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Medicine in Australia

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Hello,

I am ontario resident who has been waitlisted twice at an ON med school (and rejected by BC post interview) after two applications. I am thinking about studying medicine at Australia because I don't think it's likely that I'll be able to secure a spot this year or the following year. I was hoping someone can fill me in on my options after I graduate with an MD from Australia. Thanks!

This is what I've gathered so far

1) Residency in US

with high USMLE scores,  great CV (research and what not), and perhaps clinical rotation in U.S, it's quite doable (even for non-US citizen IMGs). Is that right?

I personally know a few friends studying in Ireland and Carib, who were all able to match in the US. Would attending Aus school be at least as viable as those when in comes to US matching?

2) Internship/residency in Aus

there is an internship crisis in Australia but that depends on the school you study at (and thus the state you are in). If I work hard and choose my school right, I would still be able to find an internship position. there is also another program available (I think it's called Commonwealth Medical Internship) that significant helps Canadian's chances of matching (although these could be at rural areas)

3) Residency in Canada

generally not doable

4) Residency in other parts of the world (Singapore, UK...etc)

I didn't really look into this yet but I've heard that it's not difficult (at least not when compared with matching back to Canada).

 

 

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It is doable to match both to the US and Canada. It isn't really doable to match to the UK unless you are a citizen of the UK. Not sure about Singapore, but I doubt it will be easy, a citystate like Singapore could not accept many graduates before it got saturated. 

I think though, if you are scoring interviews, what you need to do is work on your interview skills. You don't save that much time by going to Australia, since there is a legitimate chance you end up needing to take a year off to match to residency. Additionally, you are limited in the specialties you can be interested in coming from Australia. It really isn't the best option unless you absolutely have no shot at Canada. 

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The US is the only hub that can accept decent number of residents, without residency training your degree is useless, going to non US connected schools is a deadend, and a stronger headache

USMD> USDO> international

period...If you cannot get USDO, internation should last resort

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My husband (from Ontario) graduated from an Australian medical school in New South Wales in 2017 and is finishing his second year of internship. (Didn't match back to Canada for FM this year - didn't try for US). Because he is a temporary resident in Australia, to apply into the general practitioner (FM) training program, he can only apply to rural Northern Territory with a letter of support and a statutory declaration stating he will have his permanent residence by the time he completes his GP training. That being said, I'm not sure the process for other training programs here if it's the same or not. This whole experience has been a whole big expensive mess and if I could go back in time, I would tell him not to study in Australia.

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18 hours ago, jm09hb said:

My husband (from Ontario) graduated from an Australian medical school in New South Wales in 2017 and is finishing his second year of internship. (Didn't match back to Canada for FM this year - didn't try for US). Because he is a temporary resident in Australia, to apply into the general practitioner (FM) training program, he can only apply to rural Northern Territory with a letter of support and a statutory declaration stating he will have his permanent residence by the time he completes his GP training. That being said, I'm not sure the process for other training programs here if it's the same or not. This whole experience has been a whole big expensive mess and if I could go back in time, I would tell him not to study in Australia.

Well his mistake was not writing the US exams and applying to the US. That's really his own fault. Can't change the past of course. Hope it works out

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46 minutes ago, JohnGrisham said:

Well his mistake was not writing the US exams and applying to the US. That's really his own fault. Can't change the past of course. Hope it works out

Yes, already well aware of that. Just simply giving the OP his experience/options after graduating from Australia. 

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Have a look here at the recently released CaRMS preliminary data for 2019. The numbers for current-year graduates (which, I believe, are mostly represented by Canadians studying abroad (CSAs)) are about 50% match rate back to Canada. For Australian graduates (which includes CSAs and Australian immigrants), the overall match rate is pretty high compared to other cohorts. So overall, coming back to Canada is pretty doable if you focus and do well in school, on exams, on elective rotations in Canada, etc.

Having said that, I completely agree with most of those who have posted here already: Look into doing medicine in the US. Going abroad to study leaves your likelihood of returning to Canada up to the flip of a coin. Even in the US where it is anecdotally easier to match, non-US IMGs typically see a 45-55% match rate every year. 

It gets even more complicated if you happen to love a really competitive specialty, and you may be put in the position where you will have to give that up and choose another in order to return home.

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6 hours ago, adrenergic24 said:

Have a look here at the recently released CaRMS preliminary data for 2019. The numbers for current-year graduates (which, I believe, are mostly represented by Canadians studying abroad (CSAs)) are about 50% match rate back to Canada. For Australian graduates (which includes CSAs and Australian immigrants), the overall match rate is pretty high compared to other cohorts. So overall, coming back to Canada is pretty doable if you focus and do well in school, on exams, on elective rotations in Canada, etc.

Having said that, I completely agree with most of those who have posted here already: Look into doing medicine in the US. Going abroad to study leaves your likelihood of returning to Canada up to the flip of a coin. Even in the US where it is anecdotally easier to match, non-US IMGs typically see a 45-55% match rate every year. 

It gets even more complicated if you happen to love a really competitive specialty, and you may be put in the position where you will have to give that up and choose another in order to return home.

Dont forget to factor in self-selection bias, many who won't have favourable odds end up not even applying to CaRMS and focus on the US or staying in Aussie.

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