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hello everyone, I'm no special snowflake...my story is pretty much similar to all other brave souls on this thread.

 

ill try to keep this short and to the point...

 

finished 1st degree in human bio and neuro-took 5 years at UofT, cGPA 2.63 (spend a lot of time studying, but not studying correctly). in HS I volunteered at several hospitals that landed me at SickKids in a research training program so I did that for about 2 years + I did work study as an RA at at a hospital for 2 years until I graduated.

 

after graduation, spend an entire year looking for work with no luck, at the same time decided to apply 2-year fast track with no real hopes of getting in. as luck would have it I got hired by the same research group wherebi worked as an RA working as their research coordinator (started 10 months ago) and boss allowed me to go back to school and work part time-ish.

 

I just finished my 1st semester in my new program got A's in all 6 classes + 2 new publications in major medical journals from research at work

 

Second semester will be starting soon but my classes are pre-scheduled and I can literally only work 1 full day (this will surely not be acceptable to my boss + I have bills to pay)

 

I work with doctors day in and out (specifically anesthesiologists)..they think I'm crazy to go back to school and waste all this time and money just for more years ahead in med. working with them has fueled my dreams for a med career that much more but I also have to be realistic.

 

I could finish the 1st year of my second UG and apply, or I could just give it all up and continue working and making a descent salary-maybe go back for an MSc in biostat or epidemiology. I know the last 2 options will not make me happy and I have to try applying to med at least once.

 

I'll be finishing my first year in April 2017, writing the MCAT in September and applying in October

would MAC (they seem to be more wholesome), Ottawa maybe? or should I just complete the degree-then apply to western, queens and Ottawa

 

this turned out or be longer than I wanted, so thanks for reading this far

 

any advise is welcome :(

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First off, really ask yourself why you want to pursue medicine. 

 

With the cGPA from your first UG degree you have no shot anywhere. If you manage to get at least a 3.8+ GPA with a full course load for two consecutive years you can have a shot at Western and Queen's but then you need to have a high MCAT score. Lookup the cutoffs for Western from last cycle which were fairly stringent, while Queen's can be a little more forgiving. You'd need a higher GPA for 3 consecutive years to interview at Ottawa.

 

I'm not entirely sure how Western and Queen's look at GPA when someone has already completed a degree as I think they usually just look at your 2 most recent full course load years and would assume that would just carry over if someone was doing a second degree--might be something to double check.

 

Honestly, I would find it difficult to justify applying for med with you current GPA. If your cGPA was somewhere around 3.3-3.5 bare minimum and you had a killer MCAT and solid ECs and CASPer as well as reference letters then maybe you'd have a shot at McMaster or Calgary if you were IP for Alberta--you wouldn't be competitive, but you would have a shot.

 

I'm not sure what going into medicine and killing yourself trying to piece together a competitive application would give you at this point.

 

Want money? Do something else--it'll be a lot of time, debt and stress before you even make your first paycheque as an MD.

 

Want to work in healthcare? There's nursing, kinesiology, physiotherapy, chiropractic, occupational therapy, massage, lab techs, etc.

 

Want to develop long term relationships with patients/clients, have a tangible impact on their lives and really help them? Consider social work or some of the above careers.

 

As you mentioned, you may also consider doing something in biostats, epidemiology or public health if that interests you.

 

Medicine is cool and all, but it's really not some amazing thing that you absolutely have to do or that is going to magically make you happy.

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thanks for the feedback freewheeler.

 

I agree completely, with my current grades I stand no chance, unless I ace the MCAT, and complete this degree with stellar grades...I checked with queens and they would take best 2 years from the second degree. 

 

I know the field is not all rainbows and sunshine. like I said I work with physicians at all levels (staff, residents, and fellows)...I'm also aware of other careers in healthcare. but I know this is what I want to do- my reasons? its a combination of personal and life experiences mixed with general curiosity for clinical work- difficult to articulate in words really

 

maybe I just needed reassurance or for someone to tell me that it is not the end all or be all if it didn't work out

 

thank you for pointing that out

 

 

Medicine is cool and all, but it's really not some amazing thing that you absolutely have to do or that is going to magically make you happy.

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I am a resident. I started undergrad at age 28, med at 31 and I have thrown everything I have at this, sacrificed my family's happiness, and have many more years to go before I am anywhere near a stable staff job.

 

On most days I would trade this for 70 grand a year and no debt in a stable 9-5 provided I didn't treated like complete crap and I got to use my brain for at least 15 minutes a day. Every now and then though I see or do something that no other person on the planet gets to do and I am filled with awe and would gladly sacrifice it all all over again.

 

I can't tell you it will be ok if it doesn't work out because i don't know the answer myself. What I do know, or rather the reason I don't quit on those days when everything totally sucks is because as cliched as this sounds; you only get one turn at this game and for some people not aiming for the top spot is the ultimate betrayal to oneself.    

 

I think if you are asking strangers on a website what will make you happy you have someone you need to get better acquainted with and I would do that before i made any life decisions. 

 

GL

Edited by Fresh fry

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You have no realistic chance at interviews in Fall 2017 as it would still rely on your first undergrad marks.  Even the "holistic schools" wont look kindly at it even if you had spectacular MCAT/ECs/Casper, etc.

 

You could still do this, but it will likely take a near completed 2nd undergrad to get the new GPA you need to open only a couple of schools. You need the marks in hand -  not in progress - so you are looking at Fall 2019 application cycle.    When you do write the MCAT  don't wait til Sept - it makes it very close to get results in time.    

 

You would have a very long uphill climb --- but only you can decide if it is worth it. 

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Hello there. I didn't read your thread, but here's my 2c.

 

I was in your situation, and I chose to work after my graduation from my first degree. Working, and being away from school gave me much needed clarity about my life and to set the right goals for myself.

 

I say work a couple of years and re-evaluate your choice of doing med. I'm now back in school improving my grades.

 

All the best to you.

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Hey minimufin. It seems like you got quite a bit of constructive, but also a bit of harsh criticism. I agree with a lot of what's said above - medicine is not a cakewalk. You work with physicians, so you know how hectic a lifestyle it can all be. Don't hold medicine up as this esoteric end-place, that when secured, will grant you happiness. Really think about all the advice given here. That being said: here's some practical advice.

 

I was in a similar position as you in that my GPA was quite low when I made one of these threads (you can see what I did over at my thread titled 'lost' in the non-trad forum). However, your GPA is on the 'extremely' low side. This means that Mac and UofT may potentially be a lost cause. As it stands now, you're just throwing money away by applying to ANY schools. If you get a 4.0 this year (with a full course load), the only school you should consider applying to is Western for their 'conditional acceptance' (although you'd need to have done quite well on the MCAT). I don't know the details of the conditional acceptance, so look it up!

 

You just proved to yourself that getting an A+ was possible. Do this consistently. If you can maintain a full course load for this year and next while getting a high OMSAS GPA and MCAT, then Western/Queens are in the running.

 

If you do another year after those two years, then Ottawa would also become part of your potential schools (although they have quite a few pre-reqs). But Ottawa needs pretty much straight 4.0s for three years for you to have a good chance. I had a 3.92 wGPA for Ottawa with ECs/reference letters good enough for a Queens interview, but was flat out rejected by Ottawa pre-interview.

 

It'll definitely be an uphill battle. But it's very possible. However, I'd encourage you to do some introspection about what you want. If medicine is really it, prove to yourself that you can do it by killing your first year.

 

Good luck friend!

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Heres how UWO applies to you (from their website):

 

"I am still in school but only have one year which meets the minimum GPA. Am I still eligible to apply?

 

If you have one undergraduate year which meets the minimum GPA and are currently enrolled in full-time studies, you are eligible to apply. If you were to receive an offer of admission, it would be conditional on meeting the minimum GPA in your current year of study (with 5 full course equivalents at the requisite levels)."

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Hey minimufin. It seems like you got quite a bit of constructive, but also a bit of harsh criticism. I agree with a lot of what's said above - medicine is not a cakewalk. You work with physicians, so you know how hectic a lifestyle it can all be. Don't hold medicine up as this esoteric end-place, that when secured, will grant you happiness. Really think about all the advice given here. That being said: here's some practical advice.

 

I was in a similar position as you in that my GPA was quite low when I made one of these threads (you can see what I did over at my thread titled 'lost' in the non-trad forum). However, your GPA is on the 'extremely' low side. This means that Mac and UofT may potentially be a lost cause. As it stands now, you're just throwing money away by applying to ANY schools. If you get a 4.0 this year (with a full course load), the only school you should consider applying to is Western for their 'conditional acceptance' (although you'd need to have done quite well on the MCAT). I don't know the details of the conditional acceptance, so look it up!

 

You just proved to yourself that getting an A+ was possible. Do this consistently. If you can maintain a full course load for this year and next while getting a high OMSAS GPA and MCAT, then Western/Queens are in the running.

 

If you do another year after those two years, then Ottawa would also become part of your potential schools (although they have quite a few pre-reqs). But Ottawa needs pretty much straight 4.0s for three years for you to have a good chance. I had a 3.92 wGPA for Ottawa with ECs/reference letters good enough for a Queens interview, but was flat out rejected by Ottawa pre-interview.

 

It'll definitely be an uphill battle. But it's very possible. However, I'd encourage you to do some introspection about what you want. If medicine is really it, prove to yourself that you can do it by killing your first year.

 

Good luck friend!

 

I had a 3.92 wgpa for Ottawa and was interviewed by them and not Queens. So essentially, OP, it can be hard to predict where you will interview, but you want to be able to apply to more schools rather than less...

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Just a few objective facts you ought to keep in mind, OP.

 

1. Given your second undergrad degree was a fast tracked, 2-year degree, those grades might not qualify for Western's med school. Quote from Schulich's FAQ page:

"What if I already have an undergraduate degree but am working towards or have recently completed a second undergraduate degree?
Applicants who embark on a second undergraduate degree program are eligible to apply during the final year of their new program. In order to be considered for GPA purposes, the second degree must be equivalent to a four-year degree. In this situation, GPA consideration will be based only on the two best years of the second degree program. Course load and course level requirements for the second degree are analogous to the requirements of the first degree. Applicants who are given a conditional offer must complete all program requirements for the second degree by June 30th."
I'm really sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but it's something you need to know in order to adequately assess your situation. In terms of the other medical schools, I don't know how a 2-year degree program will be considered. You really need to do your homework in this regard and go over each school's admissions process.
 
2. You need to accurately assess your new Ryerson grades on the OMSAS/AAMC grading scales (if you're considering US schools). When you say you got all "A's" do you mean A+, A, or A-? Because that corresponds to 4.0, 3.9, and 3.7, respectively. You gotta keep that in mind when applying as well.

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Currently a resident. I had a 2.1 GPA or something similar for my first four years of undergrad (with a huge downward trend, fourth year was 0.7 GPA - whoops).

 

The advice everyone above has is good. Your goal is possible but will involve MUCH sacrifice. If you're really going to put yourself out there, you should probably try to go in person to admissions offices at Queen's / Western with your transcripts and try to talk to someone. The last thing you need is to spend a year or two taking a full courseload and find out it doesn't count because you inadvertently violated one of Western's second degree rules. 

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