialist are given to them to complete. Yes, some of these dentists may over treat but some of domestic dentist  may over treated. My issue is that NDEB equivalency is nice cash cow for the government. The government is also setting up testing center oversea. 

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I am not sure if the equivalency process or new reciprocal agreement between Australia, NZ and Ireland caused more saturation of dentists, but one thing for sure is that there definitely has been a huge increase in dentists that are practicing in Canada who have studied outside. I actually think I meet more foreign (non-Canadian schools including US) trained dentists when I attend CE courses these days.

 

Out of curiosity does anyone know of someone who trained in Canada but decided to move elsewhere to practice other than US? This so called reciprocity got to have some sort of outflow as well?

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