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Bambi

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  1. Thanks
    Bambi got a reaction from Holdman in M.D. after D.M.D.   
    Life is too short, we should not live with any regrets wherever possible and if I were you, I would follow my passion and dreams. At age 37, you will have not less than 40 remaining productive professional years (I know one physician who continued his practice into his early 90s). 
    Interestingly, many decades ago, there was a dentist, upon opening his practice, who had considerable free time on his hands, and so, he went to medical school, obtained his medical degree, and he became a dentist's dentist. When a dentist ran into a problem with a patient on the chair, the patient was immediately sent to him and he developed a brisk practice in handling very difficult cases that others could not handle. He was never interested in the practice of medicine as dentistry was his passion. 
  2. Thanks
    Bambi got a reaction from LostLamb in Should a med student incorporate or wait until residency?   
    I agree with the approach and reasoning of LostLamb entirely. 
  3. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from Shae94 in UBC Interview   
    You received excellent advice! Just be your authentic self, letting your personality shine. Should you be asked "Tell me about yourself", be prepared to describe your interests, why you are passionate about this profession, what led you to dentistry, the challenges you have overcome, your development that prepares you for the study of dentistry, and any hobbies and experiences that highlight whom you are. Just relax and be yourself!
  4. Like
    Bambi reacted to Dmdd2021 in UBC Interview   
    You can't really prepare for it because their questions are really random and nothing like US dental school interviews. They just want to know your personality and insist on not faking it because they care about the class dynamics. So, if your personality is not the type they are looking for, then probably it is for your own interest not to attend that school for 4 long years. Just relax and be yourself
  5. Like
    Bambi reacted to dkeegan in Sabbatical year at the end of preclinical years, before clerkship years (between M2-M3)   
    Dear MedFam20,
    I'm a faculty member who regularly reviews applications for a Canadian residency program.  Here are my thoughts.
    First, do what you need to do.  If you need to take a break, take a break.
    Second, as has been mentioned, be prepared to explain it.  And it sounds like you've got a good explanation.  Be authentic in your explanation; don't try to make up something fancy.
    Will some file reviewers dislike that you took a break?  Maybe, but then you wouldn't want to be at such a program.
    Will some file reviewers respect that you took a sabbatical that is built-in as an available option?  For sure!  I would.
    I would suggest that you can describe what you've done with that year - not just playing Call of Duty, but describe how you used your time as you describe wanting to.
    To me, this kind of desire is an incredible sign of maturity.  I would love to have in our program such a person who was very mindful about their role in medicine and sought out a pause to be sure, rather than mindlessly staying on a path.  The other thing is such a gap in training is an incredible opportunity and a rare one. 
    So if your heart is telling you to do this, do it.  This is a good rule for life and a great rule for careers.  Not everyone will get it.  But who cares about them.
    Plus, you'll be able to explain that it was an opportunity provided by your university.  (To be clear, file reviewers will want to understand that it wasn't 'cause you failed a year.)  You will need to be explicit about this gap in time in your personal letter.
    Me?  I hope that I get to review your application in a few years time.  I'm looking forward to hearing about what you did on your year, how it helped you become a better doctor, how it helped you learn more about yourself.
    I wish you the very best.
    David Keegan
    PS - MedFam20, feel free to reach out to me through ofdp@ucalgary.ca.
  6. Like
    Bambi reacted to FutureYodaMD in Is biology a good major for Medicine?   
    Choose a major that genuinely interests you. Of course, each medical school admissions have specific prerequisites requirements, so make sure you take those accordingly. However, you'll get the best GPA when you're studying something you're passionate/motivated about. Trust me, I learned the hard way! I wouldn't say there's "easier" majors because it depends on your motivation for learning, and that motivation stems from genuinely caring about the topics, whether that's biology, history, chemistry, music, literature, psychology, engineering, etc.
     
    Good luck!
  7. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from Denti_Pharm in Is biology a good major for Medicine?   
    The only issue for you is what Program will maximize your opportunity to attain the highest GPA. Biology per se is not, in my opinion, a great prep, however, pre-meds study almost anything. I took the Specialization Program at Exercise Science in Concordia which I thought prepared me well for med, especially with the internships involving the elderly chronically ill and I attained straight A's. Taking a Program that interests you usually motivates one to work hard and attain high grades.
  8. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from Hamz09 in Med-P Applicants R Score and Invites /Regrets 2019   
    That is the way to go, together with time & stress management skills, AND allowing no distractions such as a needy s.o. who can derail your ambitions.
    Moreover, be prepared to go to university for an undergrad degree as not all will be accepted directly from Cegep. This is a very lengthy marathon that requires high motivation, continuous hard work and relentless perseverance.
    I did not have either the grades or maturity in Cegep, I got in after undergrad and now am in practice. 
  9. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from imz in Talking about your CV during (Med-P) MMI?   
    Let's put aside your actual motivation as to why you undertook an activity. It is not really relevant to anything, rather what is important is how you grew from the activity, what competencies you developed. Tutoring is far from menial! To tutor effectively, you need to establish in your own mind, the level of the student, if there are any learning disabilities and/or difficulties encountered in understanding concepts, how motivated the student is, how to motivate and encourage the student. Communication skills, problem solving, critical thinking, teaching, compassion and more are involved. These competencies are required of physicians even though tutoring per se has nothing to do with medicine.
    I would think any activity that helped develop such competencies is a candidate for inclusion in your CV. Being a cashier, a server can help you develop meaningful competencies. How you write your CV is important to convey not just what you did, but how you developed.   
    As a Cegepien, my grades were too low for me to apply at that time. I also did not have the requisite maturity. I remember another brilliant student in Cegep who had a stellar CV and he was not accepted. Both of us went to university and matured. Both of us got into med school on our first try from undergrad. This is a looong marathon. You don't have a clue when and where lightning will strike and there may be detours along the way. I failed an exam in med school and had to rewrite. This was a temporary hit to my self-confidence. 
    You need to make important strategic decisions along the journey. For example, if you choose a needy s.o. who is a drain on your time and emotions, your ambitions can be derailed! You want someone who is supportive of your ambitions to comfort and stand by you in times of defeat, who understands your time is limited as your focus must be on studies. At undergrad, you need to choose the appropriate university and program for you, prestige is utterly meaningless and irrelevant. At your age, I was a shy kid, today I am a leader with a surgical practice. I could have done a fellowship to develop expertise in a subspecialty but decided against this as I did not want to do assembly line surgery, the same thing over and over and over, for my entire career. I do a variety of surgeries in my specialty practice which keeps my interest.  
    It all starts with the first step - which is before the application. In my case, I was highly motivated and understood that I had to be a straight A student in university, which required selecting the right program, the right electives, studying smart for me and self-sacrifice whereby I was totally exhausted at the end of each semester. I worked hard in undergrad, harder in med school, much much harder in residency. In a sense, it never ends. I survived on student loans only since Cegep, I walked to university to save on transportation, I brought my lunches and a thermos to save expenses. Each of these decisions were important at the time. I lost every friend I had while attending undergrad as when they partied, I was constantly studying, not being the brightest light bulb in the class. Was it worth it looking back? Absolutely. 
  10. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from soupefroide in Talking about your CV during (Med-P) MMI?   
    Unlikely, but you should be aware of how your activities impacted the development of your CanMEDS competencies such as leadership, communication skills, collaboration, empathy, etc.
    I recall several years ago an interviewer grilled an interviewee about a topic that was not in the script - to a point where it appeared this was a case of discrimination! He was not accepted (although accepted at another QC med school) and wrote to the Dean complaining, The Dean replied that he had received the top mark possible at this Station! So, bottom line, absolutely anything is possible, be prepared for the unexpected, be flexible, nothing canned. 
  11. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from drdean in Applying to 2 specialties   
    Exploration is essential and normal. I cannot see this as a red flag. I applied toand had interviews with 2 competitive specialties and FM, today am a surgeon.  My take is that you should go for it!
  12. Like
    Bambi reacted to zxcccxz in Parallel planning   
    It's certainly possible and most people do it. Med schools highly encourage it to keep the unmatched rate low.
    But ultimately, how feasible it is depends on what your interests are. If you are applying to IM and FM, its quite easy to have competitive applications for both. If your two interests are opthalmology and dermatology, you basically risk not matching to either by trying to make a half-assed effort for both. Ideally, you want to pick two specialties that have a lot of overlap, so for example, when you do research, whatever productivity you have can be applied to both (e.g., research on acute airway management can be applied to both anaesthesiology and emergency medicine). It would also allow you to say in your personal letters/interviews for speciality 1 that specialty 2 is your backup and in your personal letters/interviews for speciality 2 that speciality 1 was your backup; rather than clearly backing up with a speciality and then having a tough time selling yourself if you don't match to your first choice.
  13. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from dooogs in Parallel planning   
    I was lucky, but not unusually so. People keep their options open and so the story goes, you were considering both but in the end, opted for this field because ........
    Regarding your last sentence, I wouldn't worry. 
  14. Thanks
    Bambi got a reaction from NervousStudent in Talking about your CV during (Med-P) MMI?   
    Let's put aside your actual motivation as to why you undertook an activity. It is not really relevant to anything, rather what is important is how you grew from the activity, what competencies you developed. Tutoring is far from menial! To tutor effectively, you need to establish in your own mind, the level of the student, if there are any learning disabilities and/or difficulties encountered in understanding concepts, how motivated the student is, how to motivate and encourage the student. Communication skills, problem solving, critical thinking, teaching, compassion and more are involved. These competencies are required of physicians even though tutoring per se has nothing to do with medicine.
    I would think any activity that helped develop such competencies is a candidate for inclusion in your CV. Being a cashier, a server can help you develop meaningful competencies. How you write your CV is important to convey not just what you did, but how you developed.   
    As a Cegepien, my grades were too low for me to apply at that time. I also did not have the requisite maturity. I remember another brilliant student in Cegep who had a stellar CV and he was not accepted. Both of us went to university and matured. Both of us got into med school on our first try from undergrad. This is a looong marathon. You don't have a clue when and where lightning will strike and there may be detours along the way. I failed an exam in med school and had to rewrite. This was a temporary hit to my self-confidence. 
    You need to make important strategic decisions along the journey. For example, if you choose a needy s.o. who is a drain on your time and emotions, your ambitions can be derailed! You want someone who is supportive of your ambitions to comfort and stand by you in times of defeat, who understands your time is limited as your focus must be on studies. At undergrad, you need to choose the appropriate university and program for you, prestige is utterly meaningless and irrelevant. At your age, I was a shy kid, today I am a leader with a surgical practice. I could have done a fellowship to develop expertise in a subspecialty but decided against this as I did not want to do assembly line surgery, the same thing over and over and over, for my entire career. I do a variety of surgeries in my specialty practice which keeps my interest.  
    It all starts with the first step - which is before the application. In my case, I was highly motivated and understood that I had to be a straight A student in university, which required selecting the right program, the right electives, studying smart for me and self-sacrifice whereby I was totally exhausted at the end of each semester. I worked hard in undergrad, harder in med school, much much harder in residency. In a sense, it never ends. I survived on student loans only since Cegep, I walked to university to save on transportation, I brought my lunches and a thermos to save expenses. Each of these decisions were important at the time. I lost every friend I had while attending undergrad as when they partied, I was constantly studying, not being the brightest light bulb in the class. Was it worth it looking back? Absolutely. 
  15. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from Bottas in For profit premed consulting website trashing premed101   
    We have proven ourselves for many many years in providing excellent advice to our membership and so many of us got into medical school from what we learned right here!
    There are greedy vultures everywhere.
  16. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from MDee2B in Talking about your CV during (Med-P) MMI?   
    Let's put aside your actual motivation as to why you undertook an activity. It is not really relevant to anything, rather what is important is how you grew from the activity, what competencies you developed. Tutoring is far from menial! To tutor effectively, you need to establish in your own mind, the level of the student, if there are any learning disabilities and/or difficulties encountered in understanding concepts, how motivated the student is, how to motivate and encourage the student. Communication skills, problem solving, critical thinking, teaching, compassion and more are involved. These competencies are required of physicians even though tutoring per se has nothing to do with medicine.
    I would think any activity that helped develop such competencies is a candidate for inclusion in your CV. Being a cashier, a server can help you develop meaningful competencies. How you write your CV is important to convey not just what you did, but how you developed.   
    As a Cegepien, my grades were too low for me to apply at that time. I also did not have the requisite maturity. I remember another brilliant student in Cegep who had a stellar CV and he was not accepted. Both of us went to university and matured. Both of us got into med school on our first try from undergrad. This is a looong marathon. You don't have a clue when and where lightning will strike and there may be detours along the way. I failed an exam in med school and had to rewrite. This was a temporary hit to my self-confidence. 
    You need to make important strategic decisions along the journey. For example, if you choose a needy s.o. who is a drain on your time and emotions, your ambitions can be derailed! You want someone who is supportive of your ambitions to comfort and stand by you in times of defeat, who understands your time is limited as your focus must be on studies. At undergrad, you need to choose the appropriate university and program for you, prestige is utterly meaningless and irrelevant. At your age, I was a shy kid, today I am a leader with a surgical practice. I could have done a fellowship to develop expertise in a subspecialty but decided against this as I did not want to do assembly line surgery, the same thing over and over and over, for my entire career. I do a variety of surgeries in my specialty practice which keeps my interest.  
    It all starts with the first step - which is before the application. In my case, I was highly motivated and understood that I had to be a straight A student in university, which required selecting the right program, the right electives, studying smart for me and self-sacrifice whereby I was totally exhausted at the end of each semester. I worked hard in undergrad, harder in med school, much much harder in residency. In a sense, it never ends. I survived on student loans only since Cegep, I walked to university to save on transportation, I brought my lunches and a thermos to save expenses. Each of these decisions were important at the time. I lost every friend I had while attending undergrad as when they partied, I was constantly studying, not being the brightest light bulb in the class. Was it worth it looking back? Absolutely. 
  17. Thanks
    Bambi got a reaction from NervousStudent in Talking about your CV during (Med-P) MMI?   
    Unlikely, but you should be aware of how your activities impacted the development of your CanMEDS competencies such as leadership, communication skills, collaboration, empathy, etc.
    I recall several years ago an interviewer grilled an interviewee about a topic that was not in the script - to a point where it appeared this was a case of discrimination! He was not accepted (although accepted at another QC med school) and wrote to the Dean complaining, The Dean replied that he had received the top mark possible at this Station! So, bottom line, absolutely anything is possible, be prepared for the unexpected, be flexible, nothing canned. 
  18. Like
    Bambi reacted to coco chanel in R score   
    just wait for your real r score; with the ministerial exams that got cancelled, it’s really unpredictable. focus on your grades because they’re not determined by how the others perform.
  19. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from ToMDorNotToMD in UofT Personal Statement   
    https://www.mcgill.ca/dentistry/programs/essential-skills-and-abilities
    https://dental.washington.edu/policies/clinic-policy-manual/clinical-competencies/
    https://www.google.com/search?lei=YbdqYdvREsuZ_QaI2JOYCA&q=problem solving skills in dentistry&ved=2ahUKEwibhqLl6c7zAhXLTN8KHQjsBIMQsKwBKAR6BAg4EAU&biw=825&bih=392&dpr=3.32
    https://www.adea.org/adeacci/Resources/Critical-Thinking-Skills-Toolkit/Pages/Overview-of-Critical-Thinking-Skills.aspx
    https://www.bu.edu/dental/ce/clinical-treatment-planning-and-problem-solving-when-it-doesnt-go-by-the-book/
    file:///C:/Users/micha/Downloads/canmeds-full-framework-e.pdf
  20. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from MDee2B in Considering withdrawing my application due to low MCAT   
    Let it play out! 
  21. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from MJDCAL25 in Considering withdrawing my application due to low MCAT   
    Let it play out! 
  22. Like
    Bambi reacted to rmorelan in For profit premed consulting website trashing premed101   
    You aren't wrong but those companies in many ways are worse - it is in their best interest for people to think they have a shot but only a shot if they have their help which of course they are willing to provide for a "reasonable" fee. Realism is not exactly the top priority. 
    My work on the forum, along with many others,  has been in many ways a direct counter response to those companies. We do what they do, often much better, and for no fee. I do take a certain amount of pleasure knowing we annoy them. 
     
     
  23. Like
    Bambi reacted to jb24 in For profit premed consulting website trashing premed101   
    Unfortunately I notice some medical students try and do this to pre-meds and offer "consulting" for fees. Look, I know medical school is expensive, but please just don't do this. Never sat right with me.
  24. Like
    Bambi got a reaction from jb24 in For profit premed consulting website trashing premed101   
    We have proven ourselves for many many years in providing excellent advice to our membership and so many of us got into medical school from what we learned right here!
    There are greedy vultures everywhere.
  25. Like
    Bambi reacted to garceyues in Considering withdrawing my application due to low MCAT   
    You have already submitted so just wait and see what happens, there is literally no good reason to withdraw your application at this point unless you are having second thoughts on med in general. I know people that got into calgary last year with a 124 CARS score
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