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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/13/2021 in Posts

  1. This question makes me so sad. Really speaks to the classism that exists in the medical field, and more broadly in higher-education. Include it proudly, OP.
    3 points
  2. I shopped around for awhile and ended up with Scotiabank. David Smith is a great guy to work with and made the whole process dead simple, I barely had to do anything. Way better experience than I've ever had with BMO, for whatever that's worth!
    1 point
  3. Dishwashing is a tough job. Definitely include it and be proud of it I used to dishwash, deliver newspapers, and clean toilets. I’m glad I did it. Taught me discipline, respect, and resilience at a young age.
    1 point
  4. I've also been looking around and after talking with Scotiabank and RBC, I found that both LOC's were very similar. However, RBC offers a LOC up to 250k and in special circumstances up to 350k ("depending on circumstances and if you specialize") whereas Scotiabank offers up to 350k regardless. This is just based on my conversations and I'm likely going to go with Scotiabank. I'd be interested to know if anyone has any additional information!
    1 point
  5. For sure! Based on the feedback we received, people found the panel very informative and helpful. We’ll try to hold another one in the coming months.
    1 point
  6. They both automatically debit interest payments from your LoC and add it to the loan amount, they don't require monthly payments on the loan itself. "Grace period" is a bit of a misnomer if I understand it correctly, because you're still paying interest. Scotiabank converts the LoC to a personal line of credit that you can keep open indefinitely, so the "grace period" of paying interest only is basically indefinite. You only start making payments on the LoC after it converts to a loan. I think RBC forces you to convert the LoC to a loan 2 years post-residency/fellowship. Granted, I'm not sure
    1 point
  7. I would really like to become a clinician scientist, and my lab has some promising research to conduct in the near future that I would love to be a part of. I have worked in my current lab for 3 years as an UG student and MSc. student and do not want to lose the research aspect of my learning! I understand that the program at U of S is not as prominent as other schools, but this is where I want to pursue medicine and research, so I am willing to put in the time!
    1 point
  8. To OP and others in a similar situation who may stumble upon this, It is so so so frustrating and disheartening to have to work harder and harder, year after year, only to be met with unfortunate news at the end of each attempt. I was also in the same boat before I was offered a seat. One can spend hours speculating the topic of admissions, but it would be wiser to focus on what options are available to you and plan what actions/paths to take, whether that'd be doing more schooling, applying abroad, etc. Regarding more schooling, it is definitely possible to pull up your GPA. Alth
    1 point
  9. I got my comment deleted so i guess somebody didn't like what i called out, but this thread has some pretty toxic undertones. All i see are people on here complaining about their unfortunate circumstances (some of which are consequences of their own actions). The most concerning is people putting down others with saying that younger people with good stats aren't well suited to be doctors. Not cool.
    1 point
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