Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Lactic Folly

Members
  • Content Count

    3,592
  • Joined

  • Days Won

    17

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from SunAndMoon in Diagnosed with testicular cancer 1 month before interviews...   
    Sorry to hear. I don't have any advice to add, but wanted to wish you a full and speedy recovery.
  2. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from indefatigable in Just got an interview off waitlist...   
    You know yourself best... can you perform well with little sleep on adrenaline when stakes are high? Can you sleep well on a plane? Can you change the Calgary interview date/time (see if they've had anyone decline)? How do you feel your chances are at Queens? I'm assuming a private jet is out of the question 
  3. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to FailureToThrive in Thanks   
    Just wanted to say thank you to the creators of the forum and all the wonderful people on it. 
    You've made medicine accessible for people like myself who don't have any connections and don't know anyone in medicine close enough to ask them the hard questions.
    Keep up the good work!
  4. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from frenchpress in ...   
    Same for being in the work world, inside or outside of medicine.
  5. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to InstantRamen in Winging the interview - no prep   
    I prepped a lot for my interview because I wanted fluidity. IMHO, Yyou sound a lot more articulate if you have structured sentences with good diction. I would have talked a lot slower and sounded a lot less smart. It really depends on you and how you want to come across.
  6. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from hoping_for_derm in Interview attire   
    I think blazer + dress combo looks great. Knee length would be a more conservative option.
    As for your other question, it depends on what you are trying to achieve in the interview. A typical panel interview has the applicant sitting across a table from the interviewers for 20 min... so it's probably more advantageous to try to stand out in terms of answers/personality than dress.
     
  7. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Interview attire   
    I think blazer + dress combo looks great. Knee length would be a more conservative option.
    As for your other question, it depends on what you are trying to achieve in the interview. A typical panel interview has the applicant sitting across a table from the interviewers for 20 min... so it's probably more advantageous to try to stand out in terms of answers/personality than dress.
     
  8. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from frenchpress in Interview attire   
    I think blazer + dress combo looks great. Knee length would be a more conservative option.
    As for your other question, it depends on what you are trying to achieve in the interview. A typical panel interview has the applicant sitting across a table from the interviewers for 20 min... so it's probably more advantageous to try to stand out in terms of answers/personality than dress.
     
  9. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from MEDusa in Show me the positive! What do you love about being a med student or a resident?   
    This is an excerpt from a post I wrote in 2009 (!):
    Yes, a medical career is not unique in helping people (in fact I'd say all jobs help people). But I think it is unique in the sheer impact you can have on that central part of people's existences - their health. In what other field do people entrust you with the most intimate details of their lives, allow you to delve physically into their bodies, make decisions regarding interventions that will affect them for better or worse? Every time I write a prescription, I still feel a slight awe that people will go out and take these drugs (with their attendant side effects) merely because I said it would help them. 
    http://forums.premed101.com/topic/30557-pro-forma/
     
  10. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to ZBL in .   
    As someone who has gone through grad school, and now medicine, some of the comments here are pretty naive. 
    Undergrads are functionally useless to a lab when they start. They eat up resources and time. If they are doing an independent project, they are usually small and not terribly significant. If it is a bigger one part of a research program, then usually it’s something attached to a grad student’s work and that grad student needs to take time away to deal with it. As someone else above mentioned, it is not until you accumulate a reasonable amount of skill and knowledge that you become useful to the research team. So by that token, if you showed up and said “I want to do project X”, then the professor damn well expects you to finish project X. If you leave half way, they have to waste even more time trying to train someone else just to get back to the point where you left the lab, which is incredibly wasteful to the lab in terms of resources, money and time. 
    People seem to think participating in research is some sort of right-of-way to get into med school. It isn’t. You don’t need to do it to get in. People also seem to think it’s a professors primary job to train undergrads. It’s not. It’s to do research and train grad students. They owe you nothing. 
    My advice to to anyone here, before walking into a lab like some hot shot thinking they’re going to get into med school, take a minute and think about whether research is something you actually want to do. If so, and you agree to do a project, then finish it. It’s no different than anything else, be it matching in CaRMS, taking on some leadership position or agreeing to pick someone up from the airport - follow through on the commitments you are making. No one is saying you need to be a researcher for life - but be clear with people up front about what your goals and expectations are. In a research lab, that could be “hey Dr. _____, I’m in my second year of undergrad, and I’m really fascinated by the work that you are doing. My long term goal is to apply to medical school, but I would be very keen to learn more about _____. I was wondering if there might be any possibility to volunteer to provide assistance to any projects that you or your graduate students are working on.” 
    There, you’ve been up front, and rather than taking on something new on your own you just lend a helping hand. Free to leave whenever you want. Very different from agreeing to do some big project on your own and then bailing halfway. 
    So so from my view, if I was the prof (and having done med school and grad school), I’d probably be similar. I doubt he really cares what your final career is whether it’s medicine, research or whatever else, but If I’m giving up time to train you, I’d expect you to give back time to the team as per your commitment. Otherwise I’d see it as a professionalism issue. 
    And actually, UofC highlights exactly that in their MD applications. Grad students are not allowed to apply and leave grad school midway without the explicit written approval by their supervisor to leave, because of the professionalism issue. 
    So in your case, I’d say do what you like - be it apply now or wait a year. If you apply now, I would not ask your prof for a letter.
    Lastly, despite what others here have suggested, no, the prof probably never wanted to do med school and did grad school as their primary interest. Med students/premeds seem to think everyone wants to be like us. I mean, 200K in debt, an extra 9-10 years of training with no income, slave work hours, no autonomy - yeah EVERYONE wants that....
  11. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Show me the positive! What do you love about being a med student or a resident?   
    This is an excerpt from a post I wrote in 2009 (!):
    Yes, a medical career is not unique in helping people (in fact I'd say all jobs help people). But I think it is unique in the sheer impact you can have on that central part of people's existences - their health. In what other field do people entrust you with the most intimate details of their lives, allow you to delve physically into their bodies, make decisions regarding interventions that will affect them for better or worse? Every time I write a prescription, I still feel a slight awe that people will go out and take these drugs (with their attendant side effects) merely because I said it would help them. 
    http://forums.premed101.com/topic/30557-pro-forma/
     
  12. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to JohnGrisham in What are typical hours working in Family Medicine?   
    it depends on your setup and clinic you work at. 

    Just remember, that patients often also work during the day and while our own families are important etc, try to throw a bone sometimes and do an evening or weekend shift.  Many of the clinics i've seen usually have saturday shifts and sometimes sunday too. But if you don't want to, you can easily find places that fit your needs. Also depends on how test results etc are handled at the clinic, and if you personally review them or its shared burden etc.

    Most provincial colleges also have the expectation that as a Family doctor, you are "available" to your patients after hours. This means, that if you don't have clinic hours after 5pm, that you have a call service amongst your practice so that your patients can reach a physician. Or that you pay a call service, so your patients have someone to reach. While most doctors, especially those that are graduating more recently in the last 10 years, don't really follow this (most just say on their answering machine to go to the ER if its an emergency, which for all intensive purposes is not meeting this expectaiton), there should be some sort of system set up to be professional.  Even though it is a professional expectation, the college doesn't really clamp down on this at all.  It costs a heck of a lot more for that patient to go waste everyones time in the ER. 

    (http://www.cpsa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Tips_for_Meeting_Continuity_of_Care_Standard.pdf)
  13. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from feversugar in Changes in Personal Relationships During Residency and Their Effects on Resident Wellness   
    This may be unique to those who do an off-service PGY-1 year, but it was overall the most free time I've had since entering clerkship. If not on call, I went home when the OR or ward work was done - everything was handed over. Now with greater responsibility, work comes home with me all the time.
    I suspect there is probably as much variation in practice options *within* a lot of specialties, as there is between specialties. Positions which allow more of a work-life balance are the type you often see occupied by those closer to retirement. Of course, there will be tradeoffs in terms of income, job security, and career building, which is why fewer new grads will seek them.
  14. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from SunAndMoon in How happy are you with choosing medical achool and becoming a doctor? Êtes vous satisfaits d'avoir choisit la médecine comme carrière?   
    I see, thanks for elaborating on your perspective comparing to another career path. Agree that the difference is often more in niche/quality than necessarily degree of impact - although the extra credential could be useful if going for public health/global heatlh/technology/politics to have a broader impact, which is what I had wondered about when reading your post initially. 
    Having seen patient expectations in my personal life, I have always perceived this as a challenge in more treatment-focused fields, particularly FM as patients return to them after specialists have ruled out conditions in their subfields. As a diagnostic physician, if a test is normal, it's normal, and most patients seem to accept that 
  15. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from IMislove in How happy are you with choosing medical achool and becoming a doctor? Êtes vous satisfaits d'avoir choisit la médecine comme carrière?   
    Care to elaborate? Despite the rich source for medical humanities writing that patient care provides, I could see personal growth being limited by the same factors leading to burnout. So, I'm more curious about your disappointment on the meaningfulness front. Is it in the sense of the scale of the impact that you can have?
  16. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from la marzocco in How happy are you with choosing medical achool and becoming a doctor? Êtes vous satisfaits d'avoir choisit la médecine comme carrière?   
    All careers have their challenges... everything has a tradeoff.
  17. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Winging the interview - no prep   
    But isn't this preparation, and arguably the most important part? If these experiences weren't at the forefront of one's mind, could they have as easily been called upon the limited time frame of the interview? It seems this thread is discussing a specific type of preparation to give structured answers.
  18. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from clever_smart_boy_like_me in Winging the interview - no prep   
    But isn't this preparation, and arguably the most important part? If these experiences weren't at the forefront of one's mind, could they have as easily been called upon the limited time frame of the interview? It seems this thread is discussing a specific type of preparation to give structured answers.
  19. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from MDLaval in Back up specialty interview answers   
    No, you likely won't be asked point blank, but it's possible that they may broach the subject indirectly through asking about your career decision making process and your level of interest in their field... with the elephant in the room being your obvious interest in another field on your CV... so the OP is wise to think about how to address the program's concerns.
  20. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from indefatigable in Am I reading this wrong?   
    That's what I would be speculating as well... the level of specificity in the ad could be "tailor-made".
  21. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to Hanmari in .   
    That's my year - I hope that was the result of a goodwill gesture of a worthy colleague. It might've just been the worthy colleague him/herself though. On second thought are you sure it wasn't just one of us going home postcall?
  22. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to goleafsgochris in .   
    Real talk--I would waaaaaay rather be in your position than have a shit GPA and lots of university friends.  If you can make friends/socialize on top of getting a great GPA that's a bonus.  If not, fuck that, get a good GPA and do ECs in the summer.  I also had a fairly "non-social" undergrad (I basically socialized in the summers and occasionally during the school semesters).  I regret it zero.  The people who have a great time in uni at the expense of their grades have sacrificed 35 years of their career for 3-4 years of partying with people most of them will lose contact with anyway.
    I made tons of friends in med school and residency, and now in my career, and so will you.  Be proud of your badass gpa and don't feel bad.
  23. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to goleafsgochris in Research in a different specialty   
    I agree with this.
    From people I have known, "waiting until clerkship to decide what I like" got people 100% of the time to go into family medicine.  Sometimes because its what they wanted, and sometimes because they had no choice.  You will not have time to plan enough electives to get into a competitive specialty if you wait until clerkship, unless you are an extreme outlier.
    My recommendation would be--ask yourself why you are doing the research you are now "good at."  What is the point?  What is its end?  Doing unrelated research may at best marginally help you, but I can almost guarantee you are better off spending your time deciding what you want to do, and then actually going for it.
     
    Edit: I just realized you want to spend TWO SUMMERS doing the research?  Why?!?  Organize some community electives in things you think might interest you.  Even do a week in like 5 different specialties.  Do anything except waste your time on unrelated research, please take a step back and evaluate this choice, from what I am reading you have severe blinders on that are going to waste precious and critically important time in early med school
  24. Like
    Lactic Folly reacted to lil_doc in How did you settle on which specialty to do electives in   
    Agree with all the advice from above.
    This book is also useful. It's American so some stuff is out of context, but the gist of each specialty and what the day to day life involves is here.
    https://www.tesd.net/cms/lib/PA01001259/Centricity/Domain/344/Careers in Medicine.pdf
    I think the thing people forget too is that your experience as a resident or med student is far from staff life. For the most part, internists and pediatricians rarely do CTU and spend most of their time in outpatient clinics and in the community, which we get very little exposure to at most programs. Surgeons only operate 1-2 days a week and spend the rest of the time doing clinic or administrative duty. Understanding the full scope of practice and what the daily life is about is a big component of decision making!
  25. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from la marzocco in Paving road back to home province   
    It's probably no harder than matching into that competitive specialty in general. Be a strong candidate those programs would want to recruit no matter where you're from.
×
×
  • Create New...