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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/17/2018 in all areas

  1. Aconitase

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    I think we have gotten off topic. I understand totally that you are not wealthy despite having a higher than average family income. However I can also give you an example of a 20 yr old in my medical school who had two parents as doctors and multiple classmates who’s parents bought them bay street condos to use while in school. I am going to make a few points I think we can agree on: 1) On average, medical students come from wealthier backgrounds than the general population 2) If you do not come from money you may find it hard to socialize wit
    2 points
  2. My opinion is that a strong letter in medicine reflects well on you - however, if the letter may cause confusion about your career interests, it would be best to explicitly clarify in your personal statement that you were once considering internal medicine, but now have decided to focus on radiology.
    2 points
  3. You're in first year. Spend time reflecting on what you want your life and practice to eventually look like (ex. call or no call, # of years of training, location, medicine or surgery, patient population, inpatient or outpatient, etc.). Be honest with yourself about what draws you to both of those specialties. Arrange shadowing opportunities in those areas and ask questions about the work/life balance and job situation to current residents, fellows and staff. Look up job postings online for additional perspective. There is a large push by medical school administrators to have st
    1 point
  4. thesupreme

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    1 point
  5. 1 point
  6. MarsRover

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    I think it is definitely true that in general medical students come from a disproportionately wealthy background
    1 point
  7. Hi Arisarz, Have you tried applying to available job listings? If you look at the careers section for the Toronto hospital websites you should hopefully find a couple that pertain to your skills. Just be sure to tailor your resume and cover letter to each position and be prepared to apply liberally and wait a couple months, as it's pretty competitive. I had been doing that for my gap year as well and got a few bites at SickKids and the like (Edit: I don't have a MSc either but applied anyway). Best of luck!
    1 point
  8. Don't get your hopes up too much. Both your GPA and CARS are below the average you need. But if you can bring it up to a 3.6+ and get 130+ on CARS you have a much better shot. Consider also taking a 5th year perhaps and make sure you take full course loads so you meet the weighing forumlas for other schools. Honestly your GPA is salvageable just work hard. And I know what you mean. It can be disheartening comparing your stats to others and the whole process has become a rat race. But there is nothing you can do except do your absolute best and try to get in after a few cycles. If you thi
    1 point
  9. You could try reaching out to profs of classes you took, preferably ones that you did very well in. For hospitals, some of them preferentially select candidates from people already volunteering at their hospital. You could also look into whether your school as a work-study program and if there is an RA position available. If you're not hearing back from your applications, might want to visit your school's career counsellor and have them look over your resume. Try to tailor your resume for each job's description. Good luck and probably just takes some persistence.
    1 point
  10. Biggest tip would be to get to know what they're researching about, see them personally, and tell them why you're interested in what they're doing.
    1 point
  11. If I already have plenty of lab research, would it be prudent to try clinical research? I also am not the biggest on lab research- I enjoy it, but I couldn't see myself doing it forever. Clinical research seems like it would interest me more and would be more directly applciacble to life if that makes any sense. Getting published easier is also a bonus What do you guys think?
    1 point
  12. For admissions purposes? There is no preference, although admittedly I think it's generally a lot easier to get published in clinical studies. Additionally, if it's in a specialty you want to pursue in the future, it obviously yields many more benefits down the road in terms of pubs, networking, etc. There's so many more important factors though like which you enjoy more, if the PI can write you a good letter of reference, and which is less time intensive so you can focus on GPA (if you're doing research during the school year).
    1 point
  13. both is relevant they are both useful and relevant equally in medicine (depends on specialty, one may be more relevant/useful than the other) do what you are interested in
    1 point
  14. Snowmen

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    You're speaking like they're holding them twice a week, every week.
    1 point
  15. I mean I do think a lot of students are well off but hyperbole much? I do think there is an issue with people looking down on others in medicine but that happens even in the context of people looking down on other specialties... it's infuriating to see people so disrespected. - G
    1 point
  16. I would never have imagined call of duty being used in a premed/med forum... - G
    1 point
  17. A-Stark

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    I'm not sure why social events involving drinking are considered markers of wealth. I would say at my med school not drinking was very much an exception. Generally speaking, EtOH is the centre of socialization in the Maritimes and NL.
    1 point
  18. Sounds pretty good. Try to get a lot more volunteering hours than what you have right now - I heard average for US students these days hover around 200hrs, and you'd probably want to exceed Americans in pretty much every criterion to get in. Tough process
    1 point
  19. frenchpress

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    It seems like a massive generalization to say that most medical students are from wealthy families or had nannies growing up or do nothing but drink! Did you go to med school on a private yacht? (I am conjuring images of a fancy breaker high meets greys anatomy type scenario). I am not sure where else you would find only these kinds of people for your classmates OP: In my experience, it’s completely the opposite. Most med students are pretty normal people, although there’s a greater concentration of the more motivated and academically successful. And what’s ‘normal’ in terms of how
    1 point
  20. PhD2MD

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    I've been wondering that as well lately...I think I do come off as trying to dissuade. It's not really a sourness about medicine, it's more above the process and the "med-or-die" culture that exists. I think the obsession with medicine is unwarranted and most premeds know very little about the think they're obsessed with (heck, many med students don't). Medicine is nice, but it's not what most people think it is, and I'm trying to be the counterweight to that prevailing view. If you know what medicine is, and you've fairly compared it to other things...than sure med-or-die. Buy most haven
    1 point
  21. How do you determine the "difficulty"? I've intubated people, put in central lines, treated STEMIs, reduced fractues and have listened to people cry how Brenda at work is giving them a hard time week after week. I find the last issue the most difficult one any day of the week. I still infrequently have to do the former but would do that over the last 10 times out of 10. And it's not reflected in the pay, whatsoever
    1 point
  22. I graduated, and took 5 full credits (10 half credits) in an extra year of undergraduate. The credits from my first semester were counted towards my subGPA and cumGPA. So I know courses outside of your degree count towards your application, at least for Ontario schools. Hope this helps!
    1 point
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