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PeterPatting

Things NOT to do as an interviewee (Interviewer perspectives welcome!)

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Will be interviewing in a few days! Looking for any annoying verbal/non-verbal stuff that interviewees should really try not to do (ie saying "um" too much, touching your face etc...). Any appropriate anecdotes that you would be willing to share (in as confidential a manner as possible) would also be very appreciated!!

Thanks!

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Do not fake an accent, as someone on here recommended against.

But really, do conduct yourself the way you would for a presentation, like you mentioned. These things are hard to control for during the interview as nerves will get to you, but I'm sure the interviewer is aware of that. As long as "ums" and distracting mannerisms don't get in the way of you expressing what you want to say, you should be fine. In the end, you will act only as good as your natural self is

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Hopefully these tips help:

Be yourself & go with the flow - don't get annoyed or frustrated. Everything they do is intended to challenge your communication/problem solving skills, but they are judging your professionalism the entire time. It has to come first, always. (it seems obvious, but has to be said. Every year people are disqualified for lack of professionalism at interviews). And remember your manners - introductions, and thanking the interviewer for their time.

Don't look like you hate the interviewer, or the interview, or the question... Try to look like you are having fun. 

Wear a dark shirt in case you spill water on yourself... true story! :lol: 

Try to bring in personal stories as they are memorable for interviewers and give a snapshot of who you are :) 

I definitely had some mannerisms that the interviewers would have noticed, but they know we are all so nervous. Honestly, it really seemed like it was what I was saying that counted, but... who knows?     #Mayiscoming

Best of luck!!

 

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2 hours ago, Koopatroopa said:

Hopefully these tips help:

Be yourself & go with the flow - don't get annoyed or frustrated. Everything they do is intended to challenge your communication/problem solving skills, but they are judging your professionalism the entire time. It has to come first, always. (it seems obvious, but has to be said. Every year people are disqualified for lack of professionalism at interviews). And remember your manners - introductions, and thanking the interviewer for their time.

Don't look like you hate the interviewer, or the interview, or the question... Try to look like you are having fun. 

Wear a dark shirt in case you spill water on yourself... true story! :lol: 

Try to bring in personal stories as they are memorable for interviewers and give a snapshot of who you are :) 

I definitely had some mannerisms that the interviewers would have noticed, but they know we are all so nervous. Honestly, it really seemed like it was what I was saying that counted, but... who knows?     #Mayiscoming

Best of luck!!

 

Thanks Koopatroopa! Hmmm I wonder if they ever try to "test" your professionalism - ie say something they know is flag-worthy and see if you'll engage (and get disqualified) or if you'll redirect the conversation

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17 hours ago, PeterPatting said:

Thanks Koopatroopa! Hmmm I wonder if they ever try to "test" your professionalism - ie say something they know is flag-worthy and see if you'll engage (and get disqualified) or if you'll redirect the conversation

No worries! :) 

I never had anything like that happen. They don’t seem like they are trying to trick you, they just want to give you scenarios that will challenge your communication. 

I’ve had some frustrating scenarios where the interviewer is uncooperative with the task or gives you harsh feedback. 

I’ve always felt like overall the interviewers were on my side - not trying to make me mess up. If that makes sense?

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After finishing one of my stations I had about a minute left. I was in a friendly mood and the interviewer was doing his own thing. I decided to ask him if he was from Iran because he had the accent. He simply said no and smiled. I am still kind of regretting this, but oh well I really don't think this was a big deal. In my mind I have already blown this out of proportion but what do you guys think? Definitely something not to do?

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After finishing one of my stations I had about a minute left. I was in a friendly mood and the interviewer was doing his own thing. I decided to ask him if he was from Iran because he had the accent. He simply said no and smiled. I am still kind of regretting this, but oh well I really don't think this was a big deal. In my mind I have already blown this out of proportion but what do you guys think? Definitely something not to do?

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1 minute ago, Distancea said:

After finishing one of my stations I had about a minute left. I was in a friendly mood and the interviewer was doing his own thing. I decided to ask him if he was from Iran because he had the accent. He simply said no and smiled. I am still kind of regretting this, but oh well I really don't think this was a big deal. In my mind I have already blown this out of proportion but what do you guys think? Definitely something not to do?

It's unlikely that that comment was something he could assess as part of the station. They can always note red flag items but this was by no means a red flag. 

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Don't be afraid of quiet. I know it can be tempting (especially under the time pressure of an interview) to try to fill every moment with words and to answer a question as soon as you can, but take a moment to breathe, to organize your thoughts, and to make sure you are able to express it as clearly and articulately as you can. There are pauses in natural conversation - don't rush! 

Also remember that you're allowed to change your mind!!! If a follow-up question brings a new perspective to your previous answer and you feel differently now, it can show maturity and an open mind if you acknowledge that this new perspective changes how you feel about your original answer rather than backing yourself into a corner and defending it to the death.

 

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3 hours ago, markup said:

Don't be afraid of quiet. I know it can be tempting (especially under the time pressure of an interview) to try to fill every moment with words and to answer a question as soon as you can, but take a moment to breathe, to organize your thoughts, and to make sure you are able to express it as clearly and articulately as you can. There are pauses in natural conversation - don't rush! 

Also remember that you're allowed to change your mind!!! If a follow-up question brings a new perspective to your previous answer and you feel differently now, it can show maturity and an open mind if you acknowledge that this new perspective changes how you feel about your original answer rather than backing yourself into a corner and defending it to the death.

 

Interesting! I've heard that it's OK to acknowledge a new perspective but ultimately you should not falter and you should defend your original decision/answer. I've always thought this line of thinking was a bit too rigid and doesn't allow for adaptability to new contextual information (which is so necessary in medical practice imo!). Although at the same time I can see why it may not look good to concede and revoke your initial answer so quickly lol

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On 4/3/2018 at 5:48 PM, PeterPatting said:

Interesting! I've heard that it's OK to acknowledge a new perspective but ultimately you should not falter and you should defend your original decision/answer. I've always thought this line of thinking was a bit too rigid and doesn't allow for adaptability to new contextual information (which is so necessary in medical practice imo!). Although at the same time I can see why it may not look good to concede and revoke your initial answer so quickly lol

I'd say go with what makes sense. Very rarely in life does 1 rule apply in all settings. Sometimes you see the other POV and if you feel it's justified you can change your mind. But if it doesn't change what you think then you can coherently present while you recognize that is a good point, for x y z reasons, you don't feel it changes your answer. I stuck to my guns against the interviewer at one of my interviews and sitting on an offer.. can't tell how I performed on that particular station but I'm guessing it wasn't a "flag"

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On 3/31/2018 at 3:12 PM, Eudaimonia said:

Do not fake an accent, as someone on here recommended against.

But really, do conduct yourself the way you would for a presentation, like you mentioned. These things are hard to control for during the interview as nerves will get to you, but I'm sure the interviewer is aware of that. As long as "ums" and distracting mannerisms don't get in the way of you expressing what you want to say, you should be fine. In the end, you will act only as good as your natural self is

 

Lmaoo unless it's a british accent. Those are cool :P

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Try to show your confidence, and don't be monotone!

Think of it from a psychology perspective - imagine you have been in a room for 4 hours watching students act out the same scenario with the same actors. If you keep seeing the same thing you are going to get bored. 

Stay animated

Show that you are interested - if you aren't, the evaluator won't be interested in you

Stay professional - answering someone's previous post - you might get tested on this (someone may act cold to you or challenge your opinion) - don't take anything personally, it's all part of the interview. In real life, patients challenge us on a daily basis - they can question our opinion or sometimes even get mad at us when we don't do the things the way they want to (as an example - a patient gets mad at you because you didn't call them with their x-ray results over the weekend, and waited until Monday (yes it has happened), how do you respond?). They want to test that you can stay professional even in uncomfortable situations.

Don't fart - that is a good one :) but worst case you'll be out of that station/room in max 8 minutes :P

Speaking about sticking to your original answer - it is important to show confidence, but if the other person has a good point, show that you are acknowledging their response, and take it into account before you keep defending your own opinion. Again, think of a patient encounter - Doctor thinks you have a cold, patients thinks they have a bacterial infection and want antibiotics, patient gets mad at doctor who is saying that they won't give the patient an antibiotic. Do you as the doctor keep telling the patient "no" until you get mad at each other? Or, do you try to find a work around (delayed antibiotics at the pharmacy if fever develops, quick follow up), to make both people happy, but really the doctor gets their way by not prescribing antibiotics. Try to use this logic when someone challenges your opinion - is there a way to see both sides but still get your way?

 

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