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Lactic Folly

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  1. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from B3.572A in Value Of Volunteering   
    Yes, helpful. This would be generally after the second year though, in 4-year MD programs. It's a different type of benefit compared to research. Elective opportunites in the preclerkship phase will vary according to the school.
  2. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Bambi in Value Of Volunteering   
    Depends on what you mean by getting involved. Many students sign up for the volunteering/community events/committees that their class participates in, so these activities may not stand out, unless you had a significant leadership role or impact. Do the community work you're interested in for the good of your soul, not for CaRMS.
  3. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Nietzsche_hammer in Esr Brochure On Radiology As A Career   
    http://www.myesr.org/html/img/pool/ESR_2014_Becoming_a_Radiologist_Broschuere_web.pdf
     
    I thought this was well-written. Relatively concise but pithy, hits the high points as well as does a good job of addressing common misconceptions about the field.
  4. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from indefatigable in Radiology Question.   
    Are you going for an English or French speaking residency? Either way, I would never count yourself out, as the GPA is only a fraction of the overall equation, and what matters is the program's perception of your future potential as a strong resident.
  5. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from B3.572A in Radiology Question.   
    Are you going for an English or French speaking residency? Either way, I would never count yourself out, as the GPA is only a fraction of the overall equation, and what matters is the program's perception of your future potential as a strong resident.
  6. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LittleDaisy in Using Reference Letters Form Same School + Same Discipline   
    I pay more attention to the quality/personalization of the letter than the school/hospital it came from.
  7. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from _ _ in Doing Ward Clerk Job While In Undergrad   
    count for what? I think it would provide a valuable perspective on how a hospital functions.
  8. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from radiologist1984 in Job Market And Starting Salary In Canada And Onatrio   
    It's hard to predict need for fellowships this far out. Sometimes it just comes down to the particular need of a group - i.e. someone just left or will retire, etc. As I said, doing a fellowship near where you would like to work will make it easier to conduct a job search. Evidently, Ontario will offer more choices than just looking in GTA.
     
    I do see positions posted online on a not infrequent basis. Wowjobs can trawl numerous sites for you at once. 
     
    Working under supervision without full Royal College certification might be possible in more underserved provinces.
    I'm not sure how it would work for someone who does not have even US certification though - check with CPSO:
    http://www.cpso.on.ca/Policies-Publications/Policy/Pathway-3-%E2%80%93-U-S-or-Canadian-Medical-Degree-or-Doct
  9. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from radiologist1984 in Job Market And Starting Salary In Canada And Onatrio   
    I don't know much about coming to Canada directly after an American residency, but you wouldn't be fully boarded under the new ABR exam at the end of your residency. I think anyone wanting to settle down in a country should really take a look at taking that country's exams (Royal College in this instance), as what is considered equivalent and acceptable from other countries could change at any time. 
     
    Doing a fellowship near where you want to settle will make it easier to leverage connections and travel to meet people and interview. The main ways to start looking for jobs are to 1) respond to ads or 2) talk to people, preferably both.
  10. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from doc123 in Cute Ways To Thank Referees?   
    Agree - it is about how the person feels when thanked. In the professional world, written cards / token gifts of appreciation for even one-time committee/event volunteers, as an example, are actually quite common and have no personal connotation.
     
    I guess the question is whether a reference is of special significance compared to the other ways the referee has helped one during the relationship, and for which one has undoubtedly already exchanged many verbal and email thank yous (as during the course of a project).. and if so, how to ensure that the appreciation is uniquely felt. Of course, everyone is individual, but if someone displays thank you cards in their office, that's probably a good sign that they would appreciate one.
  11. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from B3.572A in Radiology Shadowing   
    If you are strictly shadowing and not expecting any attention/explanations as people do their work, I don't think it would be too much of an imposition - not any more than sitting with someone during the day. Maybe as a medical student at the same institution, you could even be helpful (looking things up in EMR, etc.) But just ask and see what they say - every institution is different (size of call room, etc.)  
  12. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from mononoke in Anesthesia And Road   
    Haven't you heard the song from Amateur Transplants?
     

  13. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Arztin in Asked To Write My Own Reference   
    As has been said, you are supplying a *draft* of a letter to your referee for them to edit as they please and then finalize. You are not actually submitting the final version of the letter. Therefore, there is no fraud.
  14. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from B3.572A in Radiology Shadowing   
    I think that over the course of an afternoon/morning with someone, you'd be able to exhaust most people's perspectives about why they chose the field, what they like about it, etc. If you had a good rapport with someone, you could try to parlay that into a research project, rather than multiple shadowing sessions (unless it's an elective like IR where a student can advance in responsibility, versus shadowing in diagnostic radiology where a student is quite limited in what they can do). 
     
    To get a deeper understanding of the field, I'd suggest shadowing different areas in radiology, like mammo/IR/ultrasound, and perhaps different settings (though community/clinic settings may not be as accessible to a medical student). This would also allow you to be exposed to different radiologists at the same time.
     
    Residents can be a great source of info. I don't think it would hurt to contact the chiefs and get their advice on setting up shadowing at your school. Also don't discount the junior residents - they are closer to the whole career selection process, and often the more junior the person, the freer their schedule is to spend time chatting with you...
  15. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from B3.572A in Radiology Shadowing   
    You're welcome One other piece of advice I was given was to be flexible and open to spending time in a different area, if the area you were originally going to visit turns out to be especially busy that day.
  16. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Belle_MD in Where Are (And Aren't) The Jobs?   
    Given that it is 2015 and your expected graduation from a cardiology program would be 2025, with possibility of fellowship afterwards, I think the validity of any job market forecasts a decade plus into the future has its limits. Unless there are major changes in a field causing an overall decline, the job market usually moves in a cycle - as the market tightens up, fewer people go into a field, which eventually leads to a favourable market, which leads more people to enter again...
  17. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from ralk in Where Are (And Aren't) The Jobs?   
    Yes, ralk makes a good point that in medicine, the job market often depends more on factors on the demand side, rather than the supply side. 
    With regards to the concept of "making a job," first ask yourself how the position is created, if there are currently no jobs? Will it involve taking something away from someone? How feasible will this be?
  18. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from B3.572A in Radiology Elective Etiquette   
    In general, be the kind of person someone would enjoy working closely with day in and day out. Pleasant, socially aware, team player, interested yet not pushy, knowledgeable and helpful, appreciative of others' help.
     
    Point #1 simply relates to putting yourself in someone else's shoes, and being sensitive to others' feelings. Performance in rounds and readouts are often how residents are informally evaluated. In a supportive program, one might actually see residents whispering answers to others in the hot seat, so someone jumping in out of turn with an answer would be potentially perceived as trying to make themselves look good at the expense of others.
     
    That being said, I would not necessarily advise someone to pretend not to know something when asked directly - just be tactful, erring on the side of being a bit tentative rather than self-satisfied (e.g. could it be ----?), and mention that it was something that you had just been taught by so-and-so, if that is the case. I do feel this is where the culture of radiology differs a bit from other clerkship rotations. On IM and surgery, I felt that if one did not jump in to answer questions posed to the group, it would be taken as a sign of lack of interest or knowledge.
     
    With regards to #2, usually if you are offered to leave, it is because the educational portion of the day is over. However, in one instance, I have offered a student to leave early when they were clearly showing no signs of interest (nodding off unapologetically, staring off into space when being shown a case, zero questions). Make sure this isn't you. If you have made your interest in the elective clear, and you have been told there is nothing coming up that might be of value to see (e.g. on-call procedures), then go. Don't forget to thank the person you were sitting with for whatever effort they put into your day.
  19. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from katakari in 2Nd Year Pre-Clerkship- Research During School   
    It's not clear from your post what your aim is in doing research. Do you have fields of particular interest? If so, you should try to set up research/electives in those areas. Research in itself not a necessary tickbox in CaRMS, and at this point in medical school, unlikely to be of significant benefit if in an area completely unrelated to what you are interested in (which is a different scenario than if you were not sure about a field, and research was part of that exploration). Exception is if you are going to get rigorous training in research skills that would be transferable, but I'm not picking that up here.
  20. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from TheEmeraldTablet in Do You Feel It Was Worth It? Advice?   
    1) Yes.
     
    2) In Canada, all medical schools get you to the same point (entering residency), so probably not. However, I'm sure being in a suitable specialty would influence one's job satisfaction, since careers in different fields of medicine can be so, well, different.
     
    3) I never viewed it as a long path, i.e. something to be endured until one reaches a state where it was 'all worth it.' I found enjoyment and meaning in whatever I was doing at the time, whether it was studying or working. While one should choose a specialty that is suitable to them, it should also be kept in mind that one can be happy in more than one kind of career, and life is what you make of it.
  21. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LittleDaisy in Match Rate By Specialty And School?   
    It's probably less helpful than you think. The nationwide match rate gives you an idea of competitiveness. After that, success is much more dependent on the individual student than on the school they attended.
  22. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from Pokemon Trainer in Emergency Rads?   
    Trauma would be a subset of the indications for embolization, which is a skill that is part of the greater world of vascular IR.
    http://medical-imaging.utoronto.ca/fellowship/virfell.htm
  23. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from LittleDaisy in Im Resources   
    I used Approach to Internal Medicine and Case Files: Internal Medicine.
  24. Like
    Lactic Folly got a reaction from frozenarbitor in 1 Horrible Elective Evaluation   
    It would be better if this did not show up on your CaRMS application. Our school had a policy that they could omit isolated unrepresentative comments at their discretion.
     
    Is there an overall rotation supervisor who can synthesize all the evaluations into one paragraph?
     
    Any legitimate concerns should be documented while your memory of the details is still fresh. Be objective and calm as possible. If the evaluation is inaccurate, it should not be kept, but avoid any perception that it could have been justified or that you are acting defensively in response to the poor evaluation.
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