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Hello everyone,

It's this time of the year where application deadline are coming. I am from Marianopolis and I am unsure of my final R-Score because my 3rd semester was a very bad one for two of my classes, especially with organic chemistry (R-score still hasn't come out yet though). The first two semester, I had a decent R-score of around 33. Also, I did some volunteering, about 60 hours but I'm pretty sure it's not enough to make my CV look good. I used to be very confident in my skills but after the 3rd semester, I am not sure of my future for med anymore. Anyways, that is not the main question here.

I know that if I don't make it to Med-P from Cegep, I can apply to an alternate undergrad studies where I will have a chance to get into medecine once I completed it. However, I am very hesitant on which program to chose. I heard some people saying that applying to Physiotherapy would be a good idea to transfer. But I am not sure what is the impact of the chosen undergrad plan b program for my career for medecine. Should I chose a science-based program to get an advantage if I get into med? I am rather new to this and I am quite confused about the large number of program at university (and a bit intimidated).

Nonetheless, I am trying hard to pursue my dream to get into med, like most people in this forum. It seems very arduous, but I am giving everything I got. I hope you guys can give me some tips and guidance for the path I must take (in particular, for my plan B undergrad program). 

Sincerely,
Jacky.

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If you're aiming for McGill, the undergrad you choose will have no impact on your chances of getting accepted. The only two factors you'd need to consider is your interest and relative difficulty of the program. 

The French schools do discriminate based on the program however. PT and other professional programs have an advantage. I suggest you look that up or ask on their forums to see what's best. 

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Does anyone know some not so hard undergrad program suggestions? Is physiotherapy difficult? I heard that kinesiology is fine, but I'm not sure.

And SunAndMoon, you said that french schools discriminate based on the program. So I am better off choosing science program right?

 

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Jacky, I recommend the specialty program in Exercise Science @ Concordia which gives you internships with elderly having chronic diseases, thereby allowing you to apply your knowledge and have experience with clients. It is not difficult but the material is voluminous - so you have to work hard throughout to be a straight A student. Many graduates of this program have gotten into med school, the franco schools, although McGill is equally possible.

Read through all the posts of this thread:

 

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Wait everyone, can you clear up some questions for me. I am confused a bit. When choosing an undergrad, I saw some people talking about connexe and non-connexe. What does it means? Does some programs don't cover enough pre-requisite for Med, so I have to do those required courses in extra? Or is it something else?

Thank you in advance!

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36 minutes ago, Jacky Wang said:

Wait everyone, can you clear up some questions for me. I am confused a bit. When choosing an undergrad, I saw some people talking about connexe and non-connexe. What does it means? Does some programs don't cover enough pre-requisite for Med, so I have to do those required courses in extra? Or is it something else?

Thank you in advance!

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the connexe VS non-connexe distinction is for the French schools only, not for McGill. The way it works is that if you're coming from a bac connexe, you can directly go into 1st year of med school upon admission, but if you're non-connexe, you have to do the Med-P year first even if you already have a bac. I believe UdeM has different streams for connexe and non-connexe, and it's somewhat more competitive to get in as a non-connexe applicant.

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15 hours ago, MedP111 said:

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the connexe VS non-connexe distinction is for the French schools only, not for McGill. The way it works is that if you're coming from a bac connexe, you can directly go into 1st year of med school upon admission, but if you're non-connexe, you have to do the Med-P year first even if you already have a bac. I believe UdeM has different streams for connexe and non-connexe, and it's somewhat more competitive to get in as a non-connexe applicant.

Thats correct. From the statistics, there are less spots for non-connexe which explains why its more competitve. You should email the admission to validate if the undergrad you choose is considered connexe, it’ll make a difference once you apply. They have a list of connexe undergrads here: https://medecine.umontreal.ca/etudes/doctorat-en-medecine/futurs-etudiants/types-de-candidats/candidat-universitaire-quebecois/

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Interesting question. It has already been answered. However, the exercise program I recommend, which is an excellent prep for medicine, believe it or not, is considered non-connexe by UdeM - which means 5 years and not 4 years. And the preparatory one year program is a repeat of what you already learned. Truth is stranger than fiction sometimes, and this is for sure such an example.

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1 hour ago, Cheers2life said:

Thats correct. From the statistics, there are less spots for non-connexe which explains why its more competitve. You should email the admission to validate if the undergrad you choose is considered connexe, it’ll make a difference once you apply. They have a list of connexe undergrads here: https://medecine.umontreal.ca/etudes/doctorat-en-medecine/futurs-etudiants/types-de-candidats/candidat-universitaire-quebecois/

If I understand clearly, the undergrad programs that I do doesn't for applying to Med at McGill, unlike french schools such as UdeM. From this point of view, it seems to be wiser to chose a connexe program right, am I right? Since it will allow me a better chance at both McGill and UdeM.

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No, you are not right. Non connexe is a UdeM creation applying only at UdeM. You do not have a clue where lightning will strike, Laval, Sherby, UdeM or McGill. UdeM is the only one that could require a preparatory year, whereas the others do not. Moreover, the UdeM preparatory year is not a wasted year, rather it gives you a good background with which to enter med school. This is not a race, rather, it is a marathon and a year over a lifetime is not only no big deal, it can give you greater confidence for med school  due to familiarity with terms, concepts and you are not entering totally blind, although those who have no prep will survive notwithstanding that first year will be a brutal experience. However, nothing prepares you for residency! And the preparatory year is way better than the Med-P route.

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Maybe you could benefit from speaking with an academic counsellor at Marianopolis? Choosing a university program can seem daunting, especially if you want to strategize for med school afterwards. As others have said, for McGill, it really doesn't matter where or what you study, as long as you do really well. However, the French schools will consider the difficulty of your program (ie, PT > Biology) when considering your GPA. Majors that seem to be popular among med hopefuls are Exercise Science at Concordia, and Anatomy & Cell Biology at McGill. Some programs are more challenging to get high grades in (ie, Physiology at McGill), so you should consider that if your primary goal is to get top marks. Also keep in mind that you don't have to choose a Science undergraduate program to get into med school. You just need the basic science prerequisite courses. In fact, I think you could argue that choosing a non-Science program makes you stand out against a sea of applicants with BSc's. Or, you could consider doing a double major, or even a minor in a non-Science discipline. There are a million paths to med school. If you do end up doing an undergrad, use the opportunity to explore your interests. You'll probably get better grades studying something you find interesting, and you'll have more to talk about in your med school interviews. Good luck! 

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I already asked Bambi about this but he doesn't remember about it so I'll ask it here.

I have a question regarding the fourth semester at Cegep. I was wondering what was the impact of the fourth semester grades and R-Score has on, say, my future career at University. I heard my friends said that the fourth semester is only meant to be passed, no need to excel in every class. However, I personally had a very bad third semester, especially with organic chemistry. Should I try my best in the fourth semester if it isn't all in vain?

 

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36 minutes ago, Jacky Wang said:

I already asked Bambi about this but he doesn't remember about it so I'll ask it here.

I have a question regarding the fourth semester at Cegep. I was wondering what was the impact of the fourth semester grades and R-Score has on, say, my future career at University. I heard my friends said that the fourth semester is only meant to be passed, no need to excel in every class. However, I personally had a very bad third semester, especially with organic chemistry. Should I try my best in the fourth semester if it isn't all in vain?

 

4th semester doesn't count in your R score for the fall application cycle (2018 for instance) as it is for university applicants for their last semester. But it will for the next application cycle (2019) if you don't get in whatever program you're aiming this year. I would say just try to do as good as any other semester, you never know what could happen and you sure dont want any regrets. 

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10 minutes ago, Cheers2life said:

4th semester doesn't count in your R score for the fall application cycle (2018 for instance) as it is for university applicants for their last semester. But it will for the next application cycle (2019) if you don't get in whatever program you're aiming this year. I would say just try to do as good as any other semester, you never know what could happen and you sure dont want any regrets. 

Is that so? What do you mean by next application cycle (2019)? Like if for example, I get accepted for an undergrad program instead of Med-P, and I chose to pursue that path for the time being, the next application cycle, I might apply for Med-P again? Or do you mean that if I can't make it to any program, I should still have a good 4th semester in order to get a better chance for next year?

Thank you btw for your answer.

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8 minutes ago, Snowmen said:

If you apply after a single year (at Sherbrooke for instance), your R-score would still count as roughly 70% of your application, including your 4th semester.

For what specifically? Med-P?

Also, can someone clear up some of my misconceptions for Med-P at McGill. I read their website but I'm still unsure. Of course, I know Med-P is a preparatory program for Med School. But I don't get when people say that you can get to Med from Cegep. What does it mean, like once you're in Med-P, you are sure to be able to follow your studies in Med School or what?

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1 hour ago, Jacky Wang said:

For what specifically? Med-P?

For any program. Since you're sending your transcript around march (for cegep) your final grades from the classes you're actually taking are not going to be available before may, so universities won't see those grades. But they will as snowmen said, if you attend 1 year of university and then try again for medicine of anything else. Hope thats clear.

Also, can someone clear up some of my misconceptions for Med-P at McGill. I read their website but I'm still unsure. Of course, I know Med-P is a preparatory program for Med School. But I don't get when people say that you can get to Med from Cegep. What does it mean, like once you're in Med-P, you are sure to be able to follow your studies in Med School or what?

Correct. Once you're in Med-P you have to successfully pass all your classes to get «promoted» to next year and so on for the rest of the curriculum. 

 

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