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Western panel interview

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Hello everyone

I was wondering if anyone can provide any tips on how to prepare for Western's panel interview ? Are there any specific resources you guys found helpful for this particular interview? I gathered that Western's panel seems to be relatively conversational and less intense overall compared to others .

I'm not quite sure how much time to dedicate to practice situation/ethical MMI-style questions since it's not a MMI ? I'm also wondering to what extent did you guys incorporate your EC's and life experiences into your answers ? I'm asking because I feel like emphasizing EC's here is crucial since the interview is closed file.

I would appreciate any tips since this is my only interview so far this cycle and with a relatively lower MCAT/GPA combo, I feel like I really need to kill the interview!

Thanks

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All you can do is know your CV well, your experiences, your accomplishments, try to see them in light of CanMeds, your difficulties, and prepare for the common intw questions that could come up, like why you, why medicine, tell me about a time where... etc etc

Some questions you can't really prepare for but they are not that bad at all. 

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I don't think it would be a surprise for anyone doing an interview at any of the schools that you should know the Can med roles and think about events in your life where you demonstrated those roles. 

These is all very general interview advice but there are basically 5 types of questions any panel interview would ask

1) Who are you/tell me about yourself. Have a blurb ready - but keep in mind it probably won't be worth all that much because they know you in fact have it ready. Not much marks for prepared speeches ha. Mostly want to make sure you aren't a robot here, and try to break the ice. 

2) Give me an example of when you demonstrated can med role X. Because I know you know the can med roles I may not use the exact same name of the role but when you think about it will be the same thing. Don't know the roles and you might be in trouble. Don't know the roles AND have not reflected on your life experience/ how they relate and you might be in even more trouble.

3) Here is an ethics scenario - detail both positions and the ethical issues/concepts at play (at least two of them will be in direct opposition, i.e. autonomy vs social justice), MAKE A DECISION and then do what you can minimize harm to all the parties within that decision. For fun I might change aspects of the scenario after to see how that impacts your decision and you better still be consistent and not fall apart. Also remember they will make it sound like you are alone in the universe making that decision.....and you never are, and there is almost never the slightest time pressure in the real world either. Reading doing right helps but remember in that book the author defines the terms and give examples - but what is not there a lot is actually the concepts fighting each other. There is a big difference between figuring out what ethical terms apply, versus figuring out how to use them to describe your position in a complex ethical scenario. 

4) Here is a problem in health care - how would you fix it. Overlaps a bit sometimes with 3). Doesn't hurt to have an idea of the major issues in health care, and also how you might solve them. Some schools have regional focuses - that means regional issues. 

5) Let's give your some bizarre task or role playing scenario to try and freak you out. Then let's see if you do in fact freak out (note - the entire point of this is to stress you, so EVERYONE else doing the interview will also be stressed - remember it is just a game. It is going to be awkward, roll with it. You don't have to be completely non stressed - you have to be less stressed than some of the other interviewees). To prepare for this you have actually similarly done scenarios that are designed to do that same thing. 

 

 

Edited by rmorelan

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5 hours ago, rmorelan said:

I don't think it would be a surprise for anyone doing an interview at any of the schools that you should know the Can med roles and think about events in your life where you demonstrated that roles. 

These is all very general interview advice but there are basically 5 types of questions any panel interview would ask

1) Who are you/tell me about yourself. Have a blurb ready - but keep in mind it probably won't be worth all that much because they know you in fact have it ready. Not much marks for prepared speeches ha. Mostly want to make sure you aren't a robot here, and try to break the ice. 

2) Give me an example of when you demonstrated can med role X. Because I know you know the can med roles I may not use the exact same name of the role but when you think about it will be the same thing. Don't know the roles and you might be in trouble. Don't know the roles AND have not reflected on your life experience/ how they relate and you might be in even more trouble.

3) Here is an ethics scenario - detail both positions and the ethical issues/concepts at play (at least two of them will be in direct opposition, i.e. autonomy vs social justice), MAKE A DECISION and then do what you can minimize harm to all the parties within that decision. For fun I might change aspects of the scenario after to see how that impacts your decision and you better still be consistent and not fall apart. Also remember they will make it sound like you are alone in the universe making that decision.....and you never are, and there is almost never the slightest time pressure in the real world either. Reading doing right helps but remember in that book the author defines the terms and give examples - but what is not there a lot is actually the concepts fighting each other. There is a big difference between figuring out what ethical terms apply, versus figuring out how to use them to describe your position in a complex ethical scenario. 

4) Here is a problem in health care - how would you fix it. Overlaps a bit sometimes with 3). Doesn't hurt to have an idea of the major issues in health care, and also how you might solve them. Some schools have regional focuses - that means regional issues. 

5) Let's give your some bizarre task or role playing scenario to try and freak you out. Then let's see if you do in fact freak out (note - the entire point of this is to stress you, so EVERYONE else doing the interview will also be stressed - remember it is just a game. It is going to be awkward, roll with it. You don't have to be completely non stressed - you have to be less stressed than some of the other interviewees). To prepare for this you have actually similarly do scenarios that are designed to do that same thing. 

 

 

could you please give an example of number 5?

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On 2/10/2018 at 3:30 PM, smac said:

could you please give an example of number 5?

oh some of those are on the web as sample questions - I mean the classic one is quick tell me what kind of vegetable you would want to be and why? or role playing scenarios similar to some MMI questions - you hit a car and the person is furious with you about it and you have to deal with that etc.

the point is examples aren't really all that useful in a sense directly as the entire point is it will be a novel stressful situation - the content is completely meaningless- I don't care that you want to be a carrot - I want to know that you don't fold under pressure, because medicine is a stressful job and you are under pressure all the time.

I can also use it to test you for communication skills, empathy etc.

 

Edited by rmorelan

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On 2018-02-10 at 10:29 AM, rmorelan said:

I don't think it would be a surprise for anyone doing an interview at any of the schools that you should know the Can med roles and think about events in your life where you demonstrated those roles. 

These is all very general interview advice but there are basically 5 types of questions any panel interview would ask

1) Who are you/tell me about yourself. Have a blurb ready - but keep in mind it probably won't be worth all that much because they know you in fact have it ready. Not much marks for prepared speeches ha. Mostly want to make sure you aren't a robot here, and try to break the ice. 

2) Give me an example of when you demonstrated can med role X. Because I know you know the can med roles I may not use the exact same name of the role but when you think about it will be the same thing. Don't know the roles and you might be in trouble. Don't know the roles AND have not reflected on your life experience/ how they relate and you might be in even more trouble.

3) Here is an ethics scenario - detail both positions and the ethical issues/concepts at play (at least two of them will be in direct opposition, i.e. autonomy vs social justice), MAKE A DECISION and then do what you can minimize harm to all the parties within that decision. For fun I might change aspects of the scenario after to see how that impacts your decision and you better still be consistent and not fall apart. Also remember they will make it sound like you are alone in the universe making that decision.....and you never are, and there is almost never the slightest time pressure in the real world either. Reading doing right helps but remember in that book the author defines the terms and give examples - but what is not there a lot is actually the concepts fighting each other. There is a big difference between figuring out what ethical terms apply, versus figuring out how to use them to describe your position in a complex ethical scenario. 

4) Here is a problem in health care - how would you fix it. Overlaps a bit sometimes with 3). Doesn't hurt to have an idea of the major issues in health care, and also how you might solve them. Some schools have regional focuses - that means regional issues. 

5) Let's give your some bizarre task or role playing scenario to try and freak you out. Then let's see if you do in fact freak out (note - the entire point of this is to stress you, so EVERYONE else doing the interview will also be stressed - remember it is just a game. It is going to be awkward, roll with it. You don't have to be completely non stressed - you have to be less stressed than some of the other interviewees). To prepare for this you have actually similarly done scenarios that are designed to do that same thing. 

 

 

Thank you so much @rmorelan ! Your posts are always helpful (especially those related to UWO haha).

I'm just a bit worried because I know a couple of SWOMEN people who ended up on a low waitlist last cycle and I haven't received other interviews so far. Not to mention I'd also really like to stay at Western too so hopefully it all goes well! 

 

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On 2/11/2018 at 4:08 PM, MD9511 said:

Thank you so much @rmorelan ! Your posts are always helpful (especially those related to UWO haha).

I'm just a bit worried because I know a couple of SWOMEN people who ended up on a low waitlist last cycle and I haven't received other interviews so far. Not to mention I'd also really like to stay at Western too so hopefully it all goes well! 

 

SWOMEN is no guarantee of course - and regardless of your status you have to do what you think you have to do to prepare. It is a very nice bonus though and will help a lot. Best of luck!

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Thanks for another informative post @rmorelan, you have been a massive help!

Quick question:

On 10/02/2018 at 11:29 AM, rmorelan said:

3) [...] For fun I might change aspects of the scenario after to see how that impacts your decision and you better still be consistent and not fall apart

What do you mean by this? Surely changing aspects of the scenario can very much change your decision, since the new context should be considered into your decision-making process. 

e.g. 80 y/o woman deemed competent wishes to refuse cancer treatment that healthcare professionals believe are her only chance to live past the next year. Should you respect her wishes?

Then, the interviewer changes the scenario, and now the patient is deemed incompetent and depressed. Surely with this new information, we would want to make some revisions to our decision, no?

Thanks for your time!

 

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18 minutes ago, VanillaUK said:

Thanks for another informative post @rmorelan, you have been a massive help!

Quick question:

What do you mean by this? Surely changing aspects of the scenario can very much change your decision, since the new context should be considered into your decision-making process. 

e.g. 80 y/o woman deemed competent wishes to refuse cancer treatment that healthcare professionals believe are her only chance to live past the next year. Should you respect her wishes?

Then, the interviewer changes the scenario, and now the patient is deemed incompetent and depressed. Surely with this new information, we would want to make some revisions to our decision, no?

Thanks for your time!

 

consistent in approach and consideration of the ethical factors - not necessarily consistent in your conclusions (in fact as you rightly point out that would be stupid). 

so in your example for instance we can actually see where that would apply - let's say in the first part you say I believe patient autonomy is the most important factor over other pressures (a real scenario would have other factors as right now it is too simple to test you - something like the treatment is completely curative for instance, the family wants her to be treated, the cost of her care without treatment is vastly expensive compared to treatment or a hundred other variations :) )

So you now you are told she is depressed and incompetent and the family still wants her to do the treatment.  The simple answer it blindly say she is incompetent and the now family is the proxy that acts in her place (or you act if there is no one else) and be done. The better answer is if you value autonomy so much is well can you fix the incompetence? - reverse the depression for instance? 

Some people when the modifications come lose focus - they think the interviewer is guiding me towards an answer and fell they have to change things. They flop all over the place - usually spouting ethical terms without understanding of how they work together. External forces are exactly what shouldn't change you position - what examiner thinks is not important, they are testing how you reason through various ethical issues, come up with an answer and have enough strength to both change with new information with in your ethical approach and also not change just because you are being pressured. The latter is important as in the real world you will be pressured, and pressured harder than you probably have every been pressured in anything before - that family for instance above would want that treatment and really push you to override with all force they can bear. Can you keep your focus, adjust but only when logical to do so, and weather the storm?

 

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3 minutes ago, rmorelan said:

consistent in approach and consideration of the ethical factors - not necessarily consistent in your conclusions (in fact as you rightly point out that would be stupid). 

so in your example for instance we can actually see where that would apply - let's say in the first part you say I believe patient autonomy is the most important factor over other pressures (a real scenario would have other factors as right now it is too simple to test you - something like the treatment is completely curative for instance, the family wants her to be treated, the cost of her care without treatment is vastly expensive compared to treatment or a hundred other variations :) )

So you now you are told she is depressed and incompetent and the family still wants her to do the treatment.  The simple answer it blindly say she is incompetent and the now family is the proxy that acts in her place (or you act if there is no one else) and be done. The better answer is if you value autonomy so much is well can you fix the incompetence? - reverse the depression for instance? 

Some people when the modifications come lose focus - they think the interviewer is guiding me towards an answer and fell they have to change things. They flop all over the place - usually spouting ethical terms without understanding of how they work together. External forces are exactly what shouldn't change you position - what examiner thinks is not important, they are testing how you reason through various ethical issues, come up with an answer and have enough strength to both change with new information with in your ethical approach and also not change just because you are being pressured. The latter is important as in the real world you will be pressured, and pressured harder than you probably have every been pressured in anything before - that family for instance above would want that treatment and really push you to override with all force they can bear. Can you keep your focus, adjust but only when logical to do so, and weather the storm?

 

Ah I see what you're getting at, this makes total sense. Thank you for your thoughtful response!

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On 2018-02-07 at 8:44 PM, MD9511 said:

Hello everyone

I was wondering if anyone can provide any tips on how to prepare for Western's panel interview ? Are there any specific resources you guys found helpful for this particular interview? I gathered that Western's panel seems to be relatively conversational and less intense overall compared to others .

I'm not quite sure how much time to dedicate to practice situation/ethical MMI-style questions since it's not a MMI ? I'm also wondering to what extent did you guys incorporate your EC's and life experiences into your answers ? I'm asking because I feel like emphasizing EC's here is crucial since the interview is closed file.

I would appreciate any tips since this is my only interview so far this cycle and with a relatively lower MCAT/GPA combo, I feel like I really need to kill the interview!

Thanks

Does Western do an MMI interview format? On the interview invite attachment I am only seeing a 45-minute panel and a written component. Does anyone have more information on interview format?

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12 minutes ago, Thecharm said:

Does Western do an MMI interview format? On the interview invite attachment I am only seeing a 45-minute panel and a written component. Does anyone have more information on interview format?

You can find that on the forum - classically it is not an MMI but a panel interview. 

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