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smac

Question about Alberta Residency

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"A resident of Alberta is defined as a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident (Landed Immigrant) who has been continuously resident in the Province of Alberta, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories or Nunavut for at least one year immediately before the first day of classes of the term for which admission is sought." 

Does that mean that I would be considered an Alberta resident in for the October 2018 application if I moved there this August or I would be considered a resident in October 2019? Looking at moving out west once my Master's is done in August and was just wondering if anyone could clarify on what this sentence means. Also is first day of classes usually Sept 1st?

Thanks!

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As long as you move 1 year before classes start you will be considered a resident. You might have to provide some proof (lease, bank statements, employment etc..) so be prepared for that. 

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3 hours ago, Roronoaa said:

As long as you move 1 year before classes start you will be considered a resident. You might have to provide some proof (lease, bank statements, employment etc..) so be prepared for that. 

Thank you!!

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2 hours ago, clever_smart_boy_like_me said:

How many days a year are required for residence? In the Alberta care card application website it said 183 out of 365. Is this the same for UoA?

 

On 4/19/2018 at 9:54 PM, smac said:

"A resident of Alberta is defined as a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident (Landed Immigrant) who has been continuously resident in the Province of Alberta, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories or Nunavut for at least one year immediately before the first day of classes of the term for which admission is sought." 

Emphasis mine. In case there's still doubt, I'll refer to the second sentence from the U of A's website: "The one-year residence period shall not be considered broken where the admission committee is satisfied that the applicant was temporarily out of the province on vacation, in short-term employment, or as a full-time student"

 

So, 365 days - short-term vacations - short-term employment - time spent as a full-time student (provided you previously met criteria to be an Alberta resident)

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3 hours ago, clever_smart_boy_like_me said:

If I bought a place in Alberta in August and worked and lived there 4-5 days a week with weekend trips to another province or the States, etc. would that count do you think?

 

The only one who could tell you for sure is the admissions office, but that does seem to satisfy the criteria of living there 1 yr prior to matriculation with only short-term trips outside of Alberta

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My friend was thinking of moving to Alberta for a year to apply as an IP,  and called the admission office to confirm. 

They stated that 1 year of Alberta residency is a minimum requirement, but it will be ultimately at their discretion in deciding whether an applicant is IP or OOP. 

They were very vague about the process, and won't clarify further.. :mellow:

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6 hours ago, TILs said:

My friend was thinking of moving to Alberta for a year to apply as an IP,  and called the admission office to confirm. 

They stated that 1 year of Alberta residency is a minimum requirement, but it will be ultimately at their discretion in deciding whether an applicant is IP or OOP. 

They were very vague about the process, and won't clarify further.. :mellow:

So even if you technically qualify as IP they could still label you OOP?

-.-

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I can't say for sure, but they were not black or white about it. :( 

They probably don't want ppl to take advantage of the IP system, but I wish it could be clear cut. It could even be more strict (maybe 2 years of residency), rather than being ambiguous about it. It takes a lot of risk and effort move to another province. 

 

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