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YesIcan55

Long Term Hardcore Mmi Prep

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This past year I started prepping for my first and only ever MMI only just after receiving it (4 weeks.)

I did not prepare nearly to the best that I could, and I felt horrible upon finishing the MMI.

I scored 20th percentile on my MMI, not as bad as it looks considering for Calgary 50th percentile was a MMI raw score of 13.5/20 while I got 12.3/20. (so obviously many scores are clustered in that range).

Nonetheless, I want to make drastic changes to my MMI game and I am willing to use any resource/do anything to for it even if it means I start tomorrow. I will outline what I think contributed to my low MMI score to make things more clear for you

 

1) I came into the MMI tense and serious. I was not calm and this probably showed in my demeanour and how I presented my answers. How can I remedy this?

2) I presented my answers way too robotically, using words like "Moreover" "Secondly" etc etc..words I wouldnt normally use in my everyday casual speech and so maybe I did not come as authentic. 

3) This might sound irrational but I was paranoid I would get red-flagged every station and so at almost every station I simply told them what I thought they wanted to hear..and that probably was my main downfall. I remember one station I told the interviewer my real thoughts and that made him laugh, smile, and I could tell he saw that I was authentic. 

4) Is there a correct, or better answer to the MMI? My mistake was trying to find this answer even if I didn't agree with it, and again this probably came out as fake (I am a very bad liar)- someone please tell me if there is ever a right answer.

 

Now....should I start prepping in June? July? August? September? for MMIs..I am taking the year off so I have lots of free time...how should I prep? I am trying to find a job where I have to communicate with people a lot to improve my comfort level speaking to strangers...anything else? I am willing to do anything, thank you. 

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I think you are thinking too much about it, an MMI is just like any other interview - a personality assessment hidden in a series of ethical, medical, or situational based questions. 

 

I prepared for my MMI and other interviews for a few months (from Jan-April) maybe 1-2 times per week. Things that helped me the most:

1) Recorded myself (both visual/audio) to see my body language, facial expressions and overall tone/pace -- also helped me find what I say a lot of (like "you know")

 

2) Remember to be myself! I responded to ethical and situational based questions how I would in real life, what I would do, how I would act etc. this adds authenticity and shows them how your rationalize your view of things 

 

3) Prepared with strangers! Seriously this was key - practiced with people I have never spoken to in my life, which helped to mimic the real scenario and got me situated with the format, and overall experience of interview day. Probably best booster of confidence is doing the "simulated experience" many times.

 

I don't think you need almost a full year of preparation to do well on a medical school interview. Seriously, just relax and try to change your outlook on the whole process, don't let it become a burden to your everyday life -- enjoy yourself, do normal (non-medical application related things) that provide you with satisfaction in your life.

 

On a side note, some other things I did that may help:

1) Read Doing Right (just a few chapters)  to understand more about medical ethics and what the "Right thing to do is in certain situations"

2) Read a few Medical School interview books -- the standard "The Medical Interview"

-- Note: These things didn't really help all that much, but were not bad to do on my spare time to make me feel like I was being productive.

 

My number one advice -- don't make getting into medical school the thing you think about all the time, the thing that keeps you south of normal. Enjoy life and keep yourself distracted, socialize with your friends and do fun things, meet strangers, form new connections. Still want medicine, of course, but also focus on the present and the other things that life has to offer. Once applications and interviews roll around, prepare and be your best self (be you!). You will one day get into medicine if you really want it, but when you do, you will reflect on the past and hopefully there won't be too many regrets.

 

Cheers and all the best. :) 

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I think you are thinking too much about it, an MMI is just like any other interview - a personality assessment hidden in a series of ethical, medical, or situational based questions. 

 

I prepared for my MMI and other interviews for a few months (from Jan-April) maybe 1-2 times per week. Things that helped me the most:

1) Recorded myself (both visual/audio) to see my body language, facial expressions and overall tone/pace -- also helped me find what I say a lot of (like "you know")

 

2) Remember to be myself! I responded to ethical and situational based questions how I would in real life, what I would do, how I would act etc. this adds authenticity and shows them how your rationalize your view of things 

 

3) Prepared with strangers! Seriously this was key - practiced with people I have never spoken to in my life, which helped to mimic the real scenario and got me situated with the format, and overall experience of interview day. Probably best booster of confidence is doing the "simulated experience" many times.

 

I don't think you need almost a full year of preparation to do well on a medical school interview. Seriously, just relax and try to change your outlook on the whole process, don't let it become a burden to your everyday life -- enjoy yourself, do normal (non-medical application related things) that provide you with satisfaction in your life.

 

On a side note, some other things I did that may help:

1) Read Doing Right (just a few chapters)  to understand more about medical ethics and what the "Right thing to do is in certain situations"

2) Read a few Medical School interview books -- the standard "The Medical Interview"

-- Note: These things didn't really help all that much, but were not bad to do on my spare time to make me feel like I was being productive.

 

My number one advice -- don't make getting into medical school the thing you think about all the time, the thing that keeps you south of normal. Enjoy life and keep yourself distracted, socialize with your friends and do fun things, meet strangers, form new connections. Still want medicine, of course, but also focus on the present and the other things that life has to offer. Once applications and interviews roll around, prepare and be your best self (be you!). You will one day get into medicine if you really want it, but when you do, you will reflect on the past and hopefully there won't be too many regrets.

 

Cheers and all the best. :)

Other than some of the doing right etc.. I have to disagree with this assessment. 

 

Definitely do not agree that it's like any other interview. It's a chance to change your life to pursue your dreams and it should be taken extremely seriously (which you're starting to do which is great). 

 

Now for some people preparing little is fine if you are already coming in with a higher level of critical thinking, high communication skills, and a wide perspective, but honestly some people don't and they need more help. This doesn't mean practicing like a robot but it does mean some people need to work harder at it. 

 

I wrote about this in great detail in a previous post ~ 2 yrs ago. I'll attach it below...

(the original thread is here http://forums.premed101.com/index.php?/topic/86211-is-it-too-early-to-prepare-for-interviews/#entry959565)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

I want to preface my response by first reminding you (and any other interested readers) that there is no one formula for success. Setting aside the fact that different entering stats allow for some flexibility on interview performance, there are many factors that come into play for how well you do on the MMI. My answer however will be somewhat based on my own experiences, and based on a track record of helping others into medicine over the last two years. Some background on myself: http://forums.premed101.com/index.php?/topic/41062-success-stories-non-trad-style/page-20#entry953358

In your honest opinion, how would you prepare for interviews? I don't wish to see comments like: you just have to be good at it, you just need to be a good person. I want practical, methodologically sound and concrete ways to improve MMI scores.

 

Brutally honest opinion incoming .... I feel that many students who fail have some of these common problems: arrogance/ignorance ("I got this... how hard can it be?," "I've done harder things in my life," or my personal favorite "My stats are a shoe-in for medicine."), simple-minded (as in they barely scratch the surface of some complex problems/discussions... If there are answers to these persistent issues, pretty sure we'd do something about it by now), and interpersonal weaknesses (difficulty conveying ideas, providing evidence/support, nervous/scared/panicked, or narrow perspectives). Many people will tell you that you have to be yourself, and that honesty and integrity carry you far in the interview. This advice is true. You definitely should have an understanding of your motivations for medicine and act with honesty and integrity throughout. What people don't mention as often is that "being yourself" isn't very impressive when "yourself" has nothing between your ears (this part I acknowledge people will want to debate about some more). Some people are inherently critical thinkers and can delve deeper into the complexities of certain problems, but many people don't.... I certainly wasn't.

 

Personally, I soft prepped (as in not doing practice scenarios) for about 1.5 years, then hard prepped (as in scenario-specific and reflections) for the last 0.5 year.

During my soft prep, I spent as much time as I can working on learning more about pervasive health issues through as many sources as I can (my public health readings/papers, economist/debate forums, news sites/newspaper, books like "Doing Right" etc...) I tried to read and diversify my understanding as much as possible. I would read at least an hour a day, sometimes two. Reading alone does f@#$ all though unless you try to reflect and think about some consequences to other invested stakeholders. Push yourself with more systems level thinking (individual, group, society, past, present, future). Come near summer before the application cycle, I upped it to two hours. During the school year, I would maintain 2 hours but 3 hours on the weekend. About 1.5 months before Christmas, I maintained 3.5 hours. You find the time... wake up at 5-6 everyday? read on public transit? read during lunch? you do it.

 

When it came to the scenario practicing, I did an initial one through a course offered at the UofA hosted by two residents just as a warm-up (I took this course twice since I was in grad school and didn't apply for a year so that I can finish my degree.) I practiced with friends, physicians, med students. Whoever I felt could give me harsh/honest advice and know that they are capable people. Reach out to past friends/family, ask around with your other colleagues trying to apply etc... I practiced scenarios around after Fall finals for about 2 hours a day (didn't stop reading during this time) during the break. When school started, I did about an hour a day for the first few weeks until I get settled in my classes, then at least 1.5 hours on weekdays and at least 2 hours on weekends. I took a small break (a few weeks) where I didn't do anything since I was feeling crushed (see my post earlier to understand why). When I had about a week left... I did only practice/read for at least 8-10 hours a day.

 

All of this was during my public health degree at the UofA, where I was exposed to a lot more diverse courses/topics that really helped expand my mind on what health really means. I got to meet and work with some amazing people and it definitely made me a better person.

 

Your first question might be....... wtf? why so much? When I choked the first time and learned about my weaknesses both in terms of the interview and myself... I was so mad and frustrated at my own inability. I was depressed seeing my friends move forward and me being somewhat stuck. I never wanted to feel that way ever again, and the interview to me was a way of demonstrating my growth. I didn't care if I got in or not, I wanted to go in and made damn sure that this time around, I don't ever f@#$ up like I did the first time and prove to myself that I can be a capable physician. My stats was also on the low side, so to me the interview was EVERYTHING.

 

Some people with better stats probably don't have to do this... but when I helped train others who asked for my help... they all ended up getting in or waitlisted. My method attempts to give you a better chance... that's probably the best way I can describe it.

 

what resources can I use? where do I obtain those resources? there's very limited amount of information on these

 

Everything... prep courses, practice with friends, faculty, colleagues.... I also listed things I read and where you can start digging ... if you want even more specifics PM me.

 

For current medical students/accepted students only: what helped you the most and what did you do to improve your MMI scores? were they effective? if you could do it again, what would you do differently?

 

Certainly was effective for me and many others I helped. To be fair.... I didn't care what helped more or less... I was willing to fight tooth and nail to become better. It's like losing weight... some believe exercise is better, or dieting, or other types of lifestyle changes... but for those who did it all, would they care which is better? The results speak for themselves.

 

As for what I'd do differently... I wouldn't. I poured everything I had into it and would do it all over again. Learning more through reading, interactions, practice, all while becoming a better public health practitioner made me a better person without question. I wouldn't take anything away from it.

 

GOOD LUCK and keep fighting for that dream!

 

- G

 

EDIT: I wanted to clear up some potential confusion by adding some context and reasoning to what I did

 

By reading more you can incorporate more knowledge and understanding to future scenarios. For example... if you were asked about something like mental health care/stigma but don't know what that entails... what you'll end up talking about will have little depth and you can't bring in a relevant example that will help strengthen your answer. How will you know some of the responsibilities of a physician holistically if you don't shadow one, or read CanMEDS etc... list goes on and on.

 

For example: What's your opinion on having patients with disability pay for cybernetic limbs? --> you have to know what disability entails + consequences, HRQoL, what is cybernetics? how is our health system currently structured in terms of financing and funding availability? is it "medically necessary?" does cost conflict with "comprehensiveness?" .......... more knowledge will help you construct a better + balanced argument looking at various sides of an issue.

 

Lastly, read and be engaged.... many if not all of these topics are just SO fascinating... get used to reading a lot.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Good luck, 

 

- G

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As Bambi would say, the best prep for the MMIs are your life experiences. Throw yourself in uncomfortable situations cuz that's when you grow the most.

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My number one advice -- don't make getting into medical school the thing you think about all the time, the thing that keeps you south of normal. Enjoy life and keep yourself distracted, socialize with your friends and do fun things, meet strangers, form new connections. Still want medicine, of course, but also focus on the present and the other things that life has to offer. Once applications and interviews roll around, prepare and be your best self (be you!). You will one day get into medicine if you really want it, but when you do, you will reflect on the past and hopefully there won't be too many regrets.

This. You simply can't go into your interview believing that your world will fall apart if you don't get into medicine. Nurture and expand your hobbies, relationships, etc., and explore some alternative career paths so that you know you can be happy and fulfilled regardless of acceptance to med school. 

 

I know this is hard right now, but there are so many opportunities ahead of you this year. It is not wasted time, I promise. 

 

Good luck!  :)

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This may not be the type of answer you are looking for, but I will offer my opinion since you're looking for advice. I want to preface this by saying I am not at all meaning to seem insensitive and I can appreciate the struggle you're going through. I also very much acknowledge the willingness to do the work to improve yourself and your application. 

I have been following your posts for some time. I think you might want to take a look at yourself and how you approach and deal with things on a very broad level. While it's often beneficial to look at the process-type ways to improve your application, I think you need to take a look at how you deal with things on the daily. I think a professional therapeutic relationship would be a meaningful thing to look into for you. I think the growth you might be able to obtain through a therapeutic relationship may potentially show in how you approach your interviews next year, but may moreso allow you to approach situations on a broad level in a healthier way.

I think others have suggested some other practical ways to improve your application, above.

Again, my suggestion comes from the best place possible. Best of luck!

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I read Multiple Mini Interview for the Mind and did a lot of practice questions/sessions to gain feedback and learn from my mistakes. I'm a med student with a lower GPA than the typical accepted applicant so I found it very beneficial to have guidance in the process especially as a reapplicant.  Hang in there, things will work out.  

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Personally, I have found that an intense, hard-core approach to MMI prep only enhances the tense, anxious approach you describe struggling with in the past. 

I would recommend a more casual approach: since it sounds like you want to prep early, go ahead and start trying to read 1 or 2 articles a week on current issues both in health care and society at large, paying particular attention to how experts assess the various perspectives on an issue and taking note of any techniques that you find unique or interesting. 

Then in October or November start doing an evening of 3 or 4 practice scenarios once a week - I would recommend starting with someone you're really comfortable with and ease into the process until you feel confident and then start practising with strangers. This might help minimize the anxiety associated with MMI.

In addition to feedback from others, film yourself to see if there are any bad habits that you pick up on. 

Then with this solid foundation, I would increase practising to ~3 nights a week in January and leading up to interviews. 

Overall: do everything you can to minimize the stress associated with interviews! I think that obsessive practice trying to perfect your technique tends to increase anxiety and stress, which shows in the interview and negates any benefit gained in other aspects of your answer. For me, this meant preparing well (as described above), making a solid back up plan I was excited for if med school didn't work out this year (minimizing the importance of the interview), and then I took a complete break and didn't practice at all in the 4 days leading up to the interview knowing that I had prepared well to the best of my ability. 

I would echo the concern of Borborygmi - you seem to have taken this rejection really hard and I hope you're doing ok and have friends, family, or other support systems you can talk to during the ups and downs of med applications.

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4 hours ago, YesIcan55 said:

Thank you for the reply. Where do you recommend I read the articles from? 

Personally I liked the BBC for world news (they have sections on science and health), I signed up for the World Health Organization newsletter on public health matters, and read the Vancouver Sun to keep up on matters specific to Vancouver. I follow @kevinmd and @AmerMedicalAssn on Twitter who both frequently tweet interesting articles.

I also read a few books, one of my favourites was In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts by Gabor Maté. It's a really good read if you're interested in addictions medicine and how it relates to mental health and STDs. 

My dad is also a doctor so I have the fortune of frequently meeting his colleagues and I made a habit of asking them what current issues in the healthcare system they felt were really important and if there were any they thought were flying under the radar - that gave me lots of new ideas for reading up on.

Finally, consider keeping up on politics. It might be coincidence, but in both years interviewing at UBC, I had great opportunities to work my knowledge of relevant political issues into answers and ended up feeling that those were some of my best stations!

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On 5/31/2017 at 5:56 PM, OwnerOfTheTARDIS said:

Personally I liked the BBC for world news (they have sections on science and health), I signed up for the World Health Organization newsletter on public health matters, and read the Vancouver Sun to keep up on matters specific to Vancouver. I follow @kevinmd and @AmerMedicalAssn on Twitter who both frequently tweet interesting articles.

I also read a few books, one of my favourites was In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts by Gabor Maté. It's a really good read if you're interested in addictions medicine and how it relates to mental health and STDs. 

My dad is also a doctor so I have the fortune of frequently meeting his colleagues and I made a habit of asking them what current issues in the healthcare system they felt were really important and if there were any they thought were flying under the radar - that gave me lots of new ideas for reading up on.

Finally, consider keeping up on politics. It might be coincidence, but in both years interviewing at UBC, I had great opportunities to work my knowledge of relevant political issues into answers and ended up feeling that those were some of my best stations!

Oh and may I add to this that the BBC World Service Radio, which you can stream online, is just a generally amazing resource. 

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If anyone is interested for some help with the MMI, message me! I personally think that they are a few ways to improve your interview performance, particularly if you're someone who feels very stressed and at a lost of words under high pressure situations. 

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On 6/28/2017 at 11:21 PM, doctorUBC said:

If anyone is interested for some help with the MMI, message me! I personally think that they are a few ways to improve your interview performance, particularly if you're someone who feels very stressed and at a lost of words under high pressure situations. 

May I add I found the breathing and mindfulness techniques from Yoga very helpful for all kinds of stressful situations and, in particular, interview scenarios.

 

 

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I was in the same situation as you last year (20th~ percentile for MMI, only applied to one school). This school year I started prepping from october, applied to 3 schools (manitoba/bc/alberta) and got accepted to 2/3 of them. I don't think preparing a lot is bad especially if you don't think you have a natural proclivity for them! By the final two months I was doing around 5 questions a day, reviewing my answers afterwards, and meeting up with 2-3 people a week in addition to that.

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OwnerOfTheTARDIS gave some good practical advice.

You need to be both authentic and relaxed going into the MMI. In my view, overprep is a big mistake.

Although you won't follow this advice, going into the MMI, treat the entire session as a practice session! As if it doesn't matter and you simply go in with the attitude to have fun and do your best. This simple advice has gotten many repeat interviewees through to acceptance! And treat the interviewer like an intelligent 12 year old who is inquisitive and whom you wish to give a thorough explanation. Going in with a positive attitude, without anxiety, makes a huge difference in your performance.

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It's great you're taking the MMI so seriously, as you should, but IMHO this is not an effective mindset and approach.

Take your thread title for example: "Long term hardcore MMI prep".  The whole idea of the MMI is to see qualities beyond that of your academics - it's not something you can "hardcore" study or practice for.  You need to relax, and not only appear authentic, but be authentic.

As for your 4th question: "are there right answers to MMI questions?" Ironically, that seems the be the underlying premise of most MMI questions; when presented with a complex topic/situation, is there an absolute right solution? We're not world leaders or visionaries - the interviewer isn't looking so much for the answer as they are looking for your process to the "right" answer.  What makes a good MMI answer IMO isn't your structured solution to poverty, for example, but it's your ability to carefully consider and examine the complex nature of the topic in a thoughtful manner before arriving at said solution.  Why did you think there was a "right answer", yet you disagreed with? Is the "right answer" the answer you see as more socially acceptable? Do you understand why it's more socially acceptable? Are you disagreeing based on a in-depth understanding and examination of the topic, or is it a knee-jerk reaction borne of ignorance of the topic? If you think you truly have an understanding of the topic and still disagree with what you perceive as the "right answer", you should work on showing your thought process and understanding, and dissect it in a way that will make the interviewer see merit in your assessment.  If you disagree simply because it doesn't feel right, but you don't have much understanding of the topic, OwnerOfTheTardis has some solid advice on expanding your scope and perspective on world issues.  I'll add my twist to it: use Twitter not as a social media platform, but as a News aggregate. The character limit provides good concise headlines for you to browse through everything before focusing on one or two articles.  Follow a few different news agencies: BBC, CBC, CNN, NBC, Fox etc and don't forget local news too.  Following and reading news from different agencies, even ones with a political and social leaning you may not agree with, will give you varying perspectives on the same topic, either in their obvious headline or in the undertone of the article.  Scroll through your Twitter feed multiple times a day, on the bus or during lunch, and click the ones you want to read. Take it a step further - talk to your friends.  See what they think on these issues.  Once you start doing this, you'll learn to be more open in your perspectives and more comfortable to engaging in a genuine conversation with a hint of passion in your voice.  This, along with casual practice closer to the date, will give you a much smoother experience in your next MMI than "hardcore long term MMI prep".

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Lots of really good advice on here already, but much of it is really focused on review and practice on your own time. In addition to this, I think something that's helpful to a lot of people is to find ways to expand your experience talking to other people about complicated issues. I don't mean practicing MMI questions with other med hopefuls. I mean just talking to smart people about tough issues and having in-depth discussions. 

You could do this in a formal way: E.g., you could take a humanities course or an ethics course that's heavily in-person and discussion based, and which would force you to practice analyzing unfamiliar issues and framing arguments to your peers.  Or you could do it in a more informal way, such as by joining a book club or a meet up group that deals with topics you're interested in. 

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17 hours ago, frenchpress said:

Lots of really good advice on here already, but much of it is really focused on review and practice on your own time. In addition to this, I think something that's helpful to a lot of people is to find ways to expand your experience talking to other people about complicated issues. I don't mean practicing MMI questions with other med hopefuls. I mean just talking to smart people about tough issues and having in-depth discussions. 

You could do this in a formal way: E.g., you could take a humanities course or an ethics course that's heavily in-person and discussion based, and which would force you to practice analyzing unfamiliar issues and framing arguments to your peers.  Or you could do it in a more informal way, such as by joining a book club or a meet up group that deals with topics you're interested in. 

Thanks for this suggestion frenchpress - really good idea!

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On 7/26/2017 at 7:15 AM, Bambi said:

OwnerOfTheTARDIS gave some good practical advice.

You need to be both authentic and relaxed going into the MMI. In my view, overprep is a big mistake.

Although you won't follow this advice, going into the MMI, treat the entire session as a practice session! As if it doesn't matter and you simply go in with the attitude to have fun and do your best. This simple advice has gotten many repeat interviewees through to acceptance! And treat the interviewer like an intelligent 12 year old who is inquisitive and whom you wish to give a thorough explanation. Going in with a positive attitude, without anxiety, makes a huge difference in your performance.

Hi Bambi, thanks for this. Was wondering of you know of any specific anxiety techniques for interview that you may have come across. I think this will be my number one challenge!

 

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Butterflies in the tummy are the norm entering the first station. Others may contribute in answering your question, but I am in the dark on this one. I was involved in the performing arts for years and years, and I just got a grip on myself and performed. Of course, in these situations, I was thoroughly prepared. For the MMI, I considered that I had prepared for my entire life, I had been in all sorts of difficult situations and I felt I could handle anything they threw at me. In other words, it was mind over matter. Fear of the unknown is normal, perhaps you need to talk to yourself, tell yourself this is normal and also irrational, and talk yourself out of it. I am a third year surgical resident and I look forward to entering the O.R. every time and am excited by the challenge of doing a new procedure. My point is: we encounter challenges every day, some are more important than others, however, we need to have confidence that we will be the best whom we are and then, let the chips fall where they may. Anxiety can inhibit performance. In the worst case scenario, you will not be selected, you will have experienced the MMI and this can only herlp you for the future. Go in there with confidence in yourself and be the best of which you are capable. Regardless of the outcome, you are a winner!

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On 8/23/2017 at 5:36 PM, Bambi said:

Butterflies in the tummy are the norm entering the first station. Others may contribute in answering your question, but I am in the dark on this one. I was involved in the performing arts for years and years, and I just got a grip on myself and performed. Of course, in these situations, I was thoroughly prepared. For the MMI, I considered that I had prepared for my entire life, I had been in all sorts of difficult situations and I felt I could handle anything they threw at me. In other words, it was mind over matter. Fear of the unknown is normal, perhaps you need to talk to yourself, tell yourself this is normal and also irrational, and talk yourself out of it. I am a third year surgical resident and I look forward to entering the O.R. every time and am excited by the challenge of doing a new procedure. My point is: we encounter challenges every day, some are more important than others, however, we need to have confidence that we will be the best whom we are and then, let the chips fall where they may. Anxiety can inhibit performance. In the worst case scenario, you will not be selected, you will have experienced the MMI and this can only herlp you for the future. Go in there with confidence in yourself and be the best of which you are capable. Regardless of the outcome, you are a winner!

Thanks for your reply - much appreciated and lots of wise words.

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On 5/30/2017 at 9:10 PM, Jess85 said:

I read Multiple Mini Interview for the Mind and did a lot of practice questions/sessions to gain feedback and learn from my mistakes. I'm a med student with a lower GPA than the typical accepted applicant so I found it very beneficial to have guidance in the process especially as a reapplicant.  Hang in there, things will work out.  

Thanks for the tip. Just started to read this and have found it great so far! :-) 

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On 6/28/2017 at 10:03 AM, Pippa756 said:

Oh and may I add to this that the BBC World Service Radio, which you can stream online, is just a generally amazing resource. 

Love the World Service :-)

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On 8/23/2017 at 5:36 PM, Bambi said:

Butterflies in the tummy are the norm entering the first station. Others may contribute in answering your question, but I am in the dark on this one. I was involved in the performing arts for years and years, and I just got a grip on myself and performed. Of course, in these situations, I was thoroughly prepared. For the MMI, I considered that I had prepared for my entire life, I had been in all sorts of difficult situations and I felt I could handle anything they threw at me. In other words, it was mind over matter. Fear of the unknown is normal, perhaps you need to talk to yourself, tell yourself this is normal and also irrational, and talk yourself out of it. I am a third year surgical resident and I look forward to entering the O.R. every time and am excited by the challenge of doing a new procedure. My point is: we encounter challenges every day, some are more important than others, however, we need to have confidence that we will be the best whom we are and then, let the chips fall where they may. Anxiety can inhibit performance. In the worst case scenario, you will not be selected, you will have experienced the MMI and this can only herlp you for the future. Go in there with confidence in yourself and be the best of which you are capable. Regardless of the outcome, you are a winner!

Very inspiring, like you final comment - easy to get down over these things and feel like a loser. All these assessments are highly competitive and difficult!

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